Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm creating a login example to have a look at JSF with Faces, I have a PHP background so I'm with a lot of difficulties.

This is how I'm working, based on some google searches.

I have a folder with 3 controllers:

MainController; HomeController; LoginController;

I'll show each one bu without the get and set to make it easier to read.

MainController:

package com.erp3.gui.controllers;

import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;

public class MainController {

    public LoginController loginController;

    public MainController() {
        this.checkUserSession();
    }

    public String checkUserSession() {
        loginController = (LoginController) FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getSessionMap().get("loginController");
        if (!loginController.getIsLoggedIn()) {
            return "login.html";
        } else {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

HomeController:

package com.erp3.gui.controllers;

import javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean;
import javax.faces.bean.SessionScoped;

@ManagedBean
public class HomeController extends MainController {

    public String username;

    public HomeController() {
        super();
    }
}

LoginController:

package com.erp3.gui.controllers;

import javax.faces.application.FacesMessage;
import javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean;
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;

@ManagedBean
public class LoginController {

    public Boolean isLoggedIn = false;
    private String username;
    private String password;
    private FacesMessage msg;

    public String login() {

        if (this.getUsername().equals("daniel") && this.getPassword().equals("123")) {
            this.isLoggedIn = true;                 
            FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getSessionMap().put("loginController", this);
            return "home.html";
        } else {
            this.isLoggedIn = false;
            msg = new FacesMessage(FacesMessage.SEVERITY_ERROR, "Usuário ou senha inválida.", username);
            FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().addMessage(null, msg);
            return "login.html";
        }
    }

    public String logOut() {
        FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getSessionMap().remove("loginController");
        return "login.html";
    }
}

So, reading some pages I found this way of creating a session, don't no if it is correct:

FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getSessionMap().put("loginController", this);

What happens is that on HomeController I check for session status, if false redirect to login.xhtml

Another thing, when I log in, I'm redirected to the home.xhtml but the url is still on login.xhtml and when I change it to home.xhtml it returns me this beautiful error:

Cant instantiate class: com.erp3.gui.controllers.HomeController. 

I also would like to know that when I call my home.xhtml file, it loads the HomeController or Java simply loads the home.xhtml?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Navigation by returning string outcomes is only possible in real action methods which are invoked by UICommand components like <h:commandButton>, not in constructors.

That exception is a general exception which basically tells that new HomeController() failed. This should in turn have a root cause further down in the stacktrace. Perhaps a NullPointerException because loginController is null? In any way, the root cause which is the bottommost exception in the stacktrace is the most important exception to look for. Keep this in mind.

Both problems can be fixed the following way:

public class MainController {

    public MainController() throws IOException {
        this.checkUserSession();
    }

    public void checkUserSession() throws IOException {
        ExternalContext ec = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext();
        LoginController loginController = (LoginController) ec.getSessionMap().get("loginController");

        if (loginController == null || !loginController.getIsLoggedIn()) {
            ec.redirect(ec.getRequestContextPath() + "/login.html");
        }
    }

}

However, this approach has a technical problem. It is too late to send a redirect after the response is already committed. A bean can be constructed only at that moment when a part of the response has already been sent to the client. Rather look at container managed authentication or at least at servlet filters. But that's another story.

share|improve this answer
    
And can you explain me if when I call the home.html page the HomeController is called? –  Gerep Apr 26 '12 at 16:39
    
Depends on whether it's been referenced by #{homeController} in home.xhtml or not, or implicitly as managed property by another managed bean. I'd recommend to just go through a decent JSF book instead of cobbling some loose snippets together you found on the internet. –  BalusC Apr 26 '12 at 16:39
    
do you have a link where I can find some good content about how to correct my approach? –  Gerep Apr 26 '12 at 16:42
    
"Core JSF", or "JSF 2.0: The Complete Reference", or "Beginning Java EE 6: From Novice to Professional". Yes it are books. But you seem to be missing some very important fundamentals. Providing links with read-to-use code snippets would not teach you anything. –  BalusC Apr 26 '12 at 16:43
    
You are completely right, I have no idea of what I'm doing...my boos ordered me to do this java example and I'm find pieces on the web and trying to make them work together, anyway, thanks a lot for your references and time...the best –  Gerep Apr 26 '12 at 16:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.