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What is the most efficient way to determine if exactly two elements in a list are the same? For example:

>>> has1dup(["one", "one", "two"])
True
>>> has1dup(["one", "two", "three"])
False
>>> has1dup(["one", "one", "one"])
False

I have successfully done this using if/else statements. However, if the list were larger, the task of writing out each possibility for a pair would become very difficult and time consuming. Is there a faster/simpler way to accomplish this?

Here is what I have tried:

def has1dup(lst):
    if lst[0] == lst[1] and lst[1] != lst[2]:
        return True
    elif lst[1] == lst[2] and lst[2] != lst[0]:
        return True
    elif lst[0] == lst[2] and lst[2] != lst[1]:
        return True
    else:
        return False
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12 Answers 12

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can see how many unique values are there with a set. If there is one less item in the set than in the list, one was a duplicate:

def has1dup(lst):
    return len(lst)-1 == len(set(lst))
share|improve this answer
    
I disagree with @minitech. By the Pigeonhole Principle, if the number of distinct items is one less than the number of items, then there are indeed exactly two items that are the same as each other. –  minopret Apr 27 '12 at 1:10
    
It checks if exactly two items in the list are the same. You cant generalize to find tripples though (they might just be two pairs), but that wasn't the question. –  Jochen Ritzel Apr 27 '12 at 1:12
    
@minopret: Oops, I misread the code. Never mind. –  minitech Apr 27 '12 at 1:14
    
+1, same as the solution I eventually came up with (after misreading question) but yours was more succinct. –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:24
    
This only works if the elements in the list implement __hash__ (which is true of most builtin-types), but stuff like has1dup([[1], [1], [2]]) will raise an error, since lists are not hashable. Even user defined objects will not behave as expected if hash is not "significant". has1dup([X(), X(), Y()]) for X and Y defined as empty classes returns False. Since the question uses strings, this shouldn't be a problem, though. –  jotomicron Apr 27 '12 at 1:39
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>>> from collection import Counter
>>> 2 in Counter(["one", "one", "two"]).values()
True
>>> 2 in Counter(["one", "two", "three"]).values()
False

update
If you want there are only two same items

Counter(seq).values().count(2) == 1

The Counter works for Python 2.7+, for lower versions you could do it manually

def counter(seq): 
    r = {}
    for x in seq:
        r[x] = r.setdefault(x, 0) + 1 # or defaultdict
    return r
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure that will work properly on the list 1,1,2,2. Isn't it supposed to be exactly two elements? –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:19
    
Sorry, okm, I have reversed my downvote because the question title does indeed specify two of three - it's only a section in the question body that asks about longer lists (as an additional point). –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:32
    
@paxdiablo that's fine, the question is not that clear and determined, I've updated the answer also. –  okm Apr 27 '12 at 2:38
    
@paxdiablo About your comment "the list 1,1,2,2. Isn't it supposed to be exactly two elements?", did you implicitly mean that [1, 1, 2, 2] is supposed to be exactly two elements or negative? I'm not native English speaker and want to make sure the actual meaning of your words. If it's the first one, seems you was confused as well =p –  okm Apr 27 '12 at 9:05
    
I think 1,1,2,2 should return false since it doesn't have exactly two values that are identical - it actually has two groups of two. So 1,1,2,3,4,5,6,7 would be true but 1,1,2,2,3,4,5,6,7 would give false. That's my understanding but, as everyone points out, the question could be clearer. –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 11:28
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You can do this very easily and nicely using the any() builtin:

def has_duplicates(seq):
    return any(seq.count(x) > 1 for x in seq)

Example:

>>> has_duplicates([1, 1, 2])
True
>>> has_duplicates([1, 2, 2])
True
>>> has_duplicates([1, 2, 3])
False

If you only want to find where two and only two items are the same, just change the condition:

any(seq.count(x) == 2 for x in seq)

If you want to find where there is one, and only one instance of two, and only two items, we can do that too, although it requires more work:

def any_n(iterable, n):
    seen = 0
    for value in iterable:
        if value:
            if seen >= n:
                return False
            else:
                seen += 1
    return seen == n

def has_one_value_repeated_n_times(seq, n):
    return any_n((seq.count(x) == n for x in seq), n)

Some quick tests:

tests = [
    [1,2,2,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,5,5,5,5,5],
    [1,2,2,3,3,4,4,4,4,5,5,5,5,5],
    [1,2,2],
    [1,1,2],
    [1,2,3],
]

for test in tests:
    print(test, "-", has_one_value_repeated_n_times(test, 2))

Giving us:

[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5] - True
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5] - False
[1, 2, 2] - True
[1, 1, 2] - True
[1, 2, 3] - False
share|improve this answer
    
Still the same problem as with one other solution. The list 1,2,2,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,5,5,5,5,5 will return true in this case, no? That's not exactly two dupes. Even allowing for a list size of three, 1,1,1 will return true for your function despite it being wrong. –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:26
    
Trivially fixed, though. –  kindall Apr 27 '12 at 1:30
    
And downvote reversed though you should probably make it clear that this works only for the three-item list. –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:34
    
Added the even narrower solution. –  Lattyware Apr 27 '12 at 1:37
1  
This is an O(N^2) algorithm. Do not use this for large lists (e.g. 1000+ elements) or where performance is a factor. –  ninjagecko Apr 28 '12 at 14:44
show 1 more comment
2 in collections.Counter(yourList).values()

Short and efficient.

If you mean "exactly" as in "among the multiplicities of elements, there is exactly one element with multiplicity 2", then you do:

Counter(Counter(yourList).values()).get(2)==1
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[1,2,2,3,3] will return True, which doesn't fulfill the 'exactly' requirement –  gnr Apr 28 '12 at 14:33
    
@mlauria: It does, unless you mean "exactly" as in "among the multiplicities of elements, there is exactly one element with multiplicity 2". In which case: Counter(Counter(yourList).values()).get(2)==1 –  ninjagecko Apr 28 '12 at 14:39
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I don't know Python, but here's some pseudocode:

for i in 0 to length(list):
    j = indexOf(list, list[i], i + 1) > -1

    if j > -1 and indexOf(list, list[i], j + 1) == -1:
        // Found exactly two!

It should be efficient enough for your needs.

EDIT: Okay, I turned it into Python. Sorry if it's not good code.

def exactlyTwo(l):
    for i in xrange(0, len(l)):
        try:
            j = l.index(l[i], i + 1)

            try:
                l.index(l[i], j + 1)
            except ValueError:
                return True
        except ValueError:
            # Do nothing. Not sure how to do that in Python.
            0

    return False

Here's a demo.

share|improve this answer
    
pass is how you do that in Python, by the way. –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:22
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If only one/none of the elements are repeated, and you can represent the elements as positive integers (say by mapping "one" to 1 using a dict)

Then the following solution would work

def find_repeated_element(l):
    return reduce(lambda x,y: x^y, l + list(set(l)))

l = [1,1,2]
>>> find_repeated_element(l)
1
l = [1,2,3]
>>> find_repeated_element(l)
0
l = [1,1,1]
>>> find_repeated_element(l)
0
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There's nothing wrong with the code you have (at least for lists of size three) - it's readable and fairly succinct and you should really only worry about performance if it becomes a problem.

The chances of a solution like set conversion being much faster than three conditionals is unlikely though not impossible.

I'd prefer a slightly different form to reduce "indentation hell" :-)

if list[0] == list[1] and list[1] != list[2]:
    return True

if list[1] == list[2] and list[2] != list[0]:
    return True

if list[0] == list[2] and list[2] != list[1]:
    return True

return False

Or, if you prefer to see as much code at once on your screen/printout:

if list[0] == list[1] and list[1] != list[2]: return True
if list[1] == list[2] and list[2] != list[0]: return True
if list[0] == list[2] and list[2] != list[1]: return True
return False

For larger arrays, you can turn it into a set and, if the length of the set is one less than the length of the array, there was exactly one duplicate:

>>> a = [1,2,3,4,4,5,6,7]
>>> a
[1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7]
>>> len(a) == len (set(a)) + 1
True
share|improve this answer
2  
There's also the concern of dealing with larger lists. –  Michael Mior Apr 27 '12 at 1:10
    
@MichaelMior, I've added to the end for larger lists but the question title explicitly stated two of three. The body asked for a solution where the list is larger which is why I added the set variant. –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:35
2  
@paxdiablo this latter solution is incomplete as it's assuming there is not any other items having same values. –  okm Apr 27 '12 at 2:44
    
@okm, not sure I understand. Since the set removes dupes, the only situation in which the length of the set is one less than the length of the array is when every element in the array is unique except for one, which has exactly two entries. Any other case will involve a length difference of something other than 1. For example, 1,2,2,2,3 will result in a difference of 2, 1,2,3 gives a difference of 0, 1,2,2,3,3,3,4,4,4,4 gives a difference of 6 and so on. –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 7:37
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I'd try this: len(set(my_list)) == 2

But then I see that in the case (3 items) where that works, we can do much better: > python -c 'from timeit import Timer; t1 = Timer("a[0] == a[1] != a[2] or a[0] == a[2] != a[1] or a[1] == a[2] != a[0]", setup="""a=["one","one","two"]"""); t2 = Timer("len(set(a)) == 2", setup="""a=["one","one","two"]"""); print t1.timeit(), t2.timeit()'

0.893960952759 2.28438997269

share|improve this answer
1  
This checks that the list only contains two distinct elements, which isn't the same thing. –  Michael Mior Apr 27 '12 at 1:06
    
The title of the question says two of three, and the question asks for the most efficient. > python -c 'from timeit import Timer; t1 = Timer("len(set(a)) == 2", setup="""a=["one","one","two"]"""); t2 = Timer("len(set(a)) == len(a) - 1", setup="""a=["one","one","two"]"""); print t1.timeit(), t2.timeit()' 2.32463097572 2.84631896019 –  minopret Apr 27 '12 at 1:25
    
The full question states "However, if the list were larger, the task of writing out each possibility for a pair would become very difficult and time consuming." and makes no mention of lists with only three elements. Perhaps some clarification from the OP is required. –  Michael Mior Apr 27 '12 at 3:26
    
@Michael, as stated, the title states "two of three" as does the example in the question. I see if "if the list were larger" bit as a secondary question. –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 7:42
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Since we need to do pairwise comparisons, how about using itertools.product to create a sequence of all of the pair comparisons?

from itertools import product

tests = """\
AAB
ABC
ABB
ABA
AAA""".splitlines()

def has_exactly_one_doubled_element(t):
    return sum(map(lambda a:a[0]==a[1], product(t,t))) == 5

for t in tests:
    print t, has_exactly_one_doubled_element(t)

prints:

AAB True
ABC False
ABB True
ABA True
AAA False

So then, how did I come up with the magic number of 5? The pairs returned by product are each element paired with an element from a second copy of the list. If all 3 are different, then they will each compare as equal to themselves but none others, so the total will be 3. If 2 are the same, then in addition to the 3 matches, the two duplicates will compare equal to each other once in each direction, so add 2 to 3 to get 5. If all 3 are the same, then each element will match with every other element, for 3*3 or 9 matches.

Here is a general solution for a list of any length, to see if there is exactly one duplicated value (also uses operator.__eq__ and itertools.starmap to avoid passing a lambda to map):

from operator import __eq__ as EQ
from itertools import product, starmap

def has_exactly_one_doubled_element(t):
    return sum(starmap(EQ, product(t,t))) == len(t)+2

args = ["ABCD"]*4
tests = map(''.join, product(*args))
for t in tests:
    print t, has_exactly_one_doubled_element(t)

Prints:

AAAA False
AAAB False
AAAC False
AAAD False
AABA False
AABB False
AABC True
AABD True
AACA False
AACB True
AACC False
AACD True
AADA False
AADB True
AADC True
AADD False
ABAA False
ABAB False
ABAC True
ABAD True
ABBA False
ABBB False
ABBC True
ABBD True
ABCA True
ABCB True
ABCC True
ABCD False
ABDA True
ABDB True
ABDC False
ABDD True
ACAA False
ACAB True
ACAC False
ACAD True
ACBA True
ACBB True
ACBC True
ACBD False
ACCA False
ACCB True
ACCC False
ACCD True
ACDA True
ACDB False
ACDC True
ACDD True
ADAA False
ADAB True
ADAC True
ADAD False
ADBA True
ADBB True
ADBC False
ADBD True
ADCA True
ADCB False
ADCC True
ADCD True
ADDA False
ADDB True
ADDC True
ADDD False
BAAA False
BAAB False
BAAC True
BAAD True
BABA False
BABB False
BABC True
BABD True
BACA True
BACB True
BACC True
BACD False
BADA True
BADB True
BADC False
BADD True
BBAA False
BBAB False
BBAC True
BBAD True
BBBA False
BBBB False
BBBC False
BBBD False
BBCA True
BBCB False
BBCC False
BBCD True
BBDA True
BBDB False
BBDC True
BBDD False
BCAA True
BCAB True
BCAC True
BCAD False
BCBA True
BCBB False
BCBC False
BCBD True
BCCA True
BCCB False
BCCC False
BCCD True
BCDA False
BCDB True
BCDC True
BCDD True
BDAA True
BDAB True
BDAC False
BDAD True
BDBA True
BDBB False
BDBC True
BDBD False
BDCA False
BDCB True
BDCC True
BDCD True
BDDA True
BDDB False
BDDC True
BDDD False
CAAA False
CAAB True
CAAC False
CAAD True
CABA True
CABB True
CABC True
CABD False
CACA False
CACB True
CACC False
CACD True
CADA True
CADB False
CADC True
CADD True
CBAA True
CBAB True
CBAC True
CBAD False
CBBA True
CBBB False
CBBC False
CBBD True
CBCA True
CBCB False
CBCC False
CBCD True
CBDA False
CBDB True
CBDC True
CBDD True
CCAA False
CCAB True
CCAC False
CCAD True
CCBA True
CCBB False
CCBC False
CCBD True
CCCA False
CCCB False
CCCC False
CCCD False
CCDA True
CCDB True
CCDC False
CCDD False
CDAA True
CDAB False
CDAC True
CDAD True
CDBA False
CDBB True
CDBC True
CDBD True
CDCA True
CDCB True
CDCC False
CDCD False
CDDA True
CDDB True
CDDC False
CDDD False
DAAA False
DAAB True
DAAC True
DAAD False
DABA True
DABB True
DABC False
DABD True
DACA True
DACB False
DACC True
DACD True
DADA False
DADB True
DADC True
DADD False
DBAA True
DBAB True
DBAC False
DBAD True
DBBA True
DBBB False
DBBC True
DBBD False
DBCA False
DBCB True
DBCC True
DBCD True
DBDA True
DBDB False
DBDC True
DBDD False
DCAA True
DCAB False
DCAC True
DCAD True
DCBA False
DCBB True
DCBC True
DCBD True
DCCA True
DCCB True
DCCC False
DCCD False
DCDA True
DCDB True
DCDC False
DCDD False
DDAA False
DDAB True
DDAC True
DDAD False
DDBA True
DDBB False
DDBC True
DDBD False
DDCA True
DDCB True
DDCC False
DDCD False
DDDA False
DDDB False
DDDC False
DDDD False
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def exactlyTwo(elements):
    return sum(elements.count(i)-1 for i in elements) == 2

works for unhashable elements, and where 'exactly two elements' means triplets and two doubles should return False

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def checkk(lis):
  sett=set(lis)
  for ele in sett:
     if lis.count(ele)==2:
       return 'yes'
  else:
     return 'no'


x=list(["one", "one", "two"])
y=list(["one", "two", "three"])
z=list(["one", "one", "one"])
w=list(["one", "two", "two"])
print(checkk(x))
print(checkk(y))
print(checkk(z))
print(checkk(w))

output:

yes
no
no
yes
share|improve this answer
    
And for one/two/two, what does this do (once you fix the indentation of course)? –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:28
    
@paxdiablo indentation is perfect(for-else loop). code is running fine and i added one/two/two to the solution, it returns 'yes'. –  undefined is not a function Apr 27 '12 at 1:34
    
for-else - well, bugger me, I never knew such a beast even existed. +1 for educating me. One question, why would you just not return no no matter what (ie, ditch the else line)? –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:38
    
The question asked about exactly two elements, how would your code work for [1,1,2,2] ? –  Akavall Apr 27 '12 at 1:40
1  
@paxdiablo well the trick is, in for-else loop the else part runs only when the for loop completes successfully(without any break or return) –  undefined is not a function Apr 27 '12 at 1:47
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You could try

list(["one", "one", "two"]).count("one") == 2
share|improve this answer
4  
That won't work so well for one/two/two :-) –  paxdiablo Apr 27 '12 at 1:03
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