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I'm having trouble stopping a while-loop in the KeyListener function. Every 10 seconds the Timer function declares Active to be false. But still the while loop in the KeyListener function keeps running. I can't figure out why the loop keeps running; every cycle it should test whether Active is true, if it's not (because after 10 seconds it should be switched off) the loop shouldn't be running. But it does.

void KeyListener(bool Active)
{
    cout << Active << endl; //debug
    while (Active==true){ 
        cout << "loop still running." << endl; //debug
        Sleep(100);
        for (int i=8;i<=190;i++){ 
            if (GetAsyncKeyState(i) == -32767){
                KeyWrite(i); // (turns the numbers into characters)
            }       
        }
    }
}

void Timer(void* pParams){
    while (true){
        Sleep(10000); 
        KeyListener(false); // Active = false
        cout << "KeyListener(false)" << endl; // debug
    }
}

int main()
{
    _beginthread( Timer, 0, NULL ); 
    KeyListener(true);

    return 0;
}

http://codeviewer.org/view/code:2571

Any help or suggestions are greatly appreciated!

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I linked the code, since I don't know how / don't have the privilege to embed it.. –  Rob Apr 26 '12 at 16:36
1  
Before running into threads, get a basic understanding of how functions in c++ work. –  Dani Apr 26 '12 at 16:39
1  
you're calling the function twice. You aren't stopping the first one you're creating another one that stops immediately. –  twain249 Apr 26 '12 at 16:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

After 10 seconds, the separate thread calls KeyListener(false). This sets Active false for that function call. However, the original KeyListener(true) function call is not affected. There is no way for a new call to affect a non-static local variable of the old call.


volatile bool Active;

void KeyListener()
{
    cout << Active << endl; //debug
    while (Active==true){ 
        cout << "loop still running." << endl; //debug
        Sleep(100);
        for (int i=8;i<=190;i++){ 
            if (GetAsyncKeyState(i) == -32767){
                KeyWrite(i); // (turns the numbers into characters)
            }       
        }
    }
}

void Timer(void* pParams){
    while (true){
        Sleep(10000); 
        Active = false
        cout << "Active = false" << endl; // debug
    }
}

int main()
{
    Active = true;
    _beginthread( Timer, 0, NULL ); 
    KeyListener();

    return 0;
}
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Thanks for your help Sam. Can you tell me whether is it all possible to interrupt a loop from another thread? Thanks again! –  Rob Apr 26 '12 at 16:43
    
Rob, @ZanLynx answer looks like it points you in the right direction. If you need more help beyond that, comment on his answer, will be watching. –  Sam DeHaan Apr 26 '12 at 16:46
    
Well, I turned Active into a volatile boolean, (which should make it a global one?) but still there's no effect. –  Rob Apr 26 '12 at 16:59
    
@Rob, you need to turn Active into a global, and also make it volatile. Look at my edit. –  Sam DeHaan Apr 26 '12 at 17:06
    
Oh yeah, I've never dealt with global variables. Didn't even know it was possible to have declarations outside void / functions. Also, you might want to edit KeyListener(true); in the main function since KeyListener doesn't take values. (Should just be KeyListener()). Thanks a ton for your help and efforts (it now works!). Cheers –  Rob Apr 26 '12 at 17:12

Each of your calls to KeyListener has its own copy of Active because it is a function argument.

You need to make this value available to both threads. It should probably be a global. It will need to be marked volatile or the compiler will store the value into a register and never read it from main memory, or it may even turn it into an infinite loop.

A better way would be to use some kind of event or condition variable which will be properly thread synchronized.

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Thanks a lot, I will definitely see into that –  Rob Apr 26 '12 at 16:45

You have two different threads calling the same function. That creates two different Active values.

Calling a function again doesn't affect the value of parameters to the previous call.

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Same question to you, is it at all possible to interrupt a loop from another thread? Thanks for your help! –  Rob Apr 26 '12 at 16:44

You said

every cycle it should test wether Active is true This may not be the case. The compiler could be optimizing out that comparison since it doesn't see anything being done to Active in that block. I suggest that you use the volatile specifier for Active to ensure that the code does check the in memory value of Active each time.

volatile bool Active;

Edit: Also, as someone pointer out, in your Timer function you call KeyListener(false) for some reason. You should be setting Active to false (which was commented out).

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I'm pretty sure your KeyListener function that Timer is calling is not the same one main function calls. Only call KeyListener in the main thread, then in your other thread, have it access a shared variable and set it to false.

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