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I have an JPA/Hibernate/Spring/Tomcat web application with second level data cache enabled for performance reasons. And the cache does its work very well!

I also have a Cucumber test suite which adds some test data directly to the application's database and then performs some Selenium steps. Of course it fails as the application doesn't see the updates because of the 2nd level cache.

I know I can make special build for testing with cache disabled (by passing some boolean property for Maven filtering or similar) But there are a lot of @Cache annotated entities so disabling the cache makes the application fail with exception "Second level cache is not enabled".

Another approach could be to use ehcache remoting to clear the cache or configure it with zero object lifetime or similar.

I can also create my test data using application UI only but this adds unnecessary complexity to the test cases so I prefer to write them to the DB before test run.

Could anybody share their approach to integration-test applications with 2nd level data cache enabled?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since you're talking about functional tests via Selenium, you should consider your app as a black box and test it as Selenium was actually a User. So you need to pass data via web interface and then test how the app processes it and shows it afterwards.

Alternative to such application-wide functional tests will be a Behavior Driven Development with tests for different components. Component here is some flow starting from your controller ending with DAO (usually DAO is mocked in such tests which make them pass very fast, but doesn't test working with database). In this case you have a small set of full environment tests and a large set of BDD tests.

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Not all, but some of my BDD tests have the following steps: create test data, do selenium things, cleanup. Agree with the black box, but creating and cleaning the data using UI is extremely hard sometimes and could make tests dependend on each other (if UI related to saving is broken, all other tests which needs something to be saved are broken as well) –  ike3 Apr 27 '12 at 9:10
    
Yes, the dependent tests will fail, but the main purpose - something fails, is met. And if you fill data into DB directly, then it's not an acceptance tests in essence, this is not how the end-users work with the app. And such tests should be more or less coarse-grained. If you need more fine-grained ones, this might be a bad place for Selenium. –  ctapobep Apr 27 '12 at 10:51

If you need to test the second level cache with unit test you have to be sure to close the session and open it each time you are calling dao method. Otherwise you will use first level cache which exist only in the scope of one/current hibernate session.

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I had a requirement of implementing read only caching for few beans like country, region etc..

To check if they are really getting cached I have written a integration test with using spring. The test is not so proper, it is just a verification of what I wanted to get. You can use this as a hint and implement your own.

You can read here for an article on how to write an integration test using spring.

@Configurable(autowire = Autowire.BY_NAME)
@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = { "classpath:applicationContext.xml" })
public class HibernateCachingTestIntg {

    @Autowired
    private ConfigurationDAO configurationDAO;

    @Autowired
    private CountryDAO countryDAO;

    @Test
    public void testGetCountries() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            StopWatch sw = new StopWatch("C");
            sw.start();
            countryDAO.listCountries();
            sw.stop();
            System.out.println(sw);
        }

    }

    @Test
    public void testGetRegionList() {

        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            StopWatch sw = new StopWatch("R");
            sw.start();
            configurationDAO.getRegionList();
            sw.stop();
            System.out.println(sw);
        }

    }
}

And here is the output:-

StopWatch 'C': running time (millis) = 217; [] took 217 = 100%
StopWatch 'C': running time (millis) = 15; [] took 15 = 100%
StopWatch 'C': running time (millis) = 16; [] took 16 = 100%
StopWatch 'C': running time (millis) = 15; [] took 15 = 100%
StopWatch 'C': running time (millis) = 16; [] took 16 = 100%

StopWatch 'R': running time (millis) = 201; [] took 201 = 100%
StopWatch 'R': running time (millis) = 15; [] took 15 = 100%
StopWatch 'R': running time (millis) = 0; [] took 0 = 0%
StopWatch 'R': running time (millis) = 16; [] took 16 = 100%
StopWatch 'R': running time (millis) = 15; [] took 15 = 100%

As you can see here, the query takes more time to execute for the first time and less time afterwords. If you turn the query logger on, you can see that the SQL is fired only for the first time.

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Thanks. Spring-test works fine as it works within a single persistent context but acceptance tests insert the data within a separate context. My intention is to test functional logic with some read-write cached entities not the cache itself –  ike3 Apr 27 '12 at 4:43

Although making acceptance tests independent on the DB is preferable it requires too much rewriting so I currently decided just to create very simple implementations of org.hibernate.cache.Cache and org.hibernate.cache.CacheProvider interfaces which does nothing and acts as an always empty cache.

The test build replaces the real cache with this new one that makes both hibernate annotations and BDD steps happy.

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