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I am developing a console app.

I want to use a Threadpool to perform web downloads. Here is some fake code.

 for (int loop=0; loop< 100; loop++)
 {
     ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(GetPage), pageList[loop]);
 }


snip

private static void GetPage(object o)
{
    //get the page
}

How do I prevent my code from starting more than two (or ten, or whatever) simultaneous threads?

I have tried

    ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads(1, 0);
    ThreadPool.SetMinThreads(1, 0);

But they seem to have no impact.

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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would use Parallel.For and set MaxDegreeOfParallelism accordingly.

Parallel.For(0, 1000, new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 10 },
  i =>
  {
    GetPage(pageList[i]);
  });
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Personally, I would use SmartThreadPool and leave the ThreadPool alone. However, this is probably what you want: C# thread pool limiting threads

Included code from link (please give the original author credit, not me)

System.Threading.Semaphore S = new System.Threading.Semaphore(3, 3);  
try 
{     
  // wait your turn (decrement)     
  S.WaitOne();     
  // do your thing 
}  
finally 
{     
  // release so others can go (increment)     
  S.Release(); 
} 
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Description

You can do this using the ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads method.

But there are some problems using the ThreadPool for WebRequest. Read, for example, this (Bug in ThreadPool or HttpWebRequest?)

Sample

ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads(2,2);

Edit

Personally i would use AsParallel from Linq, for this.

More Information

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You need to be careful, however. Threadpool worker threads are often used for other purposes. For example, in a web application, ThreadPool workers process web requests. –  Erik Funkenbusch Apr 26 '12 at 22:05
1  
FYI... this limits the total number of threads in the IIS ThreadPool, so basically users won't be able to access your site. This code should live on a separate website with it's own threadpool. –  Chris Gessler Apr 26 '12 at 22:06
    
Added more detail to question –  Bryan Apr 26 '12 at 22:09
    
My answer is updated. –  dknaack Apr 26 '12 at 22:13
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Look at the parameters of ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads. The first parameter is the amount of worker threads and the second parameter is the amount of async threads, which is which one you're talking about.

Further down the documentation, it says:

You cannot set the number of worker threads or the number of I/O completion threads to a number smaller than the number of processors in the computer.

It sounds like you're trying to use the ThreadPool for something it's not intended to be used for. If you want to limit the amount of downloads create a class that manages this for you, because the ThreadPool isn't necessarily the complete solution to your problem.

I'd suggest a class that starts two threads in the ThreadPool and waits for the callback. When it receives a callback for the completion of one of the threads queue a new one.

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If you are tighten to .Net 2.0 you can use the following technique:

knowing the fact that whey you enqueue a task to the ThreadPool it will create a new thread (of course if there're no free ones), you'll wait before doing this until there's a free thread. For this purpose the BlockingCounter class is used (described below) that once the limit is reached will wait to increment until someone (another thread) decrements it. Then it's entered "closed" state indicating that no new Increments will be done and waits for completion.

Below is the sample that shows a maximum of 4 tasks with the total number of 10.

class Program
{

    static int s_numCurrentThreads = 0;

    static Random s_rnd = new Random();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        int maxParallelTasks = 4;
        int totalTasks = 10;

        using (BlockingCounter blockingCounter = new BlockingCounter(maxParallelTasks))
        {
            for (int i = 1; i <= totalTasks; i++)
            {

                Console.WriteLine("Submitting task {0}", i);
                blockingCounter.WaitableIncrement();
                if (!ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((obj) =>
                                                      {
                                                          try
                                                          {
                                                              ThreadProc(obj);
                                                          }
                                                          catch (Exception ex)
                                                          {
                                                              Console.Error.WriteLine("Task {0} failed: {1}", obj, ex.Message);
                                                          }
                                                          finally
                                                          {
                                                              // Exceptions are possible here too, 
                                                              // but proper error handling is not the goal of this sample
                                                              blockingCounter.WaitableDecrement();
                                                          }
                                                      }, i))
                {
                    blockingCounter.WaitableDecrement();
                    Console.Error.WriteLine("Failed to submit task {0} for execution.", i);
                }
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Waiting for copmletion...");
            blockingCounter.CloseAndWait(30000);
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Work done!");
        Console.ReadKey();

    }

    static void ThreadProc (object obj)
    {
        int taskNumber = (int) obj;
        int numThreads = Interlocked.Increment(ref s_numCurrentThreads);

        Console.WriteLine("Task {0} started. Total: {1}", taskNumber, numThreads);
        int sleepTime = s_rnd.Next(0, 5);
        Thread.Sleep(sleepTime * 1000);
        Console.WriteLine("Task {0} finished.", taskNumber);

        Interlocked.Decrement(ref s_numCurrentThreads);
    }

It uses the BlockingCounter class that is based on the Marc Gravell's SizeQueue posted here, but without a counter instead of a queue. When you end queueing new threads call Close() method and then wait for it to finish.

public class BlockingCounter : IDisposable
{
    private int m_Count;
    private object m_counterLock = new object();

    private bool m_isClosed = false;
    private volatile bool m_isDisposed = false;

    private int m_MaxSize = 0;

    private ManualResetEvent m_Finished = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    public BlockingCounter(int maxSize = 0)
    {
        if (maxSize < 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("maxSize");
        m_MaxSize = maxSize;
    }


    public void WaitableIncrement(int timeoutMs = Timeout.Infinite)
    {
        lock (m_counterLock)
        {
            while (m_MaxSize > 0 && m_Count >= m_MaxSize)
            {
                CheckClosedOrDisposed();
                if (!Monitor.Wait(m_counterLock, timeoutMs))
                    throw new TimeoutException("Failed to wait for counter to decrement.");
            }

            CheckClosedOrDisposed();
            m_Count++;

            if (m_Count == 1)
            {
                Monitor.PulseAll(m_counterLock);
            }

        }
    }

    public void WaitableDecrement(int timeoutMs = Timeout.Infinite)
    {
        lock (m_counterLock)
        {
            try
            {
                while (m_Count == 0)
                {
                    CheckClosedOrDisposed();
                    if (!Monitor.Wait(m_counterLock, timeoutMs))
                        throw new TimeoutException("Failed to wait for counter to increment.");
                }

                CheckDisposed();

                m_Count--;

                if (m_MaxSize == 0 || m_Count == m_MaxSize - 1)
                    Monitor.PulseAll(m_counterLock);
            }
            finally
            {
                if (m_isClosed && m_Count == 0)
                    m_Finished.Set();
            }
        }
    }

    void CheckClosedOrDisposed()
    {
        if (m_isClosed)
            throw new Exception("The counter is closed");
        CheckDisposed();
    }

    void CheckDisposed()
    {
        if (m_isDisposed)
            throw new ObjectDisposedException("The counter has been disposed.");
    }

    public void Close()
    {
        lock (m_counterLock)
        {
            CheckDisposed();
            m_isClosed = true;
            Monitor.PulseAll(m_counterLock);
        }
    }

    public bool WaitForFinish(int timeoutMs = Timeout.Infinite)
    {
        CheckDisposed();
        lock (m_counterLock)
        { 
             if (m_Count == 0)
                 return true;
        }
        return m_Finished.WaitOne(timeoutMs);
    }

    public void CloseAndWait (int timeoutMs = Timeout.Infinite)
    {
        Close();
        WaitForFinish(timeoutMs);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (!m_isDisposed)
        {
            m_isDisposed = true;
            lock (m_counterLock)
            {
                // Wake up all waiting threads, so that they know the object 
                // is disposed and there's nothing to wait anymore
                Monitor.PulseAll(m_counterLock);
            }
            m_Finished.Close();
        }
    }
}

The result will be like that:

Submitting task 1
Submitting task 2
Submitting task 3
Submitting task 4
Submitting task 5
Task 1 started. Total: 1
Task 1 finished.
Task 3 started. Total: 1
Submitting task 6
Task 2 started. Total: 2
Task 3 finished.
Task 6 started. Total: 4
Task 5 started. Total: 3
Task 4 started. Total: 4
Submitting task 7
Task 4 finished.
Submitting task 8
Task 7 started. Total: 4
Task 5 finished.
Submitting task 9
Task 7 finished.
Task 8 started. Total: 4
Task 9 started. Total: 4
Submitting task 10
Task 2 finished.
Waiting for copmletion...
Task 10 started. Total: 4
Task 10 finished.
Task 6 finished.
Task 8 finished.
Task 9 finished.
Work done!
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