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I'm trying to take rows in a table describing outages and break them, via a calculated time range, into separate rows to be inserted into another table to describe hour by hour time periods in each given range.

The below code gives us the following output:

We went from this row (original data):

OutageDate        StartTime                 EndTime             Duration
2010-11-10  16:00:00.0000000    17:30:00.0000000    90

To this after I run the stored proc (THIS IS THE DESIRED OUTPUT! I just need to know how to save it to a table):

OutageDate   StartHour StartMinutes  EndHour EndMinutes    StartTime        EndTime       Duration
2010-11-10  16   0       17       0        16:00:00.0000000     17:30:00.0000000    90
2010-11-10  17  30       18       0        16:00:00.0000000     17:30:00.0000000    90

The following is the code i need to figure out how to save to a table once i split my rows out across the time values I want. I don't have control over why this has to happen, it just needs to as per a request by someone higher than me and specified by them in this format:

--First, let's look at the original data in the table...just one row will do

SELECT TOP (1) *
  FROM actualTable
  ORDER BY OutageDate ASC

--Begin sproc logic
declare @OutageDate date
declare @StartTime time(7)
declare @EndTime time(7)
declare @StartHour bigint
declare @EndHour int
declare @StartMinute int
declare @EndMinute int
declare @Duration int

declare @Temp_StartTime time
declare @Temp_EndTime time
declare @temp_StartHour int
declare @temp_EndHour int
declare @temp_StartMinute int
declare @temp_EndMinute int


SELECT TOP(1) @OutageDate = OutageDate, @StartTime = StartTime, @EndTime = EndTime, @Duration = Duration FROM actualTable


SET @Temp_StartTime=@StartTime
SET @Temp_EndTime=@EndTime
SET @temp_StartHour=DATEPART(HOUR, @StartTime)
SET @temp_EndHour=DATEPART(HOUR, @EndTime)
SET @temp_StartMinute=DATEPART(MI, @StartTime)
SET @temp_EndMinute=DATEPART(MI, @EndTime)

PRINT @temp_StartHour
PRINT @temp_EndHour
PRINT @temp_StartMinute
PRINT @StartTime
PRINT @EndTime

if(@temp_EndMinute>0)
    BEGIN
        SET @temp_EndHour=@temp_EndHour+1
    END

--this declares the temp table 

DECLARE @Temp_Table TABLE
(
OutageDate date,
StartHour int,
StartMinute int,
EndHour int,
EndMinute int,
StartTime time,
EndTime time,
Duration int
)

--Here's the loop that inserts the rows

While((@temp_EndHour-@temp_StartHour>1))
    BEGIN
       INSERT INTO @Temp_Table
       SELECT 
            @OutageDate AS OutageDate,  
           (DATEPART(HOUR, @Temp_StartTime)) AS StartHour,
           (DATEPART(MINUTE, @Temp_StartTime)) AS StartMinute, 
            @temp_StartHour+1 AS EndHour, 
            0 AS EndMinute,
            @StartTime as StartTime, 
            @EndTime as EndTime,
           @Duration AS Duration


--DATEADD returns a specified date with the specified number interval (signed integer) added to a specified datepart of that date.

        SET @temp_StartHour=@temp_StartHour+1
        SET @Temp_StartTime=DATEADD(HOUR,1,@Temp_StartTime)

--Let's make sure we account for the minutes in the first and last hours if any

        if(DATEPART(MI, @Temp_StartTime)!=0)
            BEGIN
                SET @Temp_StartTime=DATEADD(MI,-@Temp_StartMinute,@Temp_StartTime)
            END
    END

--Ok, if we're at the last row insertion, we still need the minutes the outage finished at...those go into StartMinutes

    WHile((@temp_EndHour-@temp_StartHour=1))
    BEGIN
       INSERT INTO @Temp_Table
       SELECT 
       @OutageDate AS OutageDate, 
       (DATEPART(HOUR, @Temp_StartTime)) AS StartHour, 
       @temp_EndMinute AS StartMinute, 
       @temp_StartHour+1 AS EndHour, 
      0 AS EndMinute, 
      @StartTime as StartTime, 
       @EndTime as EndTime,
       @Duration AS Duration

--DATEADD returns a specified date with the specified number interval (signed integer) added to a specified datepart of that date.

        SET @temp_StartHour=@temp_StartHour+1
        SET @Temp_StartTime=DATEADD(HOUR,1,@Temp_StartTime)

--Let's make sure we account for the minutes in the first and last hours if any

        if(DATEPART(MI, @Temp_StartTime)!=0)
            BEGIN
                SET @Temp_StartTime=DATEADD(MI,-@temp_StartMinute,@Temp_StartTime)
            END
    END

--Need to add logic that drops and recreates the table from the temp table so we don't have to employ a cursor

SELECT * FROM @Temp_Table

BEGIN
SELECT * INTO newTable FROM @Temp_Table
END

IF YOU RUN THIS STRAIGHT IN SMS, You'll get the logic at its most basic:

declare @StartTime time
declare @EndTime time
declare @Temp_StartTime time

declare @temp_StartHour int
declare @temp_EndHour int
declare @temp_StartMinute int
declare @temp_EndMinute int

SET @StartTime='2:30:00'
SET @EndTime='4:01:00'
SET @Temp_StartTime=@StartTime

SET @temp_StartHour=DATEPART(HOUR, @StartTime)
SET @temp_EndHour=DATEPART(HOUR, @EndTime)
SET @temp_StartMinute=DATEPART(MI, @StartTime)
SET @temp_EndMinute=DATEPART(MI, @EndTime)

if(@temp_EndMinute>0)
    BEGIN
        SET @temp_EndHour=@temp_EndHour+1
    END

DECLARE @Temp_Table TABLE
(
  StartHour int,
  StartMinute int,
  EndHour int,
  EndMinute int,
  StartTime time,
  EndTime time
)

WHile((@temp_EndHour-@temp_StartHour>=1))
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO @Temp_Table
        SELECT (DATEPART(HOUR, @Temp_StartTime)) AS StartHour,(DATEPART(MINUTE, @Temp_StartTime)) AS StartMinute,
        @temp_StartHour+1 AS EndHour, 
        0 AS EndMinute, @StartTime as StartTime, @EndTime as EndTime

        SET @temp_StartHour=@temp_StartHour+1
        SET @Temp_StartTime=DATEADD(HOUR,1,@Temp_StartTime)

        if(DATEPART(MI, @Temp_StartTime)!=0)
            BEGIN
                SET @Temp_StartTime=DATEADD(MI,-@temp_StartMinute,@Temp_StartTime)
            END
    END

SELECT * FROM @Temp_Table 
share|improve this question
    
Reverse engineering your code is going to be quite time consuming. Instead of giving us the query that doesn't work, can you show us some source rows in actualTable and what rows they would produce in the destination? As I mentioned in your other question, I truly believe the logic you're using above is far more complicated than it has to be. But I can't tell if I can't see the source data and what you're trying to get out of it. – Aaron Bertrand Apr 26 '12 at 21:30
    
Ok...Let me edit this one then. Thanks. – Lynn Apr 26 '12 at 21:44
    
Can you add to your sample data (and obviously the desired results) the row where start time was 22:15 and end time was 00:30, so we can understand what output is expected when the start and end times occurred on different days? – Aaron Bertrand Apr 26 '12 at 22:53
    
The second line of data is my desired output. I'm good with it all. There are only two lines in the whole database that have military midnight, as it turns out. The most pressing issue for me, right now, is to just simply save the results into a brand new table. i need to know how and when to insert the rows I get into a table. There are 400 lines in the table I'll be iterating through to split lines into multiples to reflect the time break out. – Lynn Apr 26 '12 at 23:07
    
Also if an outage starts at 17:00 and ends at 18:00, do you expect one row or two? – Aaron Bertrand Apr 26 '12 at 23:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, some set up:

USE tempdb;
GO

CREATE TABLE dbo.Outages
(
    OutageDate DATE,
    StartTime TIME(7),
    EndTime TIME(7),
    Duration INT
);

INSERT dbo.Outages SELECT '20101110', '16:00', '17:30', 90;
/*
-- I also tested these cases, and *think* it still produces what you expect:
INSERT dbo.Outages SELECT '20101111', '13:00', '14:02', 62;
INSERT dbo.Outages SELECT '20101112', '17:00', '18:00', 60;
INSERT dbo.Outages SELECT '20101113', '16:05', '16:25', 20;
INSERT dbo.Outages SELECT '20101114', '16:59', '18:01', 62;
INSERT dbo.Outages SELECT '20101115', '22:15', '01:30', 165;
*/

Now, the query:

;WITH n(n) AS 
(
  SELECT TOP 24 ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY [object_id])
  FROM sys.objects
),
x AS
(
  SELECT 
    o.OutageDate, StartHour = (DATEPART(HOUR, StartTime) + n.n - 1) % 24,
    StartTime, EndTime, Duration,
    rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY o.OutageDate, o.StartTime ORDER BY n.n)
  FROM n INNER JOIN dbo.Outages AS o
  ON n.n <= CEILING(DATEDIFF(MINUTE, CONVERT(DATETIME, StartTime), 
    DATEADD(DAY, CASE WHEN EndTime < StartTime THEN 1 ELSE 0 END, 
    CONVERT(DATETIME, EndTime)))/60.0)
 ),
 mx AS (SELECT OutageDate, StartTime, minrn = MIN(rn), maxrn = MAX(rn) 
   FROM x GROUP BY OutageDate, StartTime)

 -- insert into some other table
 SELECT 
    x.OutageDate, 
    x.StartHour, 
    StartMinutes = CASE 
      WHEN x.rn = mx.minrn THEN DATEPART(MINUTE, x.StartTime) ELSE 0 END,
    EndHour = x.StartHour + 1, 
    EndMinutes = CASE
      WHEN x.rn = mx.maxrn THEN DATEPART(MINUTE, x.EndTime) ELSE 0 END,
    x.StartTime, 
    x.EndTime,
    x.Duration
 FROM x INNER JOIN mx 
 ON x.OutageDate = mx.OutageDate
 AND x.StartTime = mx.StartTime
 ORDER BY x.OutageDate, x.rn;
GO

When you're happy that it is giving you the right rows for the various scenarios, then replace

-- insert into some other table

With an actual insert, e.g.

INSERT dbo.OtherTable(col1, col2, ...)

If you're trying to create a brand new table from this output, then replace

FROM x INNER JOIN mx

With an INTO clause, e.g.

INTO dbo.MyNewTable FROM x INNER JOIN mx

Don't forget to clean up:

DROP TABLE dbo.Outages;
share|improve this answer
    
hey man, that's pretty nice. I think does redo my logic on the time calcs really nicely. Super! Also, it saves it into a temp table going forward. I think with your instructions I can hopefully connect the rest of the dots. Today has definitely been a crash course in my revisiting TSQL after 7 years of being away from it. – Lynn Apr 26 '12 at 23:59
    
Also, thanks very much for the time you gave the issue. Very much appreciated. Sorry if I didn't see where you were heading with the answer. – Lynn Apr 27 '12 at 0:14
    
What does this mean or do? "WITH n(n) AS " – Lynn Apr 27 '12 at 8:59
    
That is a common table expression. In this case it is used to create an ad hoc table of numbers which I use to number the hours between startTime and endTime. – Aaron Bertrand Apr 27 '12 at 11:11
    
Thanks. I sat down with this all last night and really learned a lot from it. Efficiently written and now that I've played with it for awhile, I'm really happy with it. I'm interested in reading more about this approach of using the CTE. I never would have gotten there on my own.... – Lynn Apr 27 '12 at 18:35

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