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I'm pretty sure my problem is existent in my try block somewhere, but I can't seem to pinpoint it. What I'm doing is reading from a file, and checking the input. If the input is >0, I'd like to increment goodData, and if not, it should either throw BPIllegalValueException for values <0, or InputMismatchException for things that aren't integers. I was hoping you guys could help out.

EDIT: Professors Instructions:

In your program, you need two exceptions to handle two kinds of bad data. For the non-integer reading, you can use nextInt() method to read an integer from the file, if the data is not an integer, InputMismatchException will be thrown. Your program must catch this exception. To handle the negative reading, you may want to declare your own Exception class: BPIllegalValueException (you are expected to write BPIllegalValueException.java that contains the class), and threw this exception when a negative value is read. Note: your program should not terminate when a bad data is read. Therefore, you must use try/catch block to handle the bad data. Your program is expected to print out (on the screen) the number of good BP readings and the number of bad data.

My code is as follows:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class DemoEx {

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
    FileReader fr = new FileReader("BP.txt");
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
    Scanner in = new Scanner(new FileReader("BP.txt"));
    int badData = 0;
    int goodData = 0;
    int data;
    String str = "";

    while((str = br.readLine()) != null)
    {   
        try
        {
            data = in.nextInt();
            if(data>0)
                goodData++;
            else if(data<0)
                throw new BPIllegalValueException(data);
            else
                throw new InputMismatchException();
        }

        catch(InputMismatchException ex)
        {
            badData++;
        }

        catch(BPIllegalValueException ex)
        {
            badData++;
        }
    }

    System.out.println("The number of good data: " + goodData);
    System.out.println("The number of bad data: " + badData);

}

}
share|improve this question
5  
You shouldn't really use exceptions for control flow. –  Edwin Dalorzo Apr 26 '12 at 17:56
3  
What is the error you're getting? Can you post some sample input/output? –  Chetter Hummin Apr 26 '12 at 17:56
    
What is your actual question/problem? –  evanwong Apr 26 '12 at 17:56
    
@edalorzo, that's good advice, but why not help him out by giving a concrete example of what he should do instead in this case? –  sblom Apr 26 '12 at 17:57
    
@Nate Is there a particular reason because of which you need to iterate over the files using both a Scanner and BufferReader simultaneously? –  Edwin Dalorzo Apr 26 '12 at 18:00

3 Answers 3

Why do you throw exceptions when you just want to increase a counter?

It looks like you want,

if (data > 0) 
    goodData++ 
 else 
     badData++;

Now, before you do this make sure data is an integer, which you will get if you do .nextInt if there are any, and all other non-int values will be skipped. So it depends which way you read the data, why a scanner? Why not a buffered reader and readLine then split it do whatever you like?

share|improve this answer
    
I wish I could do it that simply, as thats what I had done, and had working initially. The problem is this is how the assignment needs to be done. I did not know that until speaking with my professor about it today. I'm just not sure how to handle it this way. –  Nate Apr 26 '12 at 18:00
    
@Nate so what is your actual problem? –  MDeSchaepmeester Apr 26 '12 at 18:01
    
@Nate, I see, so if he wants you to throw and catch some exceptions, then make methods and throw the exceptions from there, then catch the exceptions in the code you call. Thats all really bad style, your professor probably sucks. –  rapadura Apr 26 '12 at 18:03
    
@Antonioo, I agree, hes not the greatest. Frankly the only reason I'm able to understand things so well with him is because of my background in C/C++. I've edited the main post to include his instructions, word for word. –  Nate Apr 26 '12 at 18:07

Based on your example, why are you even using Exceptions? What you are doing is not handling an error, it looks like you are performing logic. Errors should be show stoppers, not being used to perform logic in your code. Just increment bad data instead of using exceptions. Exceptions can also slow down your code.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with you completely, its just how he wants it done. I've included his instructions in my main post. –  Nate Apr 26 '12 at 18:13

You do not need to iterate over two different streams. The scanner should suffice.

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("BP.txt"));
    Scanner in = new Scanner(br);

Also, you should not use exceptions for control flow, use if/else statements instead.

        if(data > 0){
            goodData++;
        }else { //if (data <= 0)
            badData++;
        }

The loop should be controlled by the scanner, which is the one looking for the numbers:

    while(in.hasNext()){ ... }

Finally, if your file contains other tokens different than numbers, make sure you iterate over them, or you will program an endless loop:

        if(in.hasNextInt()){
            data = in.nextInt();
        }else{
            in.next(); //makes sure you move to the next token if it is not an int.
        }

In the overall, something like this:

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("BP.txt"));
    Scanner in = new Scanner(br);
    int badData = 0;
    int goodData = 0;
    int data = 0; //this must be initialized

    while(in.hasNext()){
        if(in.hasNextInt()){
            data = in.nextInt();
            if(data > 0){
                goodData++;
            }else if (data <= 0){
                badData++;
            }
        }else{
            in.next(); //move to the next token when it-s not an int.
        }

    }

System.out.println("The number of good data: " + goodData);
System.out.println("The number of bad data: " + badData);

If you file BP.txt contained something like: 1 2 A B C 4 5 6 -1 -2 C B

It would output:

The number of good data: 8
The number of bad data: 4

Which assume corresponds to the output your are expecting.

share|improve this answer
    
This is basically what I had done from the start, but he wants it done with exceptions for some reason. I have included his instructions as an edit to the main post. –  Nate Apr 26 '12 at 18:12
    
@Nate Well, your professor is just teaching you a bad practice with the intention of teaching you how to use exceptions. Anyways, overlook my control flow comment, the rest should be the same. –  Edwin Dalorzo Apr 26 '12 at 18:20
    
@Nate, use this solution, but put the data = in.nextInt(); line in a method like (sign of it) private void ouch() throws BadExceptions; then call it, and inside it instead of goodData++, throw BadException1, and instead of badData++, throw BadException2. then do, try { ouch(); catch be1 goodData++, catch be2 badData++. –  rapadura Apr 26 '12 at 18:32
1  
@Nate then, in the else { in.next(); } block, to count the non-integers (not only integers <= 0), add a badData++ as well. Your professor sucks really much, you should have badIntegers (which are <= 0) and badData which is nonIntegers. –  rapadura Apr 26 '12 at 18:34

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