Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My database has implicit cast from integer to text, so I'm getting some 'operator is not unique' issues. I'm trying to delete the operator || (text, anynonarray) with no success, the error message is

ERROR: cannot drop operator ||(text,anynonarray) because it is required by the database system SQL state: 2BP01

I have another database that doesn't have this operator, so I think is possible somehow. I cannot add explicit casts in hundreds of queries, neither remove the implicit casts. There's a way to force the remotion of this operator?

share|improve this question
    
2BP01 means it has dependent objects, Did you try it with cascade in your drop command? postgresql.org/docs/9.1/interactive/sql-dropoperator.html Be careful with cascades it might drop more then you want so make a backup first. –  Eelke Apr 26 '12 at 16:43
    
DROP OPERATOR ||(anynonarray, text) CASCADE; the error continues. –  Humberto Pinheiro Apr 26 '12 at 16:51
1  
It's a system operator i.e. you can't drop it. –  Milen A. Radev Apr 26 '12 at 17:11
    
But there's another database here and it doesn't have these operators! –  Humberto Pinheiro Apr 26 '12 at 17:15
    
What are the PostgreSQL versions involved? –  kgrittn Apr 26 '12 at 18:02

1 Answer 1

up vote -2 down vote accepted

Seems I got it. The trick is to delete right from the pg_operator table.

delete from pg_operator where oprname = '||' and (oprleft = 25 or oprleft = 2776 ) and oprleft != oprright

Because I wanted to delete these operators:

OPERATOR ||("text", anynonarray);

OPERATOR ||(anynonarray, "text");

I don't know if there are any implications though, seems ok till now.

share|improve this answer
3  
A bit scary solution... –  vyegorov Apr 26 '12 at 20:52
    
You are deleting operators from the basic Postgres system: textanycat and anytextcat. Expressions of the form 'a'::text || '1'::int or '1'::int || 'a'::text that would normally evaluate to the text a1 / 1a will produce an error. An extension or client or any SQL code may be assuming these operators and fail unexpectedly. In short: Don't try this at home! –  Erwin Brandstetter Jun 27 '12 at 23:26
    
select 'a'::text || '1'::int and the other didn't produce error though –  Humberto Pinheiro Jun 28 '12 at 13:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.