Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following situation

file: ./include/functions/table-config.php containing:

.
.
$tablePages = 'orweb_pages';
.
.

file: ./include/classes/uri-resolve.php containing:

class URIResolve {
.
.
var $category;
.
.
function process_uri() {
...
    $this->category = $tablePages;
...
}
.
.
}

file: ./settings.php containing:

.
.
require_once(ABSPATH.INC.FUNC.'/table-config.php');
require_once(ABSPATH.INC.CLASS.'/uri-resolve.php');
.
.
Will this work. I mean will the access to $tablePages from process_uri() be acceptable or will it give erronous results.

Please suggest corrections or workarounds if error might occur.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use a global (not recommended), a constant or a singleton configuration class.

Simply including

$tablePages = 'orweb_pages';

will give your variable local scope so it won't be visible inside other classes. If you use a constant:

define('TABLE_PAGES', 'orweb_pages');

TABLE_PAGES will be available for read access throughout the application regardless of scope.

The advantage of a constant over a global variable is that you dont have to worry about it being overridden in other areas of the application.

share|improve this answer
    
do constants necessarily have to be full Caps or is it just a programming practice to avoid any commonplace identifier clashes? –  OrangeRind Jun 23 '09 at 17:08
    
Just common practice –  jcoffey Jun 23 '09 at 17:09
    
is the scope problem true for functions defined outside the class also? –  OrangeRind Jun 23 '09 at 17:12
    
no, functions declared outside a class are in the global namespace –  jcoffey Jun 23 '09 at 17:15

Use the global keyword:

In the file where you're assigning the value.

global $tablePages;
$tablePages = 'orweb_pages';

And in the other file:

class URIResolve {
  var $category;
  function process_uri() {
    global $tablePages;
    $this->category = $tablePages;
  }
}

Also, all global variables are available in the $GLOBALS array (which itself is a superglobal), so you can access the global variable anywhere without using the global keyword by doing something like this:

$my_value = $GLOBALS['tablePages'];

This also serves to make it harder to accidentally overwrite the value of the global. In the former example, any changes you made to $tablePages would change the global variable. Many a security bug has been created by having a global $user and overwriting it with a more powerful user's information.

Another, even safer approach is to provide the variable in the constructor to URIResolve:

class URIResolve {
  var $category;

  function __construct ($tablePages) {
    $this->category= $tablePages;
  }

  function process_uri() {
    // Now you can access table pages here as an variable instance
  }
}

// This would then be used as:
new URIResolve($tablePages);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! Doubts: I will have to manually declare $GLOBALS['tablePages'] = 'tablePages'; right? –  OrangeRind Jun 23 '09 at 17:10
    
I like the last tip to pass to the constructor. Important. Thumbs up. –  andho Feb 29 '12 at 5:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.