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I am not very good with regular expression.

I have a string like:

var bigString = 'abc,xyz,def';

I want to create a regular expression that it looks for either preceding commas or comma at the end.

e.g:

Valid expressions will be : abc, ,xyz, ,def

I will appreciate any kind of help.

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1  
Are those the only valid values? Is "abc" valid? – Ates Goral Apr 26 '12 at 15:36
    
Just alphabetical characters, or alpha-numerics? – David Thomas Apr 26 '12 at 15:37
    
Another question is, WHY? Maybe the problem you're trying to solve doesn't require a regular expression. Can you tell what you're exactly trying to do? – Ates Goral Apr 26 '12 at 15:41
    
"Valid expressions will be : abc, ,xyz, ,def" - /(abc,)|(,xyz,)|(,def)/ QED. – Neil Apr 26 '12 at 15:44
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well that regex would be:

/(?:,[A-Za-z]+)|(?:[A-Za-z],)/
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Shouldn't the last character, the regex delimiter, be /? – David Thomas Apr 26 '12 at 15:37
1  
This will match items with no commas at all, as they are both followed by ? – Ben Roux Apr 26 '12 at 15:38
    
Thanks @BenRoux: You're right, I just corrected it. – anubhava Apr 26 '12 at 15:42
/(,\w+)|(\w+,)/

This one will explicitly match where a comma is either at the beginning or the end of the string.

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This should work : (UPDATED)

/(,[\w]+)|([\w]+,)/
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If you are forcing a form, I would use this.
It validates strings 1,2 or 3 as one or more alpha chars with a comma before, after or both.

string1 = 'abc,'
string2 = ',xyz,'
string3 = ',def'



/^(?:[a-z]+,|,[a-z]+,?)$/i
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