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I'm trying to remove some confusion with pointer to structures which are used as members in class. I wrote following code, but even though the program compiles it crashes. Could you please say what I'm doing wrong in the following code?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

struct a{
    int s;
    int b;
    char*h;
};

class test
{
public:
    a * f;
    void dh();
    void dt();
};

void test::dh()
{
    a d;
    d.s=1;
    d.b=2;
    d.h="ffdf";
    f=&d;
}

void test::dt()
{
    printf("%s %d %d",f->h,f->b,f->s);
}

int main()
{
    test g;
    g.dh();
    g.dt();
    return 0;
}
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1  
google the rule of 3. Then use smart pointers instead. –  Mooing Duck Apr 28 '12 at 7:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
void test::dh()
{
    a d; <--
    d.s=1;
    d.b=2;
    d.h="ffdf";
    f=&d; <--
}

You're creating a local object, d, and then setting f to the address of this object. Once the function ends, the object goes out of scope and you're left with a dangling pointer.

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Your biggest problem is that by the time dh() returns, d is no longer in scope. Instead of a d; in dh(), you need f = new a(); f.s=1; f.b=2, f.h="ffdf";.

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Can their be any possibility of memory issue because of declaring f=new a() ? –  the_naive Apr 26 '12 at 22:37
2  
@the_naive As long as you have a corresponding delete, you're good. Consider using a smart pointer if you're worried about it, or even if you aren't. They will free the memory for you. –  chris Apr 26 '12 at 22:39
2  
@the_naive, technically yes. To be correct, your code should expect that allocating f could possibly fail. In practice in a program this small with a data structure this small, it won't come up. You should probably be in the habit of always checking, but if there's no clear way to recover, sometimes it's best to just crash and get it over with. –  sblom Apr 26 '12 at 22:39
    
Thanks a lot. Learned a lot from you :D. –  the_naive Apr 26 '12 at 22:41

In test::dh, you assign public pointer f the address of d, which is a local variable. When g.dh(); exits, the address of d is no longer valid, which is why the references to f in g.dt(); fail.

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