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I am struggling to model a scenario and came across a question that, while normalizing table should we consider FK also as key to determine whether a field should be in same table or other table?

For example, I have Users and Teams tables (One user may ZERO or more teams considering different sports).

Owner                                       Teams

 -----                                    -------- 
OwnerID ---PK                              TeamID  ---PK
OwnerName                                  OwnerID    ---FK  
                                          TeamManager
                                          TeamLogo

If we observe this relation, TeamManager and TeamLogo are completely dependent (functionally) on only TeamID not at all dependent UserID (am I correct in understanding this?). Should we have another table for UserID and TeamID to establish relationship?

Any suggestions would be really helpful.

This is not a home work. I am modeling for a website and improve my knowledge on normal forms to get best scalable database design.

Thank you,

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I don't see the relationship between teams and users. A team must have x number of users to be a full team. x depends on the sport. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Apr 26 '12 at 19:19
    
@GilbertLeBlanc, Users might not be correct terminology. Assume it is Owner. I will update question. So, it is legal to have a multiple teams for a Owner. –  Nambari Apr 26 '12 at 19:20
    
It would depend on the sport. In USA professional sports, the answer is no within a sport, but yes when considering different sports. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Apr 26 '12 at 19:24
    
@GilbertLeBlanc, yes considering different sports. –  Nambari Apr 26 '12 at 19:28
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

... should we consider FK also as key to determine whether a field should be in same table or other table?

Being a child endpoint of a referential integrity is orthogonal to being a key (i.e. FK child may or may not be a key). The name "foreign key" only refers to the parent endpoint, which is required to be a key (in most DBMSes).

So, in your example, Teams.OwnerID does not have to be a key (and actually isn't, judging on your description).

If we observe this relation, TeamManager and TeamLogo are completely dependent (functionally) on only TeamID not at all dependent UserID (am I correct in understanding this?).

Yes, you are correct.

The Teams is in 3NF because all attributes functionally depend on key, whole key and nothing but the key (so help me Codd ;) ).

Here is why:

  • Nothing depends on a key subset, so this is 2NF (in fact, there is no "key subset" since key is just one attribute).
  • As you already noted, TeamManager and TeamLogo do not functionally depend on OwnerID, so you do not have a transitive dependency, so this is 3NF.

Should we have another table for UserID and TeamID to establish relationship?

For modeling a simple 1:N relationship like this: no.

Modeling M:N would be a different matter.


So unless there are some additional details you didn't mention, this model looks nicely normalized to me.

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+1 good analysis and explanation. –  NealB Apr 26 '12 at 20:04
    
Hi, Great Answer. I have a question, if I make TeamId and OWnerId as composite primary key, does this design still stand? I think it violates 2nd NF right? Which cases we may need to make FK as part of composite PK in general? –  Nambari Apr 26 '12 at 20:11
    
@thinksteep If the TeamManager and TeamLogo continue to not functionally depend on OwnerID, then yes, this would violate 2NF (because there is a dependency to a proper subset of a key). However, if you wanted to model a situation where these fields depend on a combination of TeamID and OwnerID, then this would not violate 2NF. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Apr 26 '12 at 20:21
    
Great thanks! Now I am clear. –  Nambari Apr 26 '12 at 20:26
    
@thinksteep To answer your other question: child endpoint of FK is part of key for identifying relationships. In your particular case, if there was a situation where it was desirable to use the same TeamID for different OwnerIDs, this would warrant a composite PK in Teams and the relationship would be identifying (as opposed to non-identifying relationship that you have now). In other words, ask yourself: can you identify an entity independently from its parent? If yes (which you have here since TeamID is unique), this is non-identifying relationship. If no, then it is identifying. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Apr 26 '12 at 20:30
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I I do not see a reason to have a third table for UserId and TeamId. Now if you have more infromation for TeamManager I would create a manager table. Is it one user per team? Can a user be a Manager?

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Assume TeamManager as simple varchar(which don't require no more normalization). I am not really worried there. My question was more towards on TeamManager and Logo are related to only TeamID not UserID. As per second normal form, field should be related to key. that is part I am trying to understand here. –  Nambari Apr 26 '12 at 19:20
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