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I've been struggling with low-level manual loop optimization in GHC. My program contains some loops that perform numerical computation. The real data is wrapped in other data structures, and the program is broken down into "looping control flow functions" and "computation functions" in such a way that some data structure fields end up being read inside inner loops. I want GHC to move those reads out of the inner loops. Here's a simplified version of the code, to show what's going on.

data D = D !Double !C
data C = C Double

-- This function is called in every loop iteration.
-- Parameter 'c' is loop-invariant.
exampleLoopBody i a c =
  case c of C b -> a + b * fromIntegral i

-- The body of this function is a counted loop that should be optimized
foo x =
  case x
  of D acc0 c ->
    let loop i acc =
          if i > 100
          then acc
          else loop (i+1) (exampleLoopBody i acc c)
    in loop 0 acc0

Every loop iteration evaluates case c of C b, but that is redundant computation because c is loop-invariant. I can make GHC lift it out by putting a redundant case expression outside the loop:

foo x =
  case x
  of D acc0 c ->
    case c             -- This case statement inserted for optimization purposes
    of C b -> b `seq`  -- It will read 'b' outside of the loop
      let loop i acc =
           if i > 100
           then acc
           else loop (i+1) (exampleLoopBody i acc c)
      in loop 0 acc0

The compiler inlines exampleLoopBody. Afterward, the inner case statement is redundant and gets eliminated:

foo x =
  case x
  of D acc0 c ->
    case c
    of C b -> b `seq`
      let loop i acc =
            if i > 100
            then acc
            else loop (i+1) (acc + b * fromIntegral i) -- The inlined case expression disappears
      in loop 0 acc0

The purpose of seq is to ensure that the case expression is not dead code. The seq checks whether b is _|_. GHC notices that, since b has been computed, it is useful to reuse that value in the loop body.

Now, here is the problem: I really want all the relevant data fields to be strict. If I insert strictness annotations in the data definition, like this,

data C = C !Double

then the seq and case c of C b have no effect as far as GHC is concerned. GHC deletes them, and I get this:

foo x =
  case x
  of D acc0 c ->
    let loop i acc =
          if i > 100
          then acc
          else loop (i+1) (case c of C b -> acc + b * fromIntegral i) -- Evaluate the case in every iteration
     in loop 0 acc0

This code evaluates case c of C b in every iteration, which is just what I was trying to avoid.

If I can't rely on seq, I don't know how else to force b to be computed outside the loop body. Is there some trick I can use in this case?

share|improve this question
    
Which GHC version are you using? I get nice core without case in every iteration from 7.4.1 and 7.2.2. Pure unboxed Double#s. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 26 '12 at 21:44
    
@DanielFischer I'm using 7.0.3 and one of the Doubles is boxed after going through the simplifier. FYI, my real use case actually involves statically-sized vectors such as Cons Double (Cons Double Nil). I can try running it in a newer GHC to see what happens. –  Heatsink Apr 26 '12 at 22:24
    
Hmm, I get an unboxed loop with 7.0.4 too. The $wfoo worker has a boxed argument (also with 7.4.1 and 7.2.2), but the loop itself is letreced inside that and takes an unboxed Double# (the other Double# is made static, even). –  Daniel Fischer Apr 26 '12 at 22:34
    
Yes, $wfoo has one boxed argument for me, and the loop takes and returns unboxed Double#s. The boxed argument of $wfoo is unboxed by a case inside the loop body. –  Heatsink Apr 26 '12 at 22:39
    
For me, the case is outside the loop body. Could it be a 32-bit vs. 64-bit thing? What's your OS? –  Daniel Fischer Apr 26 '12 at 22:49

2 Answers 2

You could try rearranging the arguments and moving the loop variant parts into a lambda:

-- note the order of the arguments changed
exampleLoopBody (C b) =
  \i a -> a + b * fromIntegral i

foo (D acc0 c) =
    let
       loopBody = exampleLoopBody c 
       loop i acc =
          if i > 100
         then acc
         else loop (i+1) (loopBody i acc)
   in loop 0 acc0

Also, this code builds up a large unevaluated expression at the moment so you may want to force the accumulator parameter every time through the loop.

share|improve this answer

This looks like basically the entire reason newtype was put in the language. Just change data C = C !Double to newtype C = C Double and write the naive version of the code. All case expressions on values of type C will be erased. As a side note, the code pattern you have in your examples:

case foo of
    D acc0 c -> case c of
        C b -> ...

can be more succinctly written:

case foo of
    D acc0 (C b) -> ...
share|improve this answer
    
I may have simplified my problem too much when asking the question. In the real program, foo is a polymorphic function. The type of c varies and it may have more than one field. –  Heatsink Apr 26 '12 at 22:33

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