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I typed the following into ghci, thinking that one of two things would happen: 1) The interpreter would hang, searching every member of an infinite list for matches to a predicate; or 2) through behind-the-curtains Haskell jujitsu, the interpreter would somehow figure out that the sequence terminates at 4 and stop there.

[x | x <- [1..],5>x]

Outcome 1 was what happened. Now, outcome 2 was a lot to ask for. But since a human can prove that the sequence terminates at 4, might there be a way to get the interpreter to do it? Could this be rewritten in such a way that it does terminate? In fact, is there ever a predicate which makes a finite comprehension out of an infinite list?

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takeWhile (< 5) [1..] –  m09 Apr 26 '12 at 15:20
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@Mog: While I agree with you on your comment, isn't it cheating since you've somewhat changed the meaning of the comprehension? –  Ziyao Wei Apr 26 '12 at 15:25
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The capability of a human to prove something about a program is not always something an automatic program can mimic: you may be able to reason that some specific program can terminate, but in general this is not possible to compute (it's the halting problem, which is undecidable). And you can write any code you want in a list comprehension, so I believe in the general case the compiler will have very difficult time reasoning about your list comprehensions. –  gfour Apr 26 '12 at 15:28
    
I do agree that it's cheating, but whether this way or by using Data.List.Ordered, you have to help Haskell a tiny bit here, don't you? –  m09 Apr 26 '12 at 15:29
    
@mog But what about comprehensions having gaps yet still finite? Consider this contrived example: let f x = (2048 / ((-2) ^ x)) > 1. Then [x | x <- [1..], f x] gives [2,4,6,8,10 yet takeWhile f [1.. gives [] –  gcbenison Apr 26 '12 at 15:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

But since a human can prove that the sequence terminates at 4, might there be a way to get the interpreter to do it?

In this simple case, yes. But there cannot exist a general algorithm to determine if an expression is true or false for all natural numbers >n for some n, because Haskell is Turing-complete, so it's impossible to prove that an expression even represents a terminating program for all natural numbers.

Even if your expression were limited to basic integer arithmetic, its truth would still be undecidable in the general case.

Could this be rewritten in such a way that it does terminate?

As Mog wrote in the comment, it's takeWhile (< 5) [1..].

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So would you agree with @Kilian that "it would be possible to add symbolic reasoning to the interpreter so that it could prove that no further elements will be acceptable and then terminate"? –  gcbenison Apr 26 '12 at 15:42
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@gcbenison: yes and no. Yes, it might be possible. No, it would not work in the general case, so the interpreter could only guess the right answer in some cases. Either the language would have to be radically changed, or you're turning the interpreter into a theorem prover. –  larsmans Apr 26 '12 at 15:44
    
@larsmans "turning the interpreter into a theorem prover" as it ought to be anyways. ;) –  Will Ness Apr 26 '12 at 18:28
    
Wow, this is the first reference to the halting problem I've seen on Stack Overflow. –  senderle Apr 26 '12 at 20:51

takewhile is the correct solution for your specific problem, as mentioned above.

However, this is only because in your case, all acceptable arguments come before all unacceptable arguments, and the general list comprehension doesn't obey that constraint. It would certainly possible to add symbolic reasoning to the interpreter so that it could prove that no further elements will be acceptable and then terminate. (In fact, the sophisticated type system in Haskell would be quite useful in implementing such reasoning.) But it would not make sense to add this to the standard [|] operator, since the detector would have to run on all list comprehensions that are evaluated, and would very often fail to contribute anything except much more computing expense.

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This is an UI problem.

Prolog has cut operator; in Haskell we can specify in advance how many solutions do we expect. Like in your complex example (in the comments), take 5 $ map f [1..] would work, but take 6 ... would still go into a loop. To overcome that, we'd need a run-time system that is a theorem prover (as others have said), and/or a time-aware multithreading optimistic partial-evaluator that would open live "answer-boxes" for each user request. That would entail possibly tagging computations with a priority value (also at the language level).

I think this would be very practical in every sense. It'd let us get away with writing intuitive simple code which was the initial promise of equational reasoning approach anyway. Initially a code would get executed in regular Haskell mode, but then the analyzer would kick in, for lagging computations.

Interpreters are idle most of the time, anyway. Computers too, mostly.

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For "lagging computation" do you mean that the runtime would actually start an analyzer for code that was taking too long (as in wall clock time) to complete? –  gcbenison Apr 26 '12 at 19:10
    
@gcbenison something like that. A compiler too could do more work in the background even after giving an answer this time, to find more optimizations etc. That's all hypotheticals, of course. –  Will Ness Apr 27 '12 at 1:01
    
I think this is more of a discussion point than an answer to the question. SO isn't really the best place to have that sort of discussion. –  Ben Millwood Jan 4 '13 at 21:39

"But since a human can prove that the sequence terminates at 4, might there be a way to get the interpreter to do it?"

Good question. The difficult thing is not the proof that it terminates at 4, but the idea that it could possibly terminate at 4, followed by the insight that this is indeed so.

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