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I am needing to iterate over some large arrays and store them in backbone collections from an API call. What is the best way to do this without making the loop cause the interface to become unresponsive?

The return of the ajax request also blocks as the data returned is so large. I figure that I could split it up and use setTimeout to make it run asynchronously in smaller chunks but is there an easier way to do this.

I thought a web worker would be good but it needs to alter some data structures saved on the UI thread. I have tried using this to do the ajax call but when it returns the data to the UI thread there is still a time when the interface is unresponsive.

Thanks in advance

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I ended up using the example proposed by @jfriend00 with a few changes to incorporate different key values and a smaller chunk size due to a more expensive operation –  georgephillips Apr 27 '12 at 5:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You break the processing of the array into chunks and do each chunk on a timer. Usually, you can afford to process more than one on each timer which is both more efficient and faster than only doing one per timer. This code gives the UI thread a chance to process any pending UI events between each chunk which will keep the UI active.

function processLargeArray(array) {
    // set this to whatever number of items you can process at once
    var chunk = 100;
    var index = 0;
    function doChunk() {
        var cnt = chunk;
        while (cnt-- && index < array.length) {
            // process array[index] here
            ++index;
        }
        if (index < array.length) {
            // set Timeout for async iteration
            setTimeout(doChunk, 1);
        }
    }    
    doChunk();    
}

processLargeArray(veryLargeArray);

Here's a working example of the concept - not this same function, but a different long running process that uses the same setTimeout() idea to test out a probability scenario with a lot of iterations: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/9hCVq/


You can make the above into a more generic version that calls a callback function like .forEach() does like this:

// last two args are optional
function processLargeArrayAsync(array, fn, chunk, context) {
    context = context || window;
    chunk = chunk || 100;
    var index = 0;
    function doChunk() {
        var cnt = chunk;
        while (cnt-- && index < array.length) {
            // callback called with args (value, index, array)
            fn.call(context, array[index], index, array);
            ++index;
        }
        if (index < array.length) {
            // set Timeout for async iteration
            setTimeout(doChunk, 1);
        }
    }    
    doChunk();    
}

processLargeArrayAsync(veryLargeArray, myCallback, 100);

Rather than guessing how many to chunk at once, it's also possible to let elapsed time be the guide for each chunk and to let it process as many as it can in a given time interval. This somewhat automatically guarantees browser responsiveness regardless of how CPU intensive the iteration is. So, rather than passing in a chunk size, you can pass in a millisecond value (or just use an intelligent default):

// last two args are optional
function processLargeArrayAsync(array, fn, maxTimePerChunk, context) {
    context = context || window;
    maxTimePerChunk = maxTimePerChunk || 200;
    var index = 0;

    function now() {
        return new Date().getTime();
    }

    function doChunk() {
        var startTime = now();
        while (index < array.length && (now() - startTime) <= maxTimePerChunk) {
            // callback called with args (value, index, array)
            fn.call(context, array[index], index, array);
            ++index;
        }
        if (index < array.length) {
            // set Timeout for async iteration
            setTimeout(doChunk, 1);
        }
    }    
    doChunk();    
}

processLargeArrayAsync(veryLargeArray, myCallback);
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Added a more general purpose version that works via a .forEach() style callback so the same utility function can be used for many purposes. –  jfriend00 Jul 15 at 21:26
    
Added another general purpose version that chunks by time instead of quantity so it will adapt its own chunk size based on how long the iteration takes (keeps the browser responsive). –  jfriend00 Jul 15 at 22:04

Here's a demo of doing this "async" loop. it "delays" iteration for 1ms and within that delay, it gives the UI a chance to do something.

function asyncLoop(arr, callback) {
    (function loop(i) {

        //do stuff here

        if (i < arr.Length) {                      //the condition
            setTimeout(function() {loop(++i)}, 1); //rerun when condition is true
        } else { 
            callback();                            //callback when the loop ends
        }
    }(0));                                         //start with 0
}

asyncLoop(yourArray, function() {
    //do after loop  
})​;

//anything down here runs while the loop runs

There are alternatives like web workers and the currently proposed setImmediate which afaik, is on IE, with a prefix.

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Not as good as previous answer, because it call setTimeout after every element. –  Andrey M. Apr 27 '12 at 4:39

I agree to thinking smaller chunks + setTimeout() together is the way to go.

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