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I have got a list containing nested lists like this :

[ [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 10, 0, 0), 0.0011] , [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 11, 0, 0), 0.0013 , [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 12, 0, 0), 0.0014]]

etc..

How do I go about adding sub elements 2 by 2 like this :

sum(0.0011,0.0013) + 0.0014

then taking the result of this sum and adding it to the next sub element ?

I`m basically trying to compound the values .

thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way to do this is with the sum() builtin and a generator expression:

>>>items = [[datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 10, 0, 0), 0.0011], [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 11, 0, 0), 0.0013 ], [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 12, 0, 0), 0.0014]]
>>>sum(item[1] for item in items)
0.0038000000000000004

Edit:

If you want to print out the result of each stage of the summation, you want to use functools.reduce() (which, in 2.x is the reduce builtin).

from functools import reduce
import datetime

items = [[datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 10, 0, 0), 0.0011], [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 11, 0, 0), 0.0013 ], [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 12, 0, 0), 0.0014]]

def add_printing_result(a, b):
    total = a+b
    print(total)
    return total

reduce(add_printing_result, (item[1] for item in items))

Which gives us:

0.0024000000000000002
0.0038000000000000004
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thanks for that, however this would give me the total ( interesting though since I was going the long way around using a reduce function ) . How do I get it to print out each sum instead of the total ? –  Finger twist Apr 27 '12 at 1:26
    
@Julz Edited to give that solution. –  Lattyware Apr 27 '12 at 2:00
sum = 0, myarr = [ [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 10, 0, 0), 0.0011] , [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 11, 0, 0), 0.0013] , [datetime.datetime(2000, 12, 12, 0, 0), 0.0014]]

for(i in myarr):
    sum+=i[1]

I'm sure there are better ways to do this (I'm no Python expert) but this should sum your values properly such that sum is the sub elements' sum.

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This is pretty un-pythonic, and wrong, I'm afraid. var is not a keyword in Python (meaning that line is a syntax error, not to mention the list literal that doesn't add up to the right number of brackets), and when you are looping over a list, loop over it, don't loop over a range and then access with index. –  Lattyware Apr 27 '12 at 1:09
    
Good points, thanks. I do mostly Javascript these days, hence the var. –  Elliot Bonneville Apr 27 '12 at 1:10

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