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I have the following set of code:

using (OracleConnection conn = new OracleConnection(m_fceConn))
{
    conn.Open();

    using (OracleCommand cmd = new OracleCommand(m_sql, conn))
    {
        using (OracleDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
        {
            reader.Read();
        }
    }

    conn.Close();
}

Is there a better way to format this? Granted, later on I will probably be breaking out opening a connection, running a query, and closing the connection into separate functions at a later date but this nesting will still be there "behind the scenes" so to speak.

I read on another thread that I could format things like so:

using (OracleConnection conn = new OracleConnection(m_fceConn))
using (OracleCommand cmd = new OracleCommand(m_sql, conn))

But considering that I have code in between each of these statements I don't believe that I can omit the brackets like that. I'm just looking for the best/safest practice here since I'm still realtively new/noob to C#. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
You don't need to close the connection since dispose(the using) implicitely calls close. –  Tim Schmelter Apr 26 '12 at 22:54
    
@Tim Schmelter: Thanks for that tidbit. I was pretty sure that it did but I figured I'd rather be safe then sorry. Though, I do also kind of like the explicitness of writing it out as it doesn't get any clearer than: Open-> Read <-Close. Is there any possible problems that can arise from leaving it? –  Kittoes Apr 26 '12 at 23:00
    
@Kittoes - No, no problems. You can also do cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection) and it will close the connection as well. –  Erik Funkenbusch Apr 26 '12 at 23:09
    
@Mystere Man: I'm curious, what would be the advantage in doing so? Or is it -just- another option to close the connection? –  Kittoes Apr 26 '12 at 23:12
    
@Kittoes - just another way. Might have advantages in some situations, but i can't think of what they might be. –  Erik Funkenbusch Apr 26 '12 at 23:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I could be wrong, but I don't think you need to open the connection before passing it to OracleCommand. You just have to open it prior to executing a command. So you could write the above as:

using (OracleConnection conn = new OracleConnection(m_fceConn)) 
using (OracleCommand cmd = new OracleCommand(m_sql, conn))
{ 
    conn.Open(); 
    using (OracleDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader()) 
    { 
        reader.Read(); 
    } 
}

(you also shouldn't need to explicitly close either since disposing of the connection should close it automatically).

There's nothing special about the above code (other than it looks nice), it's just using normal C# rules that apply single commands to such blocks. it's the same as this:

if (...)
if (...)
   dosomething(); // Look Ma, no curly braces

it's just that you're "stacking" multiple single statements.

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What you have is properly formatted, though it's not necessary to call conn.Close() since the connection will be disposed (and thus closed) at the end of the using block that declared it.

You can, however, omit the brackets for the second statement, since the entirety of that statement is just another using block.

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Your first using statement needs to have brackets, since you have the conn.Open() call there. The second and third can be stacked as you stated, which is pretty idiomatic C# (and preferred, in my case).

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using (OracleConnection conn = new OracleConnection(m_fceConn))
{
    conn.Open();

    using (OracleDataReader reader = new OracleCommand(m_sql, conn).ExecuteReader())
    {
        reader.Read();
    }

    conn.Close();
}

EDIT On second thought, don't do this. It wouldn't dispose of the command object. I will leave the answer here as an example of what NOT to do.

share|improve this answer
1  
This does not dispose the command, unless some other trickery in the Oracle library does that. –  Adam Robinson Apr 26 '12 at 22:52
    
ahh, good catch. is there a way to redact? –  therealmitchconnors Apr 26 '12 at 22:53
    
You can always edit your answer or delete if it's no longer relevant. –  Adam Robinson Apr 26 '12 at 22:54

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