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I have following XML stored in a XML column (called Roles) in a SQL Server database.

<root>
   <role>Alpha</role>
   <role>Beta</role>
   <role>Gamma</role>
</root>

I'd like to list all rows that have a specific role in them. This role passed by parameter.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 44 down vote accepted
select
  Roles
from
  MyTable
where
  Roles.value('(/root/role)[1]', 'varchar(max)') like 'StringToSearchFor'

These pages will show you more about how to query XML in T-SQL:

Querying XML fields using t-sql

Flattening XML Data in SQL Server

EDIT

After playing with it a little bit more, I ended up with this amazing query that uses CROSS APPLY. This one will search every row (role) for the value you put in your like expression...

Given this table structure:

create table MyTable (Roles XML)

insert into MyTable values
('<root>
   <role>Alpha</role>
   <role>Gamma</role>
   <role>Beta</role>
</root>')

We can query it like this:

select * from 

(select 
       pref.value('(text())[1]', 'varchar(32)') as RoleName
from 
       MyTable CROSS APPLY

       Roles.nodes('/root/role') AS Roles(pref)
)  as Result

where RoleName like '%ga%'

You can check the SQL Fiddle here: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/ae0d5/13

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1  
It answers all my question, what does [1] do in your answer? –  Bistro Apr 27 '12 at 4:12
1  
Great answer, I vote for this one, but string should be varchar I guess –  BobSort Apr 27 '12 at 4:13
4  
@Bistro Asking about [1] was a really good question. It means that you pick the first role value from the XML and that means that this will only work for finding Alpha in your sample xml. It will not find the row if you search for Beta. –  Mikael Eriksson Apr 27 '12 at 5:37
1  
In my case, I had to query nodes with specific attribute value. This answer was the lead to my solution. I just had to put double quotes around the attribute value. –  John N Jan 20 at 18:31
declare @T table(Roles xml)

insert into @T values
('<root>
   <role>Alpha</role>
   <role>Beta</role>
   <role>Gamma</role>
</root>')

declare @Role varchar(10)

set @Role = 'Beta'

select Roles
from @T
where Roles.exist('/root/role/text()[. = sql:variable("@Role")]') = 1

If you want the query to work as where col like '%Beta%' you can use contains

declare @T table(Roles xml)

insert into @T values
('<root>
   <role>Alpha</role>
   <role>Beta</role>
   <role>Gamma</role>
</root>')

declare @Role varchar(10)

set @Role = 'et'

select Roles
from @T
where Roles.exist('/root/role/text()[contains(., sql:variable("@Role"))]') = 1
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1  
better answer as it's using the exist clause which should be more lightweight. –  mbourgon May 23 at 15:36

if your field name is Roles and table name is table1 you can use following to search

DECLARE @Role varchar(50);
SELECT * FROM table1
WHERE Roles.exist ('/root/role = sql:variable("@Role")') = 1
share|improve this answer
    
this is good, is here any way to search the using like? forexample /root/role like .... –  Bistro Apr 27 '12 at 4:06
2  
use .value('(/root/role)[1]', 'varchar(max)') like '%yourtext%' instead of exists as Leniel explained –  BobSort Apr 27 '12 at 4:16
2  
Have you tried this? It finds everything, regardless of what you put in @Role. –  Mikael Eriksson Apr 27 '12 at 5:40

I used the below statement to retrieve the values in the XML in the Sql table

with xmlnamespaces(default 'http://test.com/2008/06/23/HL.OnlineContract.ValueObjects')
select * from (
select
            OnlineContractID,
            DistributorID,
            SponsorID,
    [RequestXML].value(N'/OnlineContractDS[1]/Properties[1]/Name[1]', 'nvarchar(30)') as [Name]
   ,[RequestXML].value(N'/OnlineContractDS[1]/Properties[1]/Value[1]', 'nvarchar(30)') as [Value]
     ,[RequestXML].value(N'/OnlineContractDS[1]/Locale[1]', 'nvarchar(30)') as [Locale]
from [OnlineContract]) as olc
where olc.Name like '%EMAIL%' and olc.Value like '%EMAIL%' and olc.Locale='UK EN'
share|improve this answer
    
Using default option makes the XPath queries more readable - thanks for sharing! –  SliverNinja Jun 18 at 13:44

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