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I have a [seemingly] trivial dust.js template. The context object I am using to render the template contains a handler which references another item in the context object. I also include a toString handler, which also references another item in the context object.

Template:

{error}
<pre>
{#error.getStackTrace}
{.}{~n}
{/error.getStackTrace}
</pre>

Context:

{
  error: {
    st: ['a','b','c'],
    msg: 'This is an error message',
    getStackTrace: function () {
      return this.st;
    },
    toString: function () {
      return this.msg;
    }
  }
}

Rendered:

This is an error message<pre></pre>

If I reference {#error.st} directly, it renders correctly:

This is an error message<pre>a
b
c
</pre>

If I inspect 'this' inside of the getStackTrace() handler, it is pointing back to DOMWindow. It is interesting, however, that invoking toString() implicitly, it is scoped correctly. If I explicitly invoke toString() {error.toString}, then the scope jumps back to DOMWindow.

The only reason this is a problem, (why I cannot access error.st directly) is because the st array is actually stored in a Qooxdoo property, and I only have access to the generated getter. The above example mimics the actual object as simply as I can.

Is this a bug in dust.js? Is it losing the correct scope in handlers? Or am I missing something in the dust.js docs to retain scope?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

you could use it in this way:

{
 error: {
   st: 'a,b,d',
   msg: 'This is an error message',
   getStackTrace: function (chunk, context) {
     return context.current().error.st;
   },
   toString: function () {
     return this.msg;
   }
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct solution, but it doesn't necessarily solve my problem. I was hoping that the model object and the template/context would be completely separate. Thanks jairo! – schlomie Apr 27 '12 at 19:41
    
Although, the official [original] docs are wrong then: "Dust does not care how your reference objects are built. You may, for example, push prototyped objects onto the stack. The system leaves the this keyword intact when calling handler functions on your objects." -- under the heading 'Contexts' (akdubya.github.com/dustjs) – schlomie Apr 27 '12 at 20:16

this is Javascript isn't always obvious, especially when you are returning functions.

When Dust resolves references like {error.st} which is a function. It calls that function, but it does not set a scope for it; so it defaults to the global scope which in your browser is window.

Look at this line: https://github.com/akdubya/dustjs/blob/master/lib/dust.js#L319

Here is what is sorta happening:

var current_context = {
  st: 'a,b,d',
  msg: 'This is an error message',
  getStackTrace: function (chunk, context) {
    return error.st;
  },
  toString: function () {
    return this.msg;
  }
}
current_context.st(); // outputs correctly

var elem = current_context.st; // here is your reference {.}
elem(); // Dust tries to resolve your reference but it doesn't set the scope
elem.call(current_context); // if we pass the scope you'll get what you want.

Is this a bug in Dust? Probably not since you have the context via context.current().

Does it make sense for this to point to window. No, but when you use Dust on the server side I imagine, we'll have a better use for this.

share|improve this answer
    
In regards to "It calls that function, but it does not set a scope for it; so it defaults to the global scope which in your browser is window".... This is contradictory to the statement on the docs that 'this' remains intact. This from inside of a prototype method, this should always refer to the prototyped object. elem.call() will point back to the global scope, yes, so you could pass in the context using elem.call(context.) Why not elem.apply(context, [...]) ? This would preserve the correct scope. – schlomie Apr 27 '12 at 22:22
    
consider the following: var obj = { a: 'abc', method: function () { return this.a; }}; var b = obj.method; obj.method b.call(); /* undefined / b.apply(obj, []); / 'abc' */ This is the correct way to execute a closure and retain scope. – schlomie Apr 27 '12 at 22:47
    
Dust does not care how your reference objects are built. You may, for example, push prototyped objects onto the stack. The system leaves the this keyword intact when calling handler functions on your objects. – jimmyhchan Apr 29 '12 at 16:13
    
I'm not sure what the Dust author intended by the documentation you cited, but I'd tend to be wary of using 'this' since it is dependent on how it is invoked (yehudakatz.com/2011/08/11/…): Based solely on the fact that the examples do not use 'this' inside the context functions and the fact that the author gives you current context context.current(), one might interpret "'this' remains intact" to mean that 'this' doesn't get changed or scoped so that it still points to the global object. – jimmyhchan Apr 29 '12 at 16:35
    
Perhaps. However, since it specifically mentions pushing prototyped objects into the context, those prototyped object may use 'this' in methods, pointing to its enclosing object. I would hope dust.js meant to imply keeping 'this' intact for such cases, thus allowing for a clear separation between templating system and model objects. How it is written however, couples the model object and the templating system very tightly. You may be right on your interpretation of it though. To me, it just seems unfortunate. – schlomie Apr 30 '12 at 16:21

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