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Ok,I´ve searched and couldn´t find a suitable solution for my problem, I am redesigning a part of our point of sale system. Let´s suppose we have the following classes:

TWorkShift = class
   Date: TDateTime;
   fTotalSold: Currency;
   fSales: TList<TSale>; 
public
   property TotalSold: Currency read fTotalSold write fTotalSold;
   property Sales: Currency read fSales write fSales;
end;

TSale = class
    fAmount: Currency;
    fWorkShift: TWorkShift;
public
    property Amount: Currency read fAmount write fAmount; 
    procedure Save;  
end;

Now, the problem I am facing is trying to come to the best idea without violating the Law of Demeter. What I am trying to accomplish is the following:

  1. Every time a new TSale is saved I want to add it to the Sales list of the TWorkShift of the current user, and also I want to sum the amount of the sale to the "TotalSold" of the TWorkShift.

I´ve tried two different approaches:

Approach A:

// Let´s suppose we have a working shift with the ID 1 and gets loaded from database with: CurrentShift := TWorkShift.Create(1);

NewSale := TSale.Create;
NewSale.Amount:=100;
NewSale.Save;

CurrentShift.Sales.Add(NewSale);
CurrentShift.TotalSold := CurrentShift.TotalSold + NewSale.Amount;

The problem with this approach is that It´s difficult to test, because I want to encapsulate the logic of the sum in some of the classes or somewhere else (a new class maybe?).

Approach B:

My other approach is including that code inside the TSale class itself:

procedure TSale.Save;
begin
    SaveToDataBase; 

    fWorkShift.Sales.Add(Self);
    fWorkShift.TotalSold := fWorkShift.TotalSold + Self.Amount;
end;

This approach I think violates the Law of Demeter and doesn´t feel right to me.

I Want to find a "right way" to do it maximizing code simplicity and easy of maintenance in the future. So any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to add a sale to TWorkShift, then you should have

TWorkShift.AddSale(aSale: TSale);
begin
  Sales.Add(aSale);
end;

In other words, TWorkShift should "ask" for the thing it needs.

Also, I don't see any reason that TSale would have a TWorkShift field. A Workshift has many sales, but why would a Sale have a WorkShift?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Nick, Well in this case I am using the Aurelius ORM framework so I have an "Association" in order to get information such as: Sale := Manager.Find<TSale>(1); ShowMessage('The sale was sold in the work shift with ID:' + IntToStr(Sale.Shift.ID)); This is neccesary because sometimes I need to show all the information about a sale, like the shift in which it was sold, the date, the cashier, etc. –  Luis Carrasco Apr 27 '12 at 0:12
1  
Luis, that's a problem for the presentation layer not the BL. The presentation layer should assemble all information needed. So in your case you could retrieve the sale object from the workshift object and have all information. –  whosrdaddy Apr 27 '12 at 9:05
    
Luis -- if an ORM is forcing you to do that, then you probably need to consider using a different ORM. That is bad design -- a Sale should know nothing about the Workshift where it happened. What if you want to sell things away from any Workshift at all? –  Nick Hodges Apr 28 '12 at 2:04
    
I should add that whosrdaddy is right: The workshift should produce all of its sales or any particular sale. –  Nick Hodges Apr 28 '12 at 2:08
    
Thanks Nick, whorsdaddy. Actually Im still testing Aurelius ORM, also I´ve been reading your Dependency Injection & Spring Framework articles Nick and I am impressed. Tried to mix it with Aurelius but when I change everything to use interfaces the ORM gets broken. I am trying to achieve maximum easy of maintenance and aiming to produce simple code. I liked your simple code regarding that the WorkShift should only ask for what it needs. –  Luis Carrasco Apr 28 '12 at 5:20

You are doing something when you add items to a TList so you can use the OnNotify. I don't know if Aurelius is also using that event so I added some code for that. You only have to see if assigning the OnNotify can happen inside the framework after the list is assigned to your TWorkShift object because then it might overwrite the NotifySales event handler.

type
  TWorkShift = class
  private
    Date: TDateTime;
    fTotalSold: Currency;
    fSales: TList<TSale>;
    fNotifySales: TCollectionNotifyEvent<TSale>;
    procedure NotifySales(Sender: TObject; const Item: TSale;
      Action: TCollectionNotification);
    procedure SetSales(const Value: TList<TSale>);
  public
    property TotalSold: Currency read fTotalSold write fTotalSold;
    property Sales: TList<TSale> read fSales write SetSales;
  end;

procedure TWorkShift.NotifySales(Sender: TObject; const Item: TSale;
  Action: TCollectionNotification);
begin
  if Assigned(fNotifySales) then
    fNotifySales(Sender, Item, Action);

  case Action of
    cnAdded: fTotalSold := fTotalSold + Item.Amount;
    cnRemoved: fTotalSold := fTotalSold - Item.Amount;
  end;
end;

procedure TWorkShift.SetSales(const Value: TList<TSale>);
begin
  if Assigned(fSales) then
  begin
    fSales.OnNotify := fNotifySales;
    fNotifySales := nil;
  end;

  fSales := Value;

  if Assigned(fSales) then
  begin
    fNotifySales := fSales.OnNotify;
    fSales.OnNotify := NotifySales;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Stefan. I tried your approach after I posted this question and altough it works as intented I think it complicates things and find Nick´s approach simpler and easier to understand. Thanks for your answer I was very valuable for my experimentation. –  Luis Carrasco Apr 28 '12 at 5:21

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