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I have a class for loading and render objects in OpenGL. For loading objects I have a function called LoadFile(std::string FilePath) which work just fine but now I also want to load a file from the constructor so I tried doing this:

CObject(std::string FilePath)
{
    CObject(); // set all values to 0
    LoadFile(FilePath);
}

But doing this crashes my app whenever I try to render and I really have no idea why :s.

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Error message? Did you try a debugger? What's in CObject()? And please work on your acception rate. –  Sebastian Dressler Apr 26 '12 at 18:10
    
Better create another member function which does those assignments and call it in constructor. –  M3taSpl0it Apr 26 '12 at 18:11
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3 Answers 3

Well, CObject(); doesn't set all values to 0, but creates a temporary object. It should be:

CObject(std::string FilePath)
{
    //manually set fields to 0
    LoadFile(FilePath);
}

If your default constructor also calls itself again, it's most probably a stack overflow error.

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1  
I don't see any aspect of this worth downvoting... –  ildjarn Apr 26 '12 at 18:19
    
@ildjarn does pointing out something wrong in a different answer not count? –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 18:20
    
Apparently to some people... ;-/ –  ildjarn Apr 26 '12 at 18:21
    
I did that but the I get the same problem. –  Traxmate Apr 26 '12 at 18:42
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Calling a constructor of the same class from within a constructor won't work as Java (that is delegate some of the job to a more generic constructor). That syntax there just means that you're creating a new temporary object with the default constructor.

The only close thing is C++11's delegated constructor:

CObject(std::string FilePath): CObject()
{
    LoadFile(FilePath);
}
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1  
Sure you CAN call a constructor from within a constructor. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 18:11
1  
@Luchian Grigore In C++03 you cannot call a constructor from another constructor of the same class for the same object. Also you don't have to explicitly specify every single detail that can be understood from context. –  n.m. Apr 26 '12 at 18:20
2  
@n.m. What if the op is a beginner? He sees someone with 700+ rep on SO that says "You cannot call a constructor from within a constructor" and takes this as a rule, because someone inexperienced can't see the context you see. You have to specify the details, and this isn't just a detail. It's wrong!. I can't believe I'm arguing about this. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 18:24
1  
@Traxmate: A few hundred lines long uncompilable fragment of code is not anyone's idea to spend an hour. If you can't narrow the problem to a small compilable self-contained example, then the question is not for this site. –  n.m. Apr 26 '12 at 19:02
1  
@n.m. Ok I see. Lorenzo edited the question and, IMO, that's enough. And I really hope it's just stubbornness on your behalf that makes you go on with this. You do realize that you're saying "It's ok to give out false information, people can read between the lines"? I'm not going to waste any more time with your nonsense. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 20:49
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When you call the CObject() constructor to set all values to 0. You are actually creating a temporary CObject instead of setting all of the current objects values to 0.

What you need to do is either create a private initialization method that both the default and other constructors can call before loading a file or initialize the objects members in the CObject(std::string FilePath) constructor.

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