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I wrote a C# server application. The server utilizes Asynchronous TCP sockets.

The packets are 80-180 bytes of data.

For performance testing I have a single client connect and send packets continuously. With debugging on the first 100 packets (0-100) receive in roughly 5 seconds. By the time the server received packets #300-400 it takes roughly 30 seconds to receive the packets. The performance continues to degrade as more receives occur.

I looked around and have not been able to find a solution. I have tried setting the Socket.NoDelay flag in case the Nagle algorithm was inhibiting the server.

I have disabled all functions within the server; so that it is only receiving to ensure I wasn't losing performance in other code.

I have also checked my CPU utilization and it is ~13%. I have over 2 GB of free memory. When running the application the ram is NOT constantly growing and utilization is minimal.

I am at a loss as to what to debug and look into next...

EDIT: Added Code Sample

public void StartListening()
    {

        try
        {
            IPAddress ipAddress = IPAddress.Parse("192.168.2.60");
            IPEndPoint localEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(ipAddress, m_Port);
            m_MainSocket = new Socket(localEndPoint.Address.AddressFamily, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
            m_MainSocket.NoDelay = true;
            m_MainSocket.Bind(localEndPoint);
            m_MainSocket.Listen(10);
            m_MainSocket.BeginAccept(new AsyncCallback(clientConnected), null);

            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Listening on:Local IP Address: " + localEndPoint.Address.ToString() + " Port :" + localEndPoint.Port.ToString() + "\n");
        }
        catch (SocketException se)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Listening Exception \n");
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(se.Message);
        }
    }

    void clientConnected(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        try
        {
            SocketState state = new SocketState(m_MainSocket.EndAccept(ar));
            Client client = new Client(state);

            if (client.SocketState.clientSocket.Connected)
            {
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Client #?????? Connected \n");
                AddLogText("Client #?????? Connected \r\n\r\n");
                waitForData(client);
                SetSendButton(true);
            }

            m_MainSocket.BeginAccept(new AsyncCallback(clientConnected), null);
        }
        catch (ObjectDisposedException)
        {
           System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Client Connected: Socket has been closed\n");
        }
        catch (SocketException se)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Client Connected Exception \n");
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(se.Message);
        }
    }

    void waitForData(Client client)
    {
        try
        {
            SocketState state = new SocketState(client.SocketState.clientSocket);
            client.SocketState.clientSocket = null; 
            client.SocketState = state;
            client.SocketState.clientSocket.BeginReceive(client.SocketState.DataBuffer, 0, client.SocketState.DataBuffer.Length, SocketFlags.None, new AsyncCallback(readDataCallback), client);
        }
        catch (SocketException se)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Wait For Data Exception \n");
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(se.Message);
        }

    }

    public void readDataCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        Client client = (Client)ar.AsyncState;
        try
        {                
            // Read data from the client socket.
            int iRx = client.SocketState.clientSocket.EndReceive(ar);
            client.SocketState.SB.Append(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(client.SocketState.DataBuffer, 0, iRx));
            string sPacketString = client.SocketState.SB.ToString();

            Server formServer = this;
            Packet_Helper packet_helper = new Packet_Helper(sPacketString, formServer);

            Packet packet = new Packet(sPacketString);
            client.SerialNumber = packet.SerialNumber;
            client.FirmwareVersion = packet.FirmwareVersion;
            client.ProductID = packet.ProductID;
            client.HardwareVersion = packet.HardwareVersion;
            if (!m_Clients.ContainsKey(packet.SerialNumber))
            {
                m_Clients.Add(packet.SerialNumber, client);
                UpdateClientList();
                string[] packets = client.refreshAll();
                for (int i = 0; i < packets.Length; i++)
                {
                    byte[] byteData = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(packets[i]);
                    client.SocketState.clientSocket.BeginSend(byteData, 0, byteData.Length, SocketFlags.None, new AsyncCallback(SendCallback), client);
                    AddPacketsSentText(packets[i] + "--" + (iSent++).ToString() + "\r\n\r\n");
                }
            }

            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Read " + sPacketString.Length.ToString() + " bytes from " + client.SerialNumber + "\n" + sPacketString + "\n");
            AddLogText("Read " + sPacketString.Length.ToString() + " bytes from " + client.SerialNumber + " \r\n");
            AddLogText(sPacketString.ToString() + "\r\n\r\n");

            waitForData(client);
        }
        catch (ObjectDisposedException)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Log(0, "1", "\nOnDataReceived: Socket has been closed\n");
        }
        catch (SocketException se)
        {
            if (se.ErrorCode == 10054) // Error code for Connection reset by peer
            {
                string sclientSerial = "??????";
                if (client.SerialNumber != null || client.SerialNumber != "")
                    sclientSerial = client.SerialNumber;
                AddLogText("Client " + sclientSerial + " Disconnected" + "\r\n\r\n");
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Client " + sclientSerial + " Disconnected" + "\n");

                m_Clients.Remove(sclientSerial);
                UpdateClientList();
            }
            else
            {
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Read Data Exception \n");
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(se.Message);
            }
        }
    }


class SocketState
{
    private Socket m_ClientSocket;                   //Socket connection to the client
    private byte[] m_DataBuffer = new byte[256];        //Buffer to store the data sent by the client
    private StringBuilder m_SB = new StringBuilder();  //for building recieved data into a string 

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or Sets the client Socket
    /// </summary>
    public Socket clientSocket
    {
        get { return m_ClientSocket; }
        set { m_ClientSocket = value; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the DataBuffer
    /// </summary>
    public byte[] DataBuffer
    {
        get { return m_DataBuffer; }
        set { DataBuffer = value; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or Sets the SB
    /// </summary>
    public StringBuilder SB
    {
        get { return m_SB; }
        set { m_SB = value; }
    }

    public SocketState(Socket socket)
    {
        m_ClientSocket = socket;
        m_ClientSocket.ReceiveBufferSize = 256;
        m_ClientSocket.NoDelay = true;
        //m_DataBuffer = Enumerable.Repeat((byte)0, 256).ToArray();
    }
}      

Edit: AddLogText() function added. This function is used to add text to a Text Box that is in the UI.

//Delegate - enables asychronous calls for setting the text property of the tb_ListeningLog

delegate void AddLogTextCallback(string text);

private void AddLogText(string text)
    {
        // InvokeRequired required compares the thread ID of the
        // calling thread to the thread ID of the creating thread.
        // If these threads are different, it returns true.
        if (this.tb_ListeningLog.InvokeRequired)
        {
            AddLogTextCallback d = new AddLogTextCallback(AddLogText);
            this.Invoke(d, new object[] { text });
        }
        else
        {
            this.tb_ListeningLog.Text += text;
            tb_ListeningLog.SelectionStart = tb_ListeningLog.Text.Length;
            tb_ListeningLog.ScrollToCaret();
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
While this doesn't address your question, do you have a particular reason for doing socket-level programming rather than using something like NetTcpBinding with WCF? –  Adam Robinson Apr 26 '12 at 22:57
    
closing the sockets? Also, you've checked CPU utilization, perhaps via task manager? run the server with the vs profiler too! –  payo Apr 26 '12 at 22:58
    
Garbage collection perhaps? Despite free memory being available, collection does still occur I believe –  Venatu Apr 26 '12 at 22:58
2  
100 packets of 180 bytes in 5 seconds is 3.5 KB/s at 13% CPU, you must be doing something very wrong. –  Jeff Cyr Apr 26 '12 at 23:01
2  
Random question - how many cores on the machine that you're running on? I used to be able to tell when I had an infinite loop by watching the processor utilization go to 100%, but on an 8-core machine and a single thread, only one core is pinned, for a utilization of ~12.5%. –  dsolimano Apr 27 '12 at 1:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm taking a bit of a shot in the dark with this answer, but the code you've posted certainly helps.

The reason you're probably seeing slow performance as time goes on is because of the code in your readDataCallback method. The way you have it set up, the processing of the data is done before you go for another receive. This means that as the length of the processing increases, the duration between receiving your data increases.

I don't know what code is in a lot of your methods, but you should generally look at any loops that may be taking a while to finish. If you're having trouble finding the bottleneck by looking through your code, try finding which methods take the longest to finish and continue to narrow your code down.

For instance (I'm guessing that the bottleneck is in this area of code):

if (!m_Clients.ContainsKey(packet.SerialNumber))
{
    m_Clients.Add(packet.SerialNumber, client);

    AddLogText("Running UpdateClientList\r\n");

    UpdateClientList();

    AddLogText("Doing client.refreshAll\r\n");

    string[] packets = client.refreshAll();

    AddLogText("Doing for loop\r\n");

    for (int i = 0; i < packets.Length; i++)
    {
        byte[] byteData = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(packets[i]);
        client.SocketState.clientSocket.BeginSend(byteData, 0, byteData.Length, SocketFlags.None, new AsyncCallback(SendCallback), client);
        AddPacketsSentText(packets[i] + "--" + (iSent++).ToString() + "\r\n\r\n");
    }
}

Just observe the amount of time between each method with your eyes, or make it easier and use a Stopwatch or DateTime to show exact time.

Also, if you find that the behavior of the code cannot be made more efficient, you could toy around with the idea of processing the data in a separate thread. I'm assuming that this behavior isn't desired, though, because of the question at hand.


For your AddLogText method, try using tb_ListeningLog.Text.AppendText instead of +=.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. The m_Clients is a dictionary that I add Client objects into. The key is the client serial number and the value is the Client object. That code only ever runs the first time a new client connects. Should I be trying to start another receive and process the data separately? –  Mausimo Apr 27 '12 at 15:56
    
A broader way of determining whether or not the bottleneck is in readDataCallback would be to observe how much time it takes to do the method from start to finish. If you don't observe an increase in time, then this isn't the problem. Otherwise, the problem is somewhere in that method. –  Timiz0r Apr 27 '12 at 16:03
    
Trying this as we speak. Thanks :) –  Mausimo Apr 27 '12 at 16:07
    
Alright you win :). Packet #1 took 10 ms to process. Packet #400 took 297ms to process. The processing time slowly grew from 10 ms to 297 ms over 400 packets. Now to figure out why. thanks! –  Mausimo Apr 27 '12 at 16:18
2  
+= uses string concatenation, which is expensive on larger strings; as the amount of text in the textbox increased, the operation became more expensive. AppendText uses a method not involving concatenation, which you can observe through a decompiler. –  Timiz0r Apr 27 '12 at 17:25

I am not sure why you have such a long piece of code to read more data. Also, try placing the message in a Queue which can be processed by a different thread.

Here is an implementation I use:

// Read data from the client
private void ReadCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
{
    StateObject state = (StateObject)ar.AsyncState;
    Socket socket = state.workSocket;

    try
    {
        if (socket.Connected)
        {
            // Read the socket
            int bytesRead = socket.EndReceive(ar);

            // Deserialize objects
            foreach (MessageBase msg in MessageBase.Receive(socket, bytesRead, state))
            {
                // Add objects to the message queue
                lock (this.messageQueue)
                    messageQueue.Enqueue(msg);
            }

            // Notify any event handlers
            if (DataRecieved != null)
                DataRecieved(socket, bytesRead);

            // Asynchronously read more client data
            socket.BeginReceive(state.Buffer, state.readOffset, state.BufferSize - state.readOffset, 0,
                ReadCallback, state);
        }
        else
        {
            HandleClientDisconnect(socket);
        }
    }
    catch (SocketException)
    {
        HandleClientDisconnect(socket);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply NickV. This is my first shot at Sockets. I am definitely looking to improve my code. I can see how using a queue works well. Thanks. –  Mausimo Apr 27 '12 at 17:30
    
When you add items to a queue, are you relying on a timer to read data on a separate thread out of the queue? Or are the event handlers processing data on a separate thread? –  Mausimo Jun 13 '12 at 20:12

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