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I have 3 forms in my winforms project and all of them have a button that fires the same code of opening Form2. I need to centralize the code by putting this code on a class file inside the same project or by putting it into a seperate class library. Right now the code is inside the same form as below:

frm1 entryform = (frm1)Application.OpenForms["frm1"];

if (entryform == null)
{
    entryform = new frmMainMenu();
}
entryform.StartPosition = FormStartPosition.Manual;
entryform.Location = this.Location;
entryform.Show();

this.close();

When I move this code from the Form1, Form2, Form3 to a common form I can't access the calling form to replace the line this.close(); Is there a property like Method.CallingForm.Close() or something in c#? Please help

I don't want to pass the form as Parameter. The form is too heavy to be passed. Any other alternative?

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I don't want to pass the form as Parameter. The form is too heavy to be passed. Any other alternative? –  Enggr Apr 26 '12 at 22:48
2  
This is a Really Bad Idea. Trivially solve your problem by having the form call its own Close() method instead before the call. –  Hans Passant Apr 26 '12 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

You don't need to be worried about passing the form as a parameter because it is heavy.

A form is a reference type and will not cause any performance deterioration.

If you want to consider best practices, you should have your central class fire an event when it needs the form closed.

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Pass the form as a parameter.

The form in NOT to heavy to be passed because all you ever pass is a reference to the form, not the entire form.

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