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In Java, is it possible to attempt a cast and get back null if the cast fails?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 44 down vote accepted
public static <T> T as(Class<T> t, Object o) {
  return t.isInstance(o) ? t.cast(o) : null;
}

Usage:

MyType a = as(MyType.class, new MyType());   
// 'a' is not null

MyType b = as(MyType.class, "");   
// b is null
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@erickson: This is perfect! +10 if I could ( I knew generic could be used here :P ) I added a sample usage , feel free to rollback if you feel like. –  OscarRyz Jun 23 '09 at 18:37
    
+1 for compile-time safety –  dfa Jun 23 '09 at 18:42
1  
Good design, but isn't it better to use isAssignableFrom in cases like this. –  C. Ross Nov 1 '11 at 13:50
1  
@erickson It just handles a few more edge cases. See Q496928 –  C. Ross Nov 1 '11 at 16:52
1  
@BrainSlugs83 It sounds like this method falls a bit short of the real as operator then, because it will not perform any sort of type coercion. As for C. Ross's comment, his suggestion has nothing to do with that issue, and he failed to explain any benefit in it. –  erickson Jul 30 '13 at 23:47

You can use the instanceof keyword to determine if you can cast correctly.

return obj instanceof String?(String)obj: null;

Of course it can be genericied and made into the function, but I think question was about what means Java have to accomplish this.

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1  
I'm not sure that's what shoosh wants. Probably a more generic way to treat the cast is needed. This would be the perfect answer for "How do I validated my object is instance of a given class" though :) –  OscarRyz Jun 23 '09 at 18:26
    
Needs an "else" clause... –  Michael Myers Jun 23 '09 at 18:58
1  
I think we are not here to solve problems for others, but provide guidance. So pointing the right direction should be enough. –  eugener Jun 23 '09 at 23:45

You can, but not with a single function in Java:

public B nullCast(Object a) {

  if (a instanceof B) {
     return (B) a;
  } else {
     return null;
  }
}

EDIT: Note that you can't make the B class generic (for this example) without adding the target class (this has to do with the fact that a generic type is not available to instanceof):

public <V, T extends V> T cast(V obj, Class<T> cls) {
  if (cls.isInstance(obj)) {
    return cls.cast(obj);
  } else {
    return null;
  }
}
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Yes, but I was giving the general idea, not a specific method. –  Kathy Van Stone Jun 23 '09 at 18:35
MyType e = ( MyType ) orNull( object, MyType.class );
// if "object" is not an instanceof MyType, then e will be null.

...

public static Object orNull( Object o , Class type ) { 
    return type.isIntance( o ) ? o : null;
}

I guess this could somehow done with generics also but I think but probably is not what is needed.

This simple method receives Object and returns Object because the cast is performed in the method client.

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AFAIK, this would be (one) of the ways to do that:

SomeClassToCastTo object = null;
try {
  SomeClassToCastTo object = SomeClassToCastTo.class.cast(anotherObject);
}
catch (ClassCastException e) {
  object = null;
}

Ugly, but it should do what you want...

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That's not a good case for using the reflective "cast()" method. See stackoverflow.com/questions/243811/… for more info. –  erickson Jun 23 '09 at 18:24
    
Agreed, I had a brain fart and forgot about the instanceof operator. –  Peter Jun 23 '09 at 18:31
1  
creating an exception in this case could be avoided. exceptions are objects, so it's nice not to create them unnecessarily. –  cd1 Jun 23 '09 at 18:36

In Java if a cast fails you will get a ClassCastException. You can catch the exception and set the target object to null.

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You can either catch the exception:

Foo f = null;
try {
  f = Foo(bar);
}
catch (ClassCastException e) {}

or check the type:

Foo f = null;
if (bar instanceof Foo)
  f = (Foo)bar;
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2  
Empty catch blocks are a very bad habit... actually, I think the compiler should slap you in the face when you do it ;). And anyway, you should never rely on exceptions for something you can check without an exception being thrown. –  Thomas Levesque Jun 23 '09 at 18:26
2  
Which is why I also gave the version without an exception. –  Pesto Jun 23 '09 at 18:40

The two solutions above are somewhat awkward:

Casting and catching ClassCastException: creating the exception object can be expensive (e.g. computing the stack trace).

The nullCast method described earlier means you need a cast method for each cast you want to perform.

Generics fail you because of "type erasure" ...

You can create a static helper method that is guaranteed to return an instance of your target class or null, and then cast the result without fear of exception:

public static Object nullCast(Object source, Class target) {
    if (target.isAssignableFrom(source.getClass())) {
        return target.cast(source);
    } else {
        return null;
    }
}

Sample call:

Foo fooInstance = (Foo) nullCast(barInstance, Foo.class);
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you can handle this catching ClassCastException

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2  
Every time an Exception gets thrown, there's a lot of overhead involved. That's why Exceptions should be just that--an "exception." Exception handling should be reserved for events that are truly exceptional. When exceptions become the rule, you're programming wrong. Far better to use type checking. –  StriplingWarrior Jun 23 '09 at 19:48

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