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I wrote an answer to this question: Fetch content of next td on checkbox click, the answer was accepted (as of writing this question).

The intent was to find the text-value of the table-cell following the current cell that contained the input checkbox; for the second row this works (in Chrome 18/WinXP), but in the first row the evaluation console.log(that.checked); evaluates to false (regardless, so far as I can see, of it being checked or not).

The supplied HTML:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <input type=checkbox name=t>
        </td>
        <td width=25%>
            FOOBAR
        </td>
        <td width=73%>
            BAZ
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <input type=checkbox name=t>
        </td>
        <td width=25%>
            FOO
        </td>
        <td width=73%>
            BAR
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

And my JavaScript:

var c = [];

c = window.document.getElementsByTagName('input');

for (var i = 0; i < c.length; i++) {
    var that = c[i];
    if (that.type == 'checkbox') {
        that.onchange = function() {
            console.log(that.checked);
            if (that.checked){
                console.log(that.parentNode.nextElementSibling.firstChild.nodeValue.trim());
            }
        };
    }
}​

JS Fiddle demo.

Note that it seems to work reliably for the second row (and logs FOO to the console), but in the first row the console logs only false. Is there an obvious mistake I'm making?

share|improve this question
    
You're getting your this and that confused. –  j08691 Apr 26 '12 at 20:41
    
Always the way; there are times we should just know to stop. Or take a bit of a break. Oops. =) –  David Thomas Apr 26 '12 at 20:42
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're actually running into an issue unrelated to checked. Your that variable is outside the scope of the event handler, and so it is always resolving to c[1]. You need to either wrap the thing in a closure (aka function () { ... }(); or just change that to this inside your event handler, like in this: http://jsfiddle.net/z88HH/3/

for (var i = 0; i < c.length; i++) {
    var that = c[i];
    if (that.type == 'checkbox') {
        that.onchange = function() {
            console.log(this.checked);
            if (this.checked){
                console.log(this.parentNode.nextElementSibling.firstChild.nodeValue.trim());
            }
        };
    }
}​
share|improve this answer
    
I feel such a fool...so, inappropriately caching ones variables is...not always a great idea, then. Oops. Thank you! =) –  David Thomas Apr 26 '12 at 20:41
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Isn't that always the last row e.g. try console.log(that, that.checked) , wrap it in a closure see your edited jsFiddle

for (var i = 0; i < c.length; i++) {

    if (c[i].type == 'checkbox') {
        c[i].onchange = function(){ 
            var that = c[i];                    
            return function() {
            console.log(that, that.checked);
            if (that.checked){
                console.log(that.parentNode.nextElementSibling.firstChild.nodeValue.trim());
            }
    }}();
    }
}​
share|improve this answer
    
Yep. That's the thing; thanks. I feel so silly, now... XD –  David Thomas Apr 26 '12 at 20:42
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