Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to simply check if a string value is a valid float value. Calling to_f on a string will convert it to 0.0 if it is not a numeric value. And using Float() raises an exception when it is passed an invalid float string which is closer to what I want, but I don't want to handle catching exceptions. What I really want is a method such as nan? which does exist in the Float class, but that doesn't help because a non-numeric string cannot be converted to a float without being changed to 0.0 (using to_f).

"a".to_f => 0.0

"a".to_f.nan? => false

Float("a") => ArgumentError: invalid value for Float(): "a"

Is there a simple solution for this or do I need to write code to check if a string is a valid float value?

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

An interesting fact about the Ruby world is the existence of the Rubinius project, which implements Ruby and its standard library mostly in pure Ruby. As a result, they have a pure Ruby implementation of Kernel#Float, which looks like:

def Float(obj)
  raise TypeError, "can't convert nil into Float" if obj.nil?

  if obj.is_a?(String)
    if obj !~ /^\s*[+-]?((\d+_?)*\d+(\.(\d+_?)*\d+)?|\.(\d+_?)*\d+)(\s*|([eE][+-]?(\d+_?)*\d+)\s*)$/
      raise ArgumentError, "invalid value for Float(): #{obj.inspect}"
    end
  end

  Type.coerce_to(obj, Float, :to_f)
end

This provides you with a regular expression that matches the internal work Ruby does when it runs Float(), but without the exception. So you could now do:

class String
  def nan?
    self !~ /^\s*[+-]?((\d+_?)*\d+(\.(\d+_?)*\d+)?|\.(\d+_?)*\d+)(\s*|([eE][+-]?(\d+_?)*\d+)\s*)$/
  end
end

The nice thing about this solution is that since Rubinius runs, and passes RubySpec, you know this regex handles the edge-cases that Ruby itself handles, and you can call to_f on the String without any fear!

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer! Note: This regex has evolved a bit in Rubinius' implementation, see the specs at github.com/rubinius/rubinius/blob/master/spec/ruby/core/string/… for details. Keep in mind also that if you're using this to validate user input, you might want to leave out support for underscores and just use the Rubinius' regex for inspiration :) –  CaptainPete Feb 28 '12 at 4:29
    
Correction, Rubinius still uses that same regex for Float(). Find the code at github.com/rubinius/rubinius/blob/master/kernel/common/… –  CaptainPete Feb 28 '12 at 4:39
add comment

Here's one way:

class String
  def valid_float?
    # The double negation turns this into an actual boolean true - if you're 
    # okay with "truthy" values (like 0.0), you can remove it.
    !!Float(self) rescue false
  end
end

"a".valid_float? #false
"2.4".valid_float? #true

If you want to avoid the monkey-patch of String, you could always make this a class method of some module you control, of course:

module MyUtils
  def self.valid_float?(str)
    !!Float(str) rescue false
  end
end
MyUtils.valid_float?("a") #false
share|improve this answer
add comment
# Edge Cases:
# numeric?"Infinity" => true is_numeric?"Infinity" => false


def numeric?(object)
true if Float(object) rescue false
end

#Possibly faster alternative
def is_numeric?(i)
i.to_i.to_s == i || i.to_f.to_s == i
end
share|improve this answer
    
NB the 'faster alternative' will return false for '5.00' –  Lambart Aug 13 '13 at 19:53
add comment

I tried to add this as a comment but apparently there is no formatting in comments:

on the other hand, why not just use that as your conversion function, like

class String
  def to_float
    Float self rescue (0.0 / 0.0)
  end
end
"a".to_float.nan? => true

which of course is what you didn't want to do in the first place. I guess the answer is, "you have to write your own function if you really don't want to use exception handling, but, why would you do that?"

share|improve this answer
    
I just wanted to be clear that the use of 0.0 / 0.0 is a dirty hack but if you want to get NaN it is currently the only way (that I know of). If it were my program I would strongly consider using nil instead. –  Sam Jun 23 '09 at 19:22
add comment

Umm, if you don't want exceptions then perhaps:

def is_float?(fl)
   fl =~ /(^(\d+)(\.)?(\d+)?)|(^(\d+)?(\.)(\d+))/
end

Since OP specifically asked for a solution without exceptions. Regexp based solution is marginally slow:

require "benchmark"
n = 500000

def is_float?(fl)
  !!Float(fl) rescue false
end

def is_float_reg(fl)
  fl =~ /(^(\d+)(\.)?(\d+)?)|(^(\d+)?(\.)(\d+))/
end

Benchmark.bm(7) do |x|
  x.report("Using cast") {
    n.times do |i|
      temp_fl = "#{i + 0.5}"
      is_float?(temp_fl)
    end
  }
  x.report("using regexp") {
    n.times do |i|
      temp_fl = "#{i + 0.5}"
      is_float_reg(temp_fl)
    end
  }
end

Results:

5286 snippets:master!? % 
             user     system      total        real
Using cast  3.000000   0.000000   3.000000 (  3.010926)
using regexp  5.020000   0.000000   5.020000 (  5.021762)
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't the Float cast a native routine while the regex above much slower? –  Julian Jun 24 '09 at 13:32
    
"Regexp based solution is marginally slow" - check you numbers again 3/5 equates to 60%. I wouldn't call losing 40% as a marginal drop. –  Chris McCauley Jun 24 '09 at 16:05
    
Also, keep in mind that if your casting will raise exceptions more frequently then not, it will be much much slower then the regexp. This is because rescuing from an exception is very slow, as show here: simonecarletti.com/blog/2010/01/how-slow-are-ruby-exceptions –  Anlek Feb 20 '12 at 17:50
add comment

I saw the unresolved discussion on cast+exceptions vs regex and I thought I would try to benchmark everything and produce an objective answer:

Here is the source for the best case and worst of each method attempted here:

require "benchmark"
n = 500000

def is_float?(fl)
  !!Float(fl) rescue false
end

def is_float_reg(fl)
  fl =~ /(^(\d+)(\.)?(\d+)?)|(^(\d+)?(\.)(\d+))/
end

class String
  def to_float
    Float self rescue (0.0 / 0.0)
  end
end


Benchmark.bm(7) do |x|
  x.report("Using cast best case") {
    n.times do |i|
      temp_fl = "#{i + 0.5}"
      is_float?(temp_fl)
    end
  }
  x.report("Using cast worst case") {
    n.times do |i|
      temp_fl = "asdf#{i + 0.5}"
      is_float?(temp_fl)
    end
  }
  x.report("Using cast2 best case") {
    n.times do |i|
      "#{i + 0.5}".to_float
    end
  }
  x.report("Using cast2 worst case") {
    n.times do |i|
      "asdf#{i + 0.5}".to_float
    end
  }
  x.report("Using regexp short") {
    n.times do |i|
      temp_fl = "#{i + 0.5}"
      is_float_reg(temp_fl)
    end
  }
  x.report("Using regexp long") {
    n.times do |i|
      temp_fl = "12340918234981234#{i + 0.5}"
      is_float_reg(temp_fl)
    end
  }
    x.report("Using regexp short fail") {
    n.times do |i|
      temp_fl = "asdf#{i + 0.5}"
      is_float_reg(temp_fl)
    end
  }
  x.report("Using regexp long fail") {
    n.times do |i|
      temp_fl = "12340918234981234#{i + 0.5}asdf"
      is_float_reg(temp_fl)
    end
  }

end

With the following results with mri193:

              user     system      total        real
Using cast best case  0.608000   0.000000   0.608000 (  0.615000)
Using cast worst case  5.647000   0.094000   5.741000 (  5.745000)
Using cast2 best case  0.593000   0.000000   0.593000 (  0.586000)
Using cast2 worst case  5.788000   0.047000   5.835000 (  5.839000)
Using regexp short  0.951000   0.000000   0.951000 (  0.952000)
Using regexp long  1.217000   0.000000   1.217000 (  1.214000)
Using regexp short fail  1.201000   0.000000   1.201000 (  1.202000)
Using regexp long fail  1.295000   0.000000   1.295000 (  1.284000)

Since we are dealing with only Linear time algorithms I think we use empirical measurements to make generalizations. It is plain to see that regex is more consistent and will only fluctuate a bit based on the length of the string passed. The cast is clearly faster when there are no failure, and much slower when there are failures.

If we compare the success times we can see that the cast best case is about .3 seconds faster than regex best case. If we divide this by the amount of time in the case worst case we can estimate how many runs it would take to break even with exceptions slowing the cast down to match regex speeds. About 6 seconds dived by .3 gives us about 20. So if performance matters and you expect less than 1 in 20 of your test to fail then used cast+exceptions.

JRuby 1.7.4 has completely different results:

              user     system      total        real
Using cast best case  2.575000   0.000000   2.575000 (  2.575000)
Using cast worst case 53.260000   0.000000  53.260000 ( 53.260000)
Using cast2 best case  2.375000   0.000000   2.375000 (  2.375000)
Using cast2 worst case 53.822000   0.000000  53.822000 ( 53.822000)
Using regexp short  2.637000   0.000000   2.637000 (  2.637000)
Using regexp long  3.395000   0.000000   3.395000 (  3.396000)
Using regexp short fail  3.072000   0.000000   3.072000 (  3.073000)
Using regexp long fail  3.375000   0.000000   3.375000 (  3.374000)

Cast is only marginally faster in the best case (about 10%). Presuming this difference is appropriate for making generalizations(I do not think it is), then the break even point is somewhere between 200 and 250 runs with only 1 causing an exception.

So exceptions should only be used when truly exceptional things happens, this is decision for you and your codebase. When they aren't used code they are in can be simpler and faster.

If performance doesn't matter, you should probably just following whatever conventions you team or code base already has and ignore this whole answers.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.