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I have an example code like this:

int var;
var = MACRO_A;

I expect the MACRO_A has been defined like this:

#define MACRO_A    1234

However, I can not find the MACRO_A defined anywhere in the source code, but I can build the code successfully, so what is the value of var at the end ?

The compiler is gcc.

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2  
Use gcc -C -E source.c > source.i to get the preprocessed form, and look inside... –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 26 '12 at 18:22
    
@eepty if you find my answer useful, please feel free to upvote and choose my post as the answer. –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Apr 26 '12 at 18:48
    
@cnicutar , @Sangeeth Saravanaraj , @Basile Starynkevitch I am writing a software for an embedded device, and I am using the Atmel Studio5 IDE in Windows, sorry all but I am not sure how to check the -D option and the gcc -C -E source.c > source.i. I have tried to read the build option in the IDE but I can not find these options... –  eepty May 1 '12 at 9:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That macro could have been passed during compilation with -D option.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i = MACRO_A;
    printf("MACRO_A : %d \n", i);
    return 0;
}

Output:

$ gcc macro.c -D MACRO_A=10
$ ./a.out 
MACRO_A : 10 
$ 
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Often, the -DMACRO_A=10 argument to the compiler is buried in the build process, e.g. Makefile-s, autoconf, etc etc. I recommend checking it with #ifdef and issue a meaningful #error otherwise... –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 26 '12 at 19:39

However, I can not find the MACRO_A defined anywhere in the source code, but I can build the code successfully, so what is the value of var at the end

It's there somewhere or it wouldn't compile. Perhaps it's defined directly on the command line ? (-DMACRO_A)

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