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I have a data structure class that is a child of a larger data/state class.

The inner data structure fires an event when the contained data changes. This event is consumed by the larger data/state class. The data/state class then fires its own event so that it may pass additional information along to the next event handler.

Public class Data
{
    //properties and objects go here

    public int Count
    {
        get { return _count; }
        internal set 
        {
            //if the count grew simply set _count
            if (value != _oldCount)
            {
                _oldCount = _count;
                _count = value;
            }
            //if the count shrank then set the count and trigger an event if the count is under 100
            else
            {
                _oldCount = _count;
                _count = value;
                if (_count < 100)
                {
                    CountChanged(this, new EventArgs());
                }
            }
        }
    }
    public event EventHandler CountChanged;
}

The above event is consumed by this event handler

Data.CountChanged += new EventHandler(DataCountChanged);
private void DataCountChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    DataRemoved(this, e);  //Handle the old event and trigger a new event to pass along more information
}
public event EventHandler DataRemoved;

Finally the second event should be handled by another event handler to do some work. Unfortunately the call to trigger the second event fails with a NullReferenceException more often than not. Why?

----EDIT---- I understand that checking for Null will prevent the exception. The confusion is why this event is Null in the first place =D

share|improve this question
    
Simple, nobody subscribe an event handler for it. Not in your code snippet either. – Hans Passant Apr 27 '12 at 1:46
    
Data.CountChanged += new EventHandler(DataCountChanged); Isn't this the event handler subscription for the event? – Ritz Apr 27 '12 at 2:23
    
No, it bombed on DataRemoved. – Hans Passant Apr 27 '12 at 3:19
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should always raise events using the following pattern to avoid null references and threading issues:

private void DataCountChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var dr = DataRemoved;
    if (dr != null)
    {
        dr(this, e);
    }
}

The reason the handler is null is that it should be viewed as a special collection of delegates. When the collection is empty the delegate has a null value. When you attach one or more handlers the collection is no longer empty and thus is no longer null.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the best way possible. If more than one thread is executing and can (potentially) set the event handler to null, then this completely bypasses the issue of ever getting a null reference. – Mike Bantegui Apr 27 '12 at 3:11
if(DataRemoved != null && DataRemoved.GetInvocationList().Length > 0)
            {
            }
share|improve this answer

Assigning an empty delegate to your events may not be such a good design practice. Events are essentially delegates which are like function pointers. In other words, they are just like other reference members in your class. Unless you assign them a value or subscribe to them, they will be and should be null.

The null reference exception you get is for the same reason as declaring private MyClass; and then trying to use it before it has been assigned a value.

When you subscribe to an event, you are essentially telling the event which function to call. If your event does not have at least one such function pointer, it would not be in existence (NULL).

share|improve this answer
1  
It is also worth noting that unlike other reference types, events/delegates can have more than one value. That is why we use the += and -= notation for assignment. This way you can have the event call more than one of your subscribing functions. Example: Form_Load1() and Form_Load2(), not that I wuld recommend doing that. – Raheel Khan Apr 27 '12 at 2:39

There is a trick to avoid the null check:

Just initialize your event as follows:

public event YourDelegate MyEvent = delegate { };

This way you do not need to check for nulls just call the event as usual:

this.MyEvent("Hi there!");

Edited

To clarify:

Declaring an event like this:

public event Action MyEvent;

It's translated automatically to:

private Action myEvent;
public event Action MyEvent
{
   add
   {
      this.myEvent += value;
   }
   remove
   {
      this.myEvent -= value;
   }
}

Therefore initializing an event like this:

public event Action MyEvent = delegate { };

It's safe because external code can not assign a null to the event itself.

You can however, assign null to the event inside the class it was declares but what really is happening is that, you are assigning null to the private delegate used by the event.

Source: Jon Skeet, C# In Depth, Events

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that checking for Null will prevent the exception. The confusion is why this event is Null in the first place =D – Ritz Apr 27 '12 at 0:56
2  
This is a bad pattern. The event is a public field that can be modified by external code. Someone could write x.MyEvent = null; and your code will fail. You should always do an assignment followed by the null check before raising the event. – Enigmativity Apr 27 '12 at 2:22
    
I appreciate the advise but before posting you should inform yourself. I dare you to try to actually assign any value to an event =) at least in the framework 4 you can not do it F.Y.I and that's the basics about events, events are not fields they look like fields but they are not, they behave like methods. Read this: csharpindepth.com/Articles/Chapter2/Events.aspx I highly recommend you to read C# in dept from Jon Skeet. Quoting: "People often find it difficult to see the difference between events and delegates". You can assign a null to a delegate but NOT TO AN EVENT – Jupaol Apr 27 '12 at 2:49
    
@Jupaol: Sorry but that's wrong. The page doesn't say you can't assign null to an event. ideone.com/93pfd. I would not advocate this approach at all because it invites hard to find errors. – Mike Bantegui Apr 27 '12 at 3:08
    
You can assign an event null only inside the class where it was declared, that was the original point in the first place – Jupaol Apr 27 '12 at 3:16

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