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I have an algorithm that performs a breadth-first search of resources:

def crawl(starting_node)
  items=[starting_node]
  until items.empty?
    item = items.shift
    kids = item.slow_network_action # takes seconds
    kids.each{ |kid| items << kid }
  end
end

I'd like to use a few concurrent threads to parallelize the slow_network_action.
What's a reasonable way to do this?

Here's a technique that works, but I feel certain is not the right approach:

def crawl(starting_node)
  mutex = Mutex.new
  items = [starting_node]
  4.times.map{
    loop do
      unless item=mutex.synchronize{ items.shift }
        sleep LONGER_THAN_LONGEST_NETWORK_ACTION
        break unless item=mutex.synchronize{ items.shift }
      end
      kids = item.slow_network_action
      mutex.synchronize{
        kids.each{ |kid| items << kid }
      }
    end
  }.each(&:join)
end

I'd like to do something like have the threads actually sleep while waiting for an item to be added to the queue, wake up when an item is added, and have all threads exit when everyone is waiting, when none have been added.


This alternate code almost works but for the deadlocks that can (and do) occur, and the total lack of a proper exit strategy:

require 'thread'
def crawl(starting_node)
  items = Queue.new
  items << starting_node
  4.times.map{
    while item=items.shift
      kids = item.slow_network_action
      kids.each{ |kid| items << kid }
    end
  }.each(&:join)
end
share|improve this question
    
You need to look into monitors and condition variables: ruby-doc.org/stdlib-1.9.3/libdoc/monitor/rdoc/Monitor.html. I’d write a more detailed answer, but I’m going to bed. – matt Apr 27 '12 at 2:13
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should point you in the right direction:

require 'monitor'

NUM_THREADS = 4

def crawl(starting_node)
  items = [starting_node]
  items.extend MonitorMixin
  item_cond = items.new_cond

  threads = []
  working_threads = 0
  finished = false

  NUM_THREADS.times do
    items.synchronize do
      working_threads += 1
    end
    threads << Thread.new do
      item = nil
      kids = []
      loop do
        items.synchronize do

          #add any new items to array
          items.concat kids

          if (items.empty? && working_threads == 1)
            #all other threads are waiting, and there's no more items
            #to process, so we must be done
            finished = true
          end

          #wake up all waiting threads, either to finish or do more work
          #watch out for thundering herds
          item_cond.broadcast unless (items.empty? && !finished)

          #wait, but first decrement count of working threads
          #so we can determine when to finish
          working_threads -= 1
          item_cond.wait_while { items.empty? && !finished}
          Thread.exit if finished
          working_threads += 1

          #get next item
          item = items.shift
        end

        kids = item.slow_network_action
      end

    end
  end

  threads.each(&:join)
end

This makes the items array into a monitor and does any synchronization through that, along with an asociated ConditionVariable created from the monitor.

This is similiar to how a Queue works internally, except that this also checks for when all work is finished (which actually adds a bit of complexity).

The threads main loop starts with an empty kids array that gets added to items in order to avoid needing two separate synchronized blocks in the loop, and the race conditions that would go with them.

Note that this uses broadcast which causes all waiting threads to wake, and could potentially cause a thundering herd. I don't think this should cause any problems here. The alternative would be to add the elements of kids one at a time, and call signal for each one. This would add more complexity for dealing with the case when all work is finished though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this; I'll have to read, test, and digest this before you get the acceptance mark, but it's looking reasonable. – Phrogz Apr 27 '12 at 21:49

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