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I have a dictionary 'vcomments' where the keys are non-sequential integers. When looping through the keys I need to do so in sorted, or reverse-sorted, order. Currently I use

for key_pt in sorted(self.view.vcomments.iterkeys()):

but I also need to find those keys (or the next key) that are beyond, or before, a certain number:

    if direction == 'down':
        sorted_pts = (key_pt for key_pt in sorted(self.view.vcomments.iterkeys()) if key_pt > curr_pt)
    else:
        sorted_pts = (key_pt for key_pt in reversed(sorted(self.view.vcomments.iterkeys())) if key_pt < curr_pt)
    try:
        next_pt = sorted_pts.next()
    except StopIteration:
  1. Is it possible for me to create an iterator class (using the iterator protocol) that will store the dictionary and enable me to loop through them in either forward, or reverse, order? I'm assuming/guessing that I might need to first assign an attribute-value that will indicate whether the next loop should be forward/reverse.

  2. Can I include a generator-function (nested) within my iterator class that will enable me to retrieve the next key; that is, beyond or before a supplied integer-number?

  3. Similarly, will there be a way for me to supply begin-and-end points and retrieve all keys that fall between these values (in sorted order)?

I apologise for asking three (although related) questions - an answer to the first would give me a start. And I'm not rude enough to expect a full solution, just an indication whether these are feasible targets for me.

Added: and I would still need to be able to retrieve a single, specific dictionary-item by its key.

share|improve this question
    
OK, so you need to retrieve keys on a regular basis. Will you be adding keys frequently? –  senderle Apr 26 '12 at 22:10
    
A dictionary has no order so you won't be able to iterate until you've converted the keys to a sorted list. –  Mark Ransom Apr 26 '12 at 22:12
    
Python does not have a sorted dictionary, but you can mimic one as long as you don't need to add any new items to it. Start with a normal dictionary and then create a sorted dictionary like this: sorted_d = collections.OrderedDict(sorted(d.iteritems())). Updating or adding items will invalidate sorted_d. –  Steven Rumbalski Apr 26 '12 at 22:20
2  
An iterator can't help you if you need the whole 'picture' of a collection. Since you care so much about ordering, maybe a list or an OrderedDict is more appropriate? –  rantanplan Apr 26 '12 at 22:27
2  
@senderle: docs: "An OrderedDict is a dict that remembers the order that keys were first inserted. If a new entry overwrites an existing entry, the original insertion position is left unchanged." So I was incorrect, updating does not change the order. –  Steven Rumbalski Apr 26 '12 at 22:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think the best data structure for your needs here is a skip list. I've never implemented one -- always wanted to -- but it looks to me like this has all of the things you need.

  1. A skip list stores its items in sorted order. Making the base list a doubly linked list will allow forward and reverse iteration in O(n).

  2. A skip list allows O(log n) insertions, modifications, deletions, and searches. That's not quite so fast as a dictionary, but it seems to me that if you need the items stored in sorted order, a dictionary is going to give you trouble -- even an OrderedDict, unless you are very rarely adding keys.

  3. With some modifications described in the wikipedia article above, even indexed access can be implemented in O(log n).

There's one implementation in Python here -- there are probably others.

However, some of your comments suggest that you may be content with simply iterating over a sorted copy of your dictionary, and you're just trying to clean up the above code. So here is one way to go about it. This is pretty naive, but it's a starting point. This assumes you're totally fine with O(n) search times and O(n log n) iteration times, which are both suboptimal...

>>> class SortIterDict(dict):
...     def __iter__(self):
...         return iter(sorted(super(SortIterDict, self).__iter__()))
...     def __reversed__(self):
...         return reversed(tuple(iter(self)))
...     def get_next(self, n):
...         return next((x for x in iter(self) if x > n), None)
...     def get_prev(self, n):
...         return next((x for x in reversed(self) if x < n), None)
... 
>>> d = SortIterDict({'d':6, 'a':5, 'c':2})
>>> list(d)
['a', 'c', 'd']
>>> list(reversed(d))
['d', 'c', 'a']
>>> d.get_next('b')
'c'
>>> d.get_prev('b')
'a'
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice, these complexities look very similar to what blist.sorteddict promises, although the data structure is completely different. Iteration should be a bit cheaper with the skip list, while searching and random access is slower. –  Niklas B. Apr 26 '12 at 23:04
    
@NiklasB., for what it's worth, I upvoted your answer and would encourage you to undelete it; not everyone coming to this question will be looking for the simple approach, and even there, I appreciate the alternative to creating a class that you present. I'm not totally sure about what I've written here! –  senderle Apr 27 '12 at 1:04
1  
Fair enough :-) –  Niklas B. Apr 27 '12 at 1:13

First of all, you should note that you need a better data structure. Python dicts have no order at all and an OrderedDict just keeps the insertion order (so you need to re-sort on every key change). A sorted dictionary like blist.sorteddict or even a sorted list like blist.sortedlist probably suits your needs a lot better.

Is it possible for me to create an iterator class (using the iterator protocol) that will store the dictionary and enable me to loop through them in either forward, or reverse, order? I'm assuming/guessing that I might need to first assign an attribute-value that will indicate whether the next loop should be forward/reverse.

You don't need a separate iterator class here. You get forward iteration for free and backward iteration via the built-in reversed function:

for key in mydict:
  # do something

for key in reversed(mydict.keys()):
  # do something

Can I include a generator-function (nested) within my iterator class that will enable me to retrieve the next key; that is, beyond or before a supplied integer-number?

Sure, itertools has lots of functionality that enables you do do something like that:

from itertools import dropwhile, takewhile
# find next key beyond 4
next(dropwhile(lambda x: x <= 4, mydict))
# find last key before 20
next(dropwhile(lambda x: x >= 20, reversed(mydict.keys()))

You can also package that into a function:

def first_beyond(pivot, seq):
  next(dropwhile(lambda x: x <= pivot, seq))

first_beyond(4, mydict)
first_beyond(20, reversed(mydict.keys()))

Similarly, will there be a way for me to supply begin-and-end points and retrieve all keys that fall between these values (in sorted order)?

You can easily built a general tool for that:

from itertools import dropwhile, takewhile
def between(begin, end, seq):
  return takewhile(lambda x: x <= end, 
                   dropwhile(lambda x: x < begin, seq))

To be used like this:

>>> list(between(4, 30, [1,2,4,8,16,32]))
[4, 8, 16]

EDIT: If you just need to examine the sorted keys on occasion, you can just convert them to a sorted list and work with them. The idioms stay the same as above:

keys = sorted(mydict)

# forward and backward iteration
for k in keys:
  # ...
for k in reversed(keys):
  # ...

# function that returns a forward or backward iterator based on an argument
def forward_or_backward(seq, forward=True):
  for x in (iter if forward else reversed)(seq):
    yield x

# random access inside a loop
for i, key in enumerate(keys):
  # next element
  key[i+1]

# the between and first_beyond functions above also work for lists

The rest of your functionality can be glued together from these pieces. Note that creating a special class is not sensible, as we can write the functions in a way general enough that they work on any iterable, not just your lists of keys.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that a "sorteddict" is based on a B+Tree, which is a balanced tree datastructure related to treaps and red-black trees. There are several others, depending on your needs, like skiplists, splay trees, AA trees, etc. skiplists in particular would seem to be simple to make go forward and back. –  user1277476 Apr 26 '12 at 22:55
    
@user: Yep. One could even built something like that in pure Python using a dict and a separate deque to remember the order. –  Niklas B. Apr 26 '12 at 22:59
    
@Andrew: Please stop commenting on the other answer, the author will get notified about every comment. Also, please note that you can "ping" people by prefixing their name with a @ symbol. Now please check my update, I've added some code that might be useful for working with your type of lists. Note that creating a separate class is not necessary, all the required functionality is already available in itertool or can be implemented in a way general enough to work with any iterable (not just your lists), so it should be provided as functions, not as methods of a specific class. –  Niklas B. Apr 26 '12 at 23:30
    
@NiklasB. This is my first post and I cannot see how to respond without clicking 'Add Comment'. I shall study your code and suggestions in more detail, thank you. –  Andy G Apr 26 '12 at 23:51

At times like this, I tend to store part of my data in two different ways.

What if you kept around your dict, but added a list indexed by int's that brings up the keys (r values?) of your dict? This would give you the random access you probably require (I assume you have the dict for a reason), as well as the backward-and-forward behavior you seem to need to add.

If you go this route, you might wrap it all up in a class, so you don't have double-updates scattered throughout your code.

It would likely be feasible to take a treap or red-black tree implementation, and modify it to let you specify a key, and get back the key, value pair at the next or previous key. If you're frequently inserting or deleting values, one of these might be better.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of maintaining a separate list of the keys. However, I think it is unnecessary for my current requirements, as it is only on occasion that I need to retrieve them in sorted order, and the code I initially presented is fine for my purpose. I was just interested in moving my iterators/generators into a separate class. –  Andy G Apr 26 '12 at 23:31

It seems an ordereddict will likely give you what you want. The documentation is here.

share|improve this answer
    
How is that? You need to sort those manually as well. –  Niklas B. Apr 26 '12 at 22:33
1  
As shown in the examples there, ordered dict can be used along with sort functions to sort in any way you wish and then maintain the new order. The sorteddict options you mention seem like they might be better in some ways, but OrderedDict is part of collections and will be available on most Python distros where the sorteddict options require adding new libraries. –  TimothyAWiseman Apr 26 '12 at 22:45
    
Thank you for all these rapid responses. Perhaps a little more detail would help. I'm storing comment-points added within an editor. The comments are added often, and anywhere within the editor. –  Andy G Apr 26 '12 at 22:54
    
@Timothy: There exist pure-Python implementations as well that don't have any special dependencies. Implementing this using inappropriate data structures is just reinventing the wheel, IMHO. But of course this is a matter of opinion –  Niklas B. Apr 26 '12 at 22:58
    
Thank you for all these rapid responses. Perhaps a little more detail would help. I'm storing comment-points added within an editor. The comments are added often, and anywhere within the editor. I don't really need to convert my dictionary to a list, or to store them in a sorted-dictionary, as I am able to examine them in sorted order whenever they are altered (moved, deleted, etc.) using code as shown in my original post. It all works as I want, but I was considering creating a separate class to store the dictionary - to make my code "neater" and avoid repeating sections of code. –  Andy G Apr 26 '12 at 23:03

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