Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a test program which consists of just an infinite loop with some computations inside, and performs no I/O operations. I tried starting two instances of the program, one with a high niceness value, and the other with a low niceness value:

sudo nice -n 19 taskset 1 ./test
sudo nice -n -20 taskset 1 ./test

The taskset command ensures that both programs execute on the same core. Contrary to my expectation, top reports that both programs get about 50% of the computation time. Why is that? Does the nice command even have an effect?

share|improve this question
    
what were the computations? Perhaps there's not enough contention on the processor to make a difference –  laher Apr 26 '12 at 22:59
    
The computations inside the loop are fairly long. I also checked the generated assembler output and nothing is optimized away (compiled with lowest optimization settings on gcc). –  Hermann Speiche Apr 26 '12 at 23:10
    
possible duplicate of Understanding renice –  ninjalj Jul 5 '14 at 10:13

3 Answers 3

I'm assuming that there's a & missing at the end of the command line. Otherwise, the second line won't run until the first completes.

While both processes are running, use something like top and make sure that they each have the nice value that you assigned.

What happens if you launch the processes using only taskset and then adjust their priority with renice after they are running?

share|improve this answer
    
The problem was that I was running the instances in two console windows in foreground. When I run them in background (using &) it works. It seems that Linux privileges processes running in foreground in a console and largely (completely?) ignores their niceness values. This makes sense as a user likely wants to interact with the program he/she started in a console window. –  Hermann Speiche Apr 26 '12 at 23:27
    
Any clarification on how this works exactly would be greatly appreciated. –  Hermann Speiche Apr 26 '12 at 23:34
    
Running a program in the foreground runs it as a child process of the console that spawned it, and child processes typically inherit the priority of their parent. Adding the & runs the program as a completely separate process, allowing you to control its priority individually. –  bta Apr 26 '12 at 23:42
    
Yes, but starting a program with nice (without &) does still change the priority of the child process. –  Hermann Speiche Apr 27 '12 at 0:01
    
It's possible that the system is limiting how far you can increase the priority of a foreground process attached to a console. After all if you increase the priority high enough that the parent console can't get any CPU time, then you can't even Ctrl+C to kill a runaway child process. I forget exactly how the kernel does this, but I do remember there being a mechanism for the kernel enforcing max/min priority limits. –  bta Apr 27 '12 at 18:31

I put together a test.c that just does:

for(;;)
   {
   }

And then ran it with your nice's. I didn't run a different sudo for each one, but rather sudo'd an interactive shell and ran them both from there. I used two &'s.

I got one ./test hitting my CPU hard, and one barely touching it.

Naturally, the system still felt quite responsive; it takes a lot of CPU-hogging processes on modern processors to get so much load you can "feel" it.

That stands in contrast to I/O-hogging processes and memory-hogging processes; in these cases a single greedy process can make a system painful to use.

I'd guess either your system has a relatively unique priority-related bug (or subtlety), or there's something up with your methodology.

I ran my test on an Ubuntu 11.04 system.

share|improve this answer
    
When I ran both processes in background it also worked. I suppose Linux privileges processes with which the user may want to interact (e.g. programs started from bash and running in foreground), and largely ignores their niceness values. –  Hermann Speiche Apr 26 '12 at 23:58

Process niceness (priority) setting HAS an effect on Linux! (in practise, but ONLY if you give it enough work to do!)

On my system, as long as all cores are fully loaded, then nice does have an impact. On ubuntu 14.04, processes run with nice -N gets through 0.807 ** N operations compared to processes run without altering the nice value (given you are running one instance per core for each nice level).

In my case I have quad core i7 with hyper threading turned off, so if I run four or less processes, then it doesn't matter what their nice values are - they each get a full core. If I run four processes at nice level 0 and 4 at nice level 12, then the ones at level 12 get through 0.807 ^ 12, ie approx 7% of the work the ones at nice level zero do. The ratio seems to be a reasonable predictor from nice levels 0 through 14, after that it fluctuates (A few runs had nice level 18 processing more than nice 16 for instance) - Running the test for longer may smooth the results out.

(ruby 2.1.2 used)

,cl file:

uptime
nices='-0 -6 -12 -18'
nices='-0 -18'
nices='-0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -10 -12 -14 -16 -18'
rm -f ,n-*
for i in 1 2 3 4
do
  for n in $nices
  do
    nice $n ruby ,count_loops.rb > ,n${n}-$i &
  done
done
ps -l
uptime
wait
uptime
ps -l
c=`cat ,n-0-[1234] | total`
last=$c
for n in $nices
do
  echo
  c2=`cat ,n${n}-[1234] | total`
  echo total of `cat ,n${n}-[1234]` is $c2
  echo -n "nice $n count $2, percentage: "
  echo "3 k $c2 100 * $c / p" | dc
  echo -n "                  percent of last: "
  echo "3 k $c2 100 * $last / p" | dc
  last=$c2
done
uptime
echo total count: `cat ,n-*-[1234] | total`

,count_loops.rb file

#!/usr/bin/env  ruby
limit = Time.new + 70
i=0
while Time.new < limit
 i += 1
 j = 0
 while (j += 1) < 10000
   t = j
 end
end
puts i

results of sh ,cl - initial diagnostic output:

 19:16:25 up 20:55,  2 users,  load average: 3.58, 3.59, 2.88
F S   UID   PID  PPID  C PRI  NI ADDR SZ WCHAN  TTY          TIME CMD
0 S  1000  4987  4977  0  80   0 -  7297 wait   pts/3    00:00:00 bash
0 S  1000 11743  2936  0  80   0 -  2515 wait   pts/3    00:00:00 rubymine.sh
0 S  1000 11808 11743  6  80   0 - 834604 futex_ pts/3   00:18:10 java
0 S  1000 11846 11808  0  80   0 -  4061 poll_s pts/3    00:00:02 fsnotifier64
0 S  1000 19613  4987  0  80   0 -  2515 wait   pts/3    00:00:00 sh
0 R  1000 19616 19613  0  80   0 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19617 19613  0  82   2 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19618 19613  0  84   4 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19619 19613  0  86   6 -  7416 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19620 19613  0  88   8 -  6795 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19621 19613  0  90  10 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19622 19613  0  92  12 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19623 19613  0  94  14 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19624 19613  0  96  16 -  6078 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19625 19613  0  98  18 -  6012 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19626 19613  0  80   0 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19627 19613  0  82   2 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19628 19613  0  84   4 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19629 19613  0  86   6 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19630 19613  0  88   8 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19631 19613  0  90  10 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19632 19613  0  92  12 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19633 19613  0  94  14 -  6144 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19634 19613  0  96  16 -  4971 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19635 19613  0  98  18 -  4971 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19636 19613  0  80   0 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19637 19613  0  82   2 -  7449 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19638 19613  0  84   4 -  7344 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19639 19613  0  86   6 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19640 19613  0  88   8 -  7416 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19641 19613  0  90  10 -  6210 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19642 19613  0  92  12 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19643 19613  0  94  14 -  5976 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19644 19613  0  96  16 -  6111 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19645 19613  0  98  18 -  4971 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19646 19613  0  80   0 -  7582 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19647 19613  0  82   2 -  7516 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19648 19613  0  84   4 -  7416 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19649 19613  0  86   6 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19650 19613  0  88   8 -  6177 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19651 19613  0  90  10 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19652 19613  0  92  12 -  6078 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19653 19613  0  94  14 -  6247 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19654 19613  0  96  16 -  4971 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19655 19613  0  98  18 -  4971 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ruby
0 R  1000 19656 19613  0  80   0 -  3908 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ps
 19:16:26 up 20:55,  2 users,  load average: 3.58, 3.59, 2.88
 19:17:37 up 20:56,  3 users,  load average: 28.92, 11.25, 5.59
F S   UID   PID  PPID  C PRI  NI ADDR SZ WCHAN  TTY          TIME CMD
0 S  1000  4987  4977  0  80   0 -  7297 wait   pts/3    00:00:00 bash
0 S  1000 11743  2936  0  80   0 -  2515 wait   pts/3    00:00:00 rubymine.sh
0 S  1000 11808 11743  6  80   0 - 834604 futex_ pts/3   00:18:10 java
0 S  1000 11846 11808  0  80   0 -  4061 poll_s pts/3    00:00:02 fsnotifier64
0 S  1000 19613  4987  0  80   0 -  2515 wait   pts/3    00:00:00 sh
0 R  1000 19794 19613  0  80   0 -  3908 -      pts/3    00:00:00 ps

results of sh ,cl - statistics: (percentage of last is the percentage of this total compares to the count for the last group of processes)

total of 99951 101725 100681 104046 is 406403
nice -0 count , percentage: 100.000
                  percent of last: 100.000

total of 64554 62971 64006 63462 is 254993
nice -2 count , percentage: 62.743
                  percent of last: 62.743

total of 42997 43041 43197 42717 is 171952
nice -4 count , percentage: 42.310
                  percent of last: 67.434

total of 26882 28250 27151 27244 is 109527
nice -6 count , percentage: 26.950
                  percent of last: 63.696

total of 17228 17189 17427 17769 is 69613
nice -8 count , percentage: 17.129
                  percent of last: 63.557

total of 10815 10792 11021 11307 is 43935
nice -10 count , percentage: 10.810
                  percent of last: 63.113

total of 7023 6923 7885 7323 is 29154
nice -12 count , percentage: 7.173
                  percent of last: 66.357

total of 5005 4881 4938 5159 is 19983
nice -14 count , percentage: 4.917
                  percent of last: 68.542

total of 3517 5537 3555 4092 is 16701
nice -16 count , percentage: 4.109
                  percent of last: 83.576

total of 4372 4307 5552 4527 is 18758
nice -18 count , percentage: 4.615
                  percent of last: 112.316
 19:17:37 up 20:56,  3 users,  load average: 28.92, 11.25, 5.59
total count: 1141019

( Purists will note I am mixing ruby, shell and dc - they will have to forgive me for old habits from last century showing through ;) )

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.