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I'm new at CoffeeScript and I'm having trouble understanding some syntax of it.

For example, in this function call:

e('')
    .color('rgb(255,0,0)')
    .attr( x: 20,
           y: 100,
           w: 10,
           h: 100 )

I'm expecting this to compile JS code that passes an object with keys x, y, w, h to attr method. But this code actually compiles to this:

e('').color('rgb(255,0,0)').attr({
  x: 20
}, {
  y: 100,
  w: 10,
  h: 100
});

It's passing two objects to attr, first with key x, and second with keys y, w, and h. I'm having trouble understanding why is x separated from other keys, but other keys are not separated from each other?

Since I want to pass attr method one object, I tried this:

e('')
    .color('rgb(255,0,0)')
    .attr({x: 20,
           y: 100,
           w: 10,
           h: 100})

But this gives me that compile error in the line that y: 100 gets place: Error: Parse error on line 4: Unexpected '{'. The strange thing is, there is no { in line 4. I also tried removing parens in attr but still got the same error.

I can solved it with this:

e('')
    .color('rgb(255,0,0)')
    .attr(
           x: 20,
           y: 100,
           w: 10,
           h: 100)

If I remove the newline after .attr(, then I'm getting the same code in my first example, which is not what I want.

Now I'm wondering if I'm misunderstanding some points in CoffeeScript syntax or there are really strange stuff in it. Or did I catch a bug in CoffeeScript? Any ideas?

I'm using CoffeeScript 1.3.1

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3 Answers 3

In coffeescript whitespace is significant. You can't just line things up whereever you think they should go. Try something like this:

e('')
  .color('rgb(255,0,0)')
  .attr(
    x: 20
    y: 100
    w: 10
    h: 100
  )

Edit: If you want to have x on the same line as the method call you just need to indent properly:

e('')
    .color('rgb(255,0,0)')
    .attr(x: 20,
    y: 100,
    w: 10,
    h: 100)
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, so removing comma in object literals works. Thanks. I'm still looking for an answer of my compiler error and why only x is separated from other keys in my first example. –  sinan Apr 26 '12 at 19:49
    
I believe the reason it got separated is because the first parameter was placed on the same line as the method call. And the newline makes the compiler assume a second set of variables. This assumption works well for methods with this kind of signature methodName(param1, param2, objOrCallback) –  Sandro Apr 26 '12 at 19:54
    
The reason why x is separated is because of the significant whitespace. You indented it wrong. –  david Apr 26 '12 at 19:56
    
@Sandro, I'm not sure. : character is not valid in parameter syntax. It shouldn't be interpreted as a parameter. –  sinan Apr 26 '12 at 19:56
    
Sure it's valid, it just means you're creating an object. –  david Apr 26 '12 at 19:57

This is what you're looking for:

e('')
  .color('rgb(255,0,0)')
  .attr
    x:20
    y:100
    w:10
    h:100

which compiles to:

e('').color('rgb(255,0,0)').attr({
  x: 20,
  y: 100,
  w: 10,
  h: 100
});

remember, CoffeeScript is all about simplicity and avoiding curly braces and commas...

share|improve this answer
    
except when avoiding curly braces & commas degrades readability. Though it is not the case here, it's easy to cross the line & join the dark side –  ksol Apr 27 '12 at 7:27
    
Overdoing is never a good thing. My point was that CoffeeScript is something like a 'Python for JS'. –  Alladinian Apr 27 '12 at 7:37

The obvious solution would be to put your object on one line, as in .attr({x: 20, y: 100, w: 10, h: 100}). (Haven't tested it though, but I don't see why it would not work).

While you can sometimes not use the brackets, I prefer to use them in functions calls as I find it more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
Sure, this works. I already have a working code in hand but I'm wondering why compiler gives the error to my second example, and how can I pass an object if I have dozens of elements in it so I have to split in to lines. –  sinan Apr 26 '12 at 19:41

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