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I am getting an error when calling entities.savechanges() on my EF 4.3.1. My database is a sql ce v4 store and I am coding in the mvvm pattern. I have a local version of my context that I send to an observable collection and modify etc. This works fine, and when I call savechanges() when no rows exist in the database the objects persist fine. When I reload the application, the objects are populated in my listbox as they should, however if I add another object and call savechanges() I get an error saying that a duplicate value cannot be inserted into a unique index.

From my understanding it means that the context is trying to save my entities to the datastore, but it seems to be adding my untouched original objects as well as the new one. I thought it would leave them alone, since their state is unchanged.

private void Load()
    {
        entities.Properties.Include("Images").Load();
        PropertyList = new ObservableCollection<Property>();
        PropertyList = entities.Properties.Local;        

        //Sort the list (based on previous session stored in database)
        var sortList = PropertyList.OrderBy(x => x.Sort).ToList();
        PropertyList.Clear();
        sortList.ForEach(PropertyList.Add);

        propertyView = CollectionViewSource.GetDefaultView(PropertyList);
        if (propertyView != null) propertyView.CurrentChanged += new System.EventHandler(propertyView_CurrentChanged);     


        private void NewProperty()
    {
        try
        {
            if (PropertyList != null)
            {                                             
                Property p = new Property()
                    {
                        ID = Guid.NewGuid(),
                        AgentName = "Firstname Lastname",
                        Address = "00 Blank Street",
                        AuctioneerName = "Firstname Lastname",
                        SaleTitle = "Insert a sales title",
                        Price = 0,
                        NextBid = 0,
                        CurrentImage = null,
                        Status = "Auction Pending",
                        QuadVis = false,
                        StatVis = false, //Pause button visibility
                        Sort = PropertyList.Count + 1,                            
                    };

                PropertyList.Add(p);
                SaveProperties();
            }

        private void SaveProperties()
    {
        try
        {               
            foreach (var image in entities.Images.Local.ToList())
            {
                if (image.Property == null)
                    entities.Images.Remove(image);
            }                
        }

        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            System.Windows.MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }

        entities.SaveChanges();
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without commenting on all the code here this is the bit that's causing the specific problem you bring up:

//Sort the list (based on previous session stored in database) 
var sortList = PropertyList.OrderBy(x => x.Sort).ToList(); 
PropertyList.Clear(); 
sortList.ForEach(PropertyList.Add); 

This code:

  • Starts with entities that have been queried and are being tracked by the context as Unchanged entities. That is, entities that are known to already exist in the database.
  • Creates a new sorted list of these entities.
  • Calls Clear on the local collection causing each tracked entity to be marked as deleted and removed from the collection.
  • Adds each entity back to the context putting it now in an Added state meaning that it is new and will be saved to the database when SaveChanges is called,

So effectively you have told EF that all the entities that exist in the database actually don't exist and need to be saved. So it tries to do this and it results in the exception you see.

To fix this don't clear the DbContext local collection and add entities back. Instead you should sort in the view using the local collection to back the view.

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Why didn't I see this! Talk about needing a fresh set of eyes, will give it a shot when I get back this afternooon. –  Jeremy Apr 27 '12 at 20:56

It sounds like you're adding the existing entities to the context (which marks them for insertion) instead of attaching them (which marks them as existing, unmodified).

I'm also not sure that new Guid() isn't returning the same guid... I always use Guid.NewGuid() http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.guid.newguid.aspx

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Guid's are fine. From the objects that have saved to the database, I can see they all have unique guids. I don't fully understand how to use the attachting feature, probably because I never thought I would need to use it. I thought that the idea of the dbset.local was to be able to create a local version of the context so that I can work with an observable collection. The local should sync with the context whenever something is added/removed. When I call save changes, the context should sync with the database. Is this idea correct? Why shouldn't the context include existing objects in the db? –  Jeremy Apr 27 '12 at 5:58
    
I think for the most part you're correct. When you create a context, it essentially becomes a growing in-memory representation of the entities that you load through it from the db (attached) and entities that you add to it (added). It also tracks changes to those entities (modified) and remembers entities you've removed from the context (removed). Calling SaveChanges() causes the context to then reflect it's representation of the entities back to the database - (attached = ignored, added = insert, modified = update, removed = delete) –  Kroehre Apr 27 '12 at 6:17
    
Just makes me think that this implementation is going to shoot the memory through the roof of my application. Maybe I am better off just working on a local copy for the duration of the entire app, then once I am ready to quit and save, I can clear the entire database and load it with objects. To be honest, I am not that impressed with Microsoft - they really don't make the EF or WPF seem that attractive. –  Jeremy Apr 27 '12 at 7:01
1  
I had memory issues with Entity Framework until I really came to understood how it works. I would suggest using a singleton - pre request for asp and globally for winforms. Another thing I would suggest is using .AsNoTracking() when you're loading entities you know you won't be changing. –  Kroehre Apr 27 '12 at 20:23

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