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I have something like the attached. I basically have a Doer class in which I want to call Func() from it's member without using virtual or with the least code duplication possible. Also, boost is not an option either. I know the example may not be so clear but I hope you get the idea. B

class Base { // a bunch of shared base functionality. Cannot be instantiated by itself  }

class D1 : public Base
{
   void Func();
}

class D2 : public Base
{
   void Func();
}

//----

class Doer
{
   Doer(Base* b) : base(b) { } 

   void DoIt()
   {
      base->Func();
   }

   Base* base;
}
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1  
Are you asking about CRTP? – ildjarn Apr 26 '12 at 18:29
    
Without virtual calls there are a couple of methods to do this, but they are all ugly and should be avoided. You could use templates as shown below. Dynamic casts also work, but are horribly slow and ugly. There may be more ways even, but nothing worth the effort. What is the reason for you to try to avoid virtuals here? Maybe if you give the actual reason, somebody can try to help you find a design that actually makes sense. – LiKao Apr 26 '12 at 18:31
    
It's used in a very tight loop and needs to be efficient, that's why I tagged it as Performance. Not looking for anything elegant, I don't mind hacky code for this as it is highly specialized! – chriskirk Apr 26 '12 at 18:34
    
"It's used in a very tight loop" -- What are you doing in the loop? – Cameron Apr 26 '12 at 18:37
    
@Cameron There is one Doer per Base(D1,D2) and whose DoIt() is called which needs to call base->Func(). The DoIt()s are part of the main program loop which is extremely tight. – chriskirk Apr 26 '12 at 18:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, you can make Doer templated:

template<class T>
class Doer
{
public:
   Doer(T* b) : base(b) { } 

   void DoIt()
   {
      base->Func();
   }

private:
   T* base;
};

But for this I would just add a virtual void Func() to Base instead.

Note that you'll probably want to make Func public in either case :-)

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For efficiency, I need to make sure there is no vtable at all. Doer is actually relatively big class, is there any way to not templatize the whole class to save on code-duplication and size? – chriskirk Apr 26 '12 at 18:30
    
@chriskirk: Well, you could move all the non-templated code to a non-templated friend class with all static methods that you pass your instance and (Base*)base to... but that's really ugly. (There's cleaner ways with, e.g. the pimpl idiom, but I doubt you'd want an extra pointer since you're against the vtable). That technique would still add an extra function call of redirection, though. – Cameron Apr 26 '12 at 18:35
2  
@chriskirk, you could make a parent class for Doer that contains everything that doesn't depend on the template type. But there's no way to avoid using a template if you don't want virtual methods. – Mark Ransom Apr 26 '12 at 18:49
    
@MarkRansom sorry, I just posted a new approach below. I suppose that won't work? I will try the template approach, I guess it's probably the best way given the context. – chriskirk Apr 26 '12 at 18:53
    
@MarkRansom I used your technique and subclassed w/ templates and I like it. Thanks. – chriskirk Apr 26 '12 at 19:05

What about this approach:

class Base { // a bunch of shared base functionality. Cannot be instantiated by itself  
   ~Base() { //stuff }
   void Func();
}

class D1 : public Base
{
   void Func();
}

class D2 : public Base
{
   void Func();
}

//----

class Doer
{
   Doer(Base* b) : base(b) { } 

   void DoIt()
   {
      base->Func();
   }

   Base* base;
}

Since Func() isn't virtual and is being overloaded by the children, there shouldn't be a vtable or any incurred performance penalty right?

Also, the destructor needs to be called on the base class, but declaring it virtual will impose a vtable?

Can anyone clarify?

Thanks

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2  
This won't work. The compiler will look at base->Func, discover that base is a Base*, and resolve the call to the Func in Base at compile time. This is why virtual exists in the first place -- so that an overridden method can be called depending on the runtime type of the actual object being pointed to, instead of the type of the pointer. – Cameron Apr 26 '12 at 18:58
1  
@Cameron, exactly correct. You get around it with a template class because the pointer is templated to the exact derived class type. – Mark Ransom Apr 26 '12 at 19:01

You can use mixins! They're good for optimization (lots of inlining opportunities and no virtual method calls), but sometimes a little hard to reason about. Here's your example implemented with mixins:

template<class Base> class Doer : Base {
public:
    Doer() {}
    void DoIt() {
        this->Func();
    }
};

class D1 {
public:
    void Func() {
        cout<<"Hello from D1"<<endl;
    }
};

class D2 {
public:
    void Func() {
        cout<<"Hello from D2"<<endl;
    }
};

Using this is a little different, since the Doer is same as your Base class instance. The following program:

Doer<D1> *d1 = new Doer<D1>();
Doer<D2> *d2 = new Doer<D2>();
d1->DoIt();
d2->DoIt();

Produces the output:

Hello from D1

Hello from D2

This has the obvious drawback that D1 and D2 aren't forced to implement the "Func" method. If you forget it, you'll get an oh-so-handy C++ template instantiation error instead of "method not found." Clang is a great choice if you're going to be using templates frequently, since you get much more helpful compiler errors than with g++. Another drawback is with constructors: Doer defines the default constructor, but doesn't expose D1's constructor. C++11 allows for constructor inheritance, so this issue can be avoided with a compiler flag.

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Thank you, that's exactly how I did it in the end! – chriskirk Apr 26 '12 at 20:03
    
I haven't tried using clang++ to compile yet, do you use it just to make sure everything compiles? I'd be interested in using it. – chriskirk Apr 26 '12 at 20:04
    
Clang++ is a front-end for the LLVM compiler, and it's mostly-compatible with GCC's flags. It can also be used as a static analysis tool, but I haven't used it this way. – ccurtsinger Apr 26 '12 at 20:06
    
FYI, if you use the approach @Cameron gave, you can't add "virtual void Func()" to the Base class. You'll either call Base::Func (if you don't mark D1::Base as virtual) or you'll end up with a vtbl. – ccurtsinger Apr 26 '12 at 20:08

in fact you don't need to parameterize the whole Doer class. This will work just fine (close to what ccurtsinger was suggesting):

class Base {
public:
    void Func() {};
};

class B1 {
public:
    void Func() { cout << "in B1::Func" << endl;}
};

class B2 {
public:
    void Func() { cout << "in B2::Func" << endl;}
};

class Doer {
public:
    template <class B> void Do(B *pb) {pb->Func();}
};

int main() {
    B1 b1;
    B2 b2;
    Doer d;
    d.Do<B1>(&b1);
    d.Do<B2>(&b2);

    return 0;
}

But really there's a bigger question: from the code you said you finally used it seems like at compile time you know exactly which derived classes objects you're dealing with, so code like:

for(auto i = begin(B1_container); i != end(B1_container); ++i) {
    i->Func();
}
for(auto j = begin(B2_container); j != end(B2_container); ++j) {
    j->Func();
}

should do the trick.

What I'm saying is - you either know in advance that you're working with B1-s here and B2-s there and there's no additional cost for Func() invocation, OR you don't know which one you are to deal with next and then you need to check it's dynamic type of some type of trait or whatever and that's an 'if' and thus branching and thus mispredictions and overhead. Notice, I'm not adding the cost of a function call, which is there in both cases regardless.

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