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I have inherited a server that has mysql installed on it. I don't have the mysql password for any user, not even root (although I have the linux root password). Plus, I am only aware of one other user account besdies root, and that one does not have privileges to perform any action, not even SELECT.

I tried stopping the mysql servicw, restarting with the skip grant tables option, and just logging in without password:

service mysqld stop
service mysqld start --skip-grant-tables &
mysql -u root

But get the following error:

Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: NO)

I then tried resetting the password:

mysqladmin -u root password 'newpw'

But that also gives an access denied error.

I also tried logging in as the other user (without pw) and executing the following command:

UPDATE mysql.user SET Password=PASSWORD('MyNewPass') WHERE User='root';

and got this error:

ERROR 1142 (42000): UPDATE command denied to user ''@'localhost' for table 'user'

I have also tried removing mysql and reinstalling, but I get the same errors.

Any suggestions?

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Try these instructions from the manual. –  Michael Mior Apr 26 '12 at 17:03
1  
Note that if you want to use --skip-grant-tables you may need to start mysqld directly as the options aren't necessarily passed along through the init script. –  Michael Mior Apr 26 '12 at 17:04
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This question really belongs on Database Administrators or Super User, not SO. –  eggyal Apr 26 '12 at 17:06
    
@Michael Mior: Thanks, got it working again! –  Bad Programmer Apr 26 '12 at 20:02
    
@Michael Mior: Do you want to post an answer, so that I can select it as the correct one and give you rep? –  Bad Programmer Apr 26 '12 at 20:02
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Two options:

If you want to use --skip-grant-tables you may need to start mysqld directly as the options aren't necessarily passed along through the init script.

Otherwise, try these instructions from the manual.

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try sudo dpkg-reconfigure mysql-server-5.5 and you will be asked for the new root password.

Replace 5.5 with your current mysql-server version

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The most convenient, quick, elegant Debian-like way. Works like a charm –  Michael Franzl Mar 23 at 19:03
    
Will not work for setting password to no password. In such case, set any password, log into mysql and SET PASSWORD FOR root@localhost=PASSWORD(''); –  user35186 Mar 24 at 12:07
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to recover your MySQL root password you can try this option

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`UPDATE mysql.user SET Password=PASSWORD('MyNewPass') WHERE User='root'; FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Write the UPDATE and FLUSH statements each on a single line. The UPDATE statement resets the password for all root accounts, and the FLUSH statement tells the server to reload the grant tables into memory so that it notices the password change.`

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In my case was happening same but I was making mistake in logging into mysql prompt. I was doing by mysql instead of mysql -u root -p

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