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Given an integer, how do I strip the leading zeroes off its binary representation?

I am using bit-wise operators to manipulate its binary representation. I am trying to see if an integer is a palindrome in its binary representation. I know there are different solutions out there but I wanted to compare the first and last bit, second and last but one bit and so on. So, I was wondering how to strip those leading 0's for this int.

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7  
Perhaps a silly question, but how are your getting its binary representation? –  user7116 Apr 27 '12 at 1:45
    
Using bit-wise operators to manipulate its binary representation. I am trying to see if an integer is a palindrome in its binary representation. I know there are different solutions out there but I wanted to compare the first and last bit, second and last but one bit and so on. So, I was wondering how to strip those leading 0's for this int. –  Bugaboo Apr 27 '12 at 1:51
    
You could try converting it to a string and using std::string::find_first_not_of. –  chris Apr 27 '12 at 1:54
1  
@JKD: no it's not. –  user7116 Apr 27 '12 at 5:32
1  
@JKD: Comments are not questions. –  user7116 Apr 28 '12 at 1:41

3 Answers 3

You can use BitScanForward and BitScanReverse (the exact names vary by compiler) to efficiently trim (well, skip processing of) zeros from either side.

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You can find the first bit set by finding the log base 2 of the number:

/* from Bit Twiddling Hacks */
static const unsigned int MultiplyDeBruijnBitPosition[32] = 
{
    0, 9, 1, 10, 13, 21, 2, 29, 11, 14, 16, 18, 22, 25, 3, 30,
    8, 12, 20, 28, 15, 17, 24, 7, 19, 27, 23, 6, 26, 5, 4, 31
};

uint32_t pos = value;
pos |= pos >> 1;
pos |= pos >> 2;
pos |= pos >> 4;
pos |= pos >> 8;
pos |= pos >> 16;
pos = MultiplyDeBruijnBitPosition[(uint32_t)(pos * 0x07C4ACDDU) >> 27];

Or if you need a mask, just adapt finding the next power of 2:

/* adapted from Bit Twiddling Hacks */
uint32_t mask = value - 1;
mask |= mask >> 1;
mask |= mask >> 2;
mask |= mask >> 4;
mask |= mask >> 8;
mask |= mask >> 16;
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0x07C4ACDDU Can you cite your sources? –  ildjarn Apr 27 '12 at 4:25
    
Sure, click the links in the post... –  user7116 Apr 27 '12 at 5:30

Here's the answer posted in How to check if the binary representation of an integer is a palindrome?

You first reverse the bits using this function:

/* flip n */
unsigned int flip(unsigned int n)
{
    int i, newInt = 0;
    for (i=0; i<WORDSIZE; ++i)
    {
        newInt += (n & 0x0001);
        newInt <<= 1;
        n >>= 1;
    }
    return newInt;
}

Then remove the trailing zeros:

int flipped = flip(n);
/* shift to remove trailing zeroes */
while (!(flipped & 0x0001))
    flipped >>= 1;

To answer your comment about checking to see if the int is a palindrome, just compare the bit-shifted flipped version with the original:

return n == flipped;
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I think this one is pretty ineffective. –  polkovnikov.ph Jun 14 '14 at 7:29

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