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In my original code, I'm adding nodes to a tree. My goal is to somehow get access to the last node that I added in the tree (my idea was to create another object that will point to the last object (node in my original example)).

public class RandomSubClass 
{
    int firstNum;
}    

import java.util.LinkedList;

public class RandomClass 
{
    LinkedList<RandomSubClass> myListOfObjects = new LinkedList<RandomSubClass>();

    void addItem(int firstNum, RandomSubClass toBeReturned)
    {       
        RandomSubClass o1 = new RandomSubClass();
        o1.firstNum = firstNum;
        myListOfObjects.add(o1);

        // Here I was thinking that 'toBeReturned' will get same address as
        // 'o1', and by changing 'toBeReturned' (in main), values in 'o1' change
        //
        toBeReturned = o1;

        // This following commented code worked, 
        // but I can't use it in my original code.
        //
        // The reason I can't use it is because when I add a node to a tree, 
        // I start at the root and trace the new node's way to a new leaf, 
        // which makes it hard to do (simply) that.
        //
        //toBeReturned.firstNum = firstNum;
        //myListOfObjects.add(toBeReturned);
    }   
}

public class Main 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        RandomClass myList = new RandomClass();

        RandomSubClass r1 = new RandomSubClass();
        RandomSubClass r2 = new RandomSubClass();

        myList.addItem(1, r1);
        myList.addItem(2, r2);

        // I would like to do that, and see changes in the node in 'myList'
        //  
        r1.firstNum = 10;
        r2.firstNum = 20;
    }
}

I want to check something about the node after I add it to the tree, and if it satisfies some condition, I want to change a flag for that node.

I can re-trace the node again (starting at root), but my tree might get huge at some point and it will take time. So if I get the address of that node when I add it, and after I check my condition, I can modify the flag at that address, knowing that it will change the flag at that node (last added).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do this. I give you permission. :-) But your example code won't work because Java objects are passed by value, not by reference. That is, when you pass an object to a function, if you reassign that object, it has no effect on the caller. For example:

void caller()
{
  String s1="Hello";
  updateString(s1);
  System.out.println(s1);
}
void updateString(String s1)
{
  s1="Goodbye";
}

The output of this function is "Hello", NOT "Goodbye". The assignment within the updateString function does not change the value passed in by the caller.

There are (at least) three ways to do what you want.

Method 1: The simplest is to return the new object, rather than updating a parameter:

SomeObject addItem(int firstnum)
{
  SomeObject o1=new SomeObject();
  o1.firstnum=firstnum;
  objectList.add(o1);
  return o1;
}
...
void callingFunction()
{
  SomeObject newObject=addItem(1);
  newObject.secondnum=2;
  ... etc ...
}

I prefer this method what I don't need to have some other return value: it's clean and simple.

Method 2: Create a global variable and store a handle of the object there. But this method sucks, because globals suck in general. I only mention it to tell you not to do it.

Method 3: Create a wrapper to hold a reference to the object. Then pass the wrapper to the "add" function, which can update the value within the class.

class SomeObjectWrapper
{
  public SomeObject someObject;
}
...
void addItem(int firstnum, SomeObjectWrapper sow)
{
  SomeObject o1=new SomeObject();
  o1.firstnum=firstnum;
  objectList.add(o1);
  sow.someobject=o1;
}
...
void callingFunction()
{
  SomeObjectWrapper sow=new SomeObjectWrapper();
  SomeObject newObject=addItem(1, sow);
  sow.someObject.secondnum=2;
  ... whatever ...
}
share|improve this answer

How about doing it with a return value:

RandomSubClass addItem(int firstNum)
{       
    RandomSubClass o1 = new RandomSubClass();
    o1.firstNum = firstNum;
    myListOfObjects.add(o1);

    // Here I was thinking that 'toBeReturned' will get same address as
    // 'o1', and by changing 'toBeReturned' (in main), values in 'o1' change
    //
    ....
    return o1
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I tried this approach and it worked, but I'm already returning a boolean flag that will indicate whether the node was successfully inserted or not. If this is a good approach, I can return the RandomSubClass, and pass boolean flag by reference to indicate whether the node was successfully added or not! –  Roronoa Zoro Apr 26 '12 at 17:52
    
@RoronoaZoro I'd say that returning false in methods just to indicate failure is not a very good approach. I know that the Java libraries have some of these methods, but if you do so you lose the option to return anything else. The best solution would be to use exceptions to indicate failure. Write a class that extends Exception and then make RandomSubClass addItem(int firstNum) throws ItemAdditionFailedException or something like that. –  MDeSchaepmeester Apr 26 '12 at 17:55
    
I'm adding unique nodes to the tree, by 'successfully added', I meant that there was no node that had the same value, so the tree changed. I will use this value later to do more stuff. I don't think I can use Exception in this case, correct if I'm wrong or if there's another good way to go about my situation. –  Roronoa Zoro Apr 26 '12 at 17:59
    
You can't just "pass a boolean flag by reference". bool's are primitives so are passed by value, and Boolean's are immutable. You'd have to create your own wrapper object to hold the flag. Which gets you back where you started from -- see my answer above. Something has to be in a wrapper, either the flag or the node. –  Jay Apr 26 '12 at 18:02
    
Well, I'm sure you COULD you an exception, the question is whether that's the best way to do it. If you find yourself writing a TRY block around a single statement and catching the exception immediately after, then it's probably easier and cleaner to just make it a return value. If you have a return value and after calling the function you say "if (success)" followed by a big block of code and then "else" followed by error handling, it would be cleaner as an exception. (continued ...) –  Jay Apr 26 '12 at 18:06

In Java all object are returned/passed via parameters by address. Only the primitives types (int, float, double...) are passed by value, if you want the primitive types to be passed by address use: -Integer instead of int -Double instead of double -Float instead of Float -ect...

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