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I know how to do it in code, but can this be done in XAML ?

Window1.xaml:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
    <Grid>
        <ComboBox Name="ComboBox1" HorizontalAlignment="Left" VerticalAlignment="Top">
            <ComboBoxItem>ComboBoxItem1</ComboBoxItem>
            <ComboBoxItem>ComboBoxItem2</ComboBoxItem>
        </ComboBox>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Window1.xaml.cs:

using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;

namespace WpfApplication1
{
    public partial class Window1 : Window
    {
        public Window1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            double width = 0;
            foreach (ComboBoxItem item in ComboBox1.Items)
            {
                item.Measure(new Size(
                    double.PositiveInfinity, double.PositiveInfinity));
                if (item.DesiredSize.Width > width)
                    width = item.DesiredSize.Width;
            }
            ComboBox1.Measure(new Size(
                double.PositiveInfinity, double.PositiveInfinity));
            ComboBox1.Width = ComboBox1.DesiredSize.Width + width;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Check out another post on the similar lines at stackoverflow.com/questions/826985/… Please mark your question as "answered" if this answers your question. –  Sudeep Jun 23 '09 at 19:36
    
I have tried this approach in code as well but found that the measurement can vary between Vista and XP. On Vista, DesiredSize usually includes the drop down arrow size but on XP, often the width does not include the drop-down arrow. Now, my results may be because I'm attempting to do the measurement before the parent window is visible. Adding an UpdateLayout() before the Measure can help but can cause other side-effects in the app. I'd be interested in seeing the solution you come up with if you are willing to share. –  jschroedl Aug 9 '09 at 17:08
    
How did you resolve your issue? –  Andrew Kalashnikov Oct 25 '10 at 16:51

11 Answers 11

up vote 20 down vote accepted

This can't be in XAML without either:

  • Creating a hidden control (Alan Hunford's answer)
  • Changing the ControlTemplate drastically. Even in this case, a hidden version of an ItemsPresenter may need to be created.

The reason for this is that the default ComboBox ControlTemplates that I've come across (Aero, Luna, etc.) all nest the ItemsPresenter in a Popup. This means that the layout of these items is deferred until they are actually made visible.

An easy way to test this is to modify the default ControlTemplate to bind the MinWidth of the outermost container (it's a Grid for both Aero and Luna) to the ActualWidth of PART_Popup. You'll be able to have the ComboBox automatically synchronize it's width when you click the drop button, but not before.

So unless you can force a Measure operation in the layout system (which you can do by adding a second control), I don't think it can be done.

As always, I'm open to an short, elegant solution -- but in this case a code-behind or dual-control/ControlTemplate hacks are the only solutions I have seen.

share|improve this answer

You can't do it directly in Xaml but you can use this Attached Behavior. (The Width will be visible in the Designer)

<ComboBox behaviors:ComboBoxWidthFromItemsBehavior.ComboBoxWidthFromItems="True">
    <ComboBoxItem Content="Short"/>
    <ComboBoxItem Content="Medium Long"/>
    <ComboBoxItem Content="Min"/>
</ComboBox>

The Attached Behavior ComboBoxWidthFromItemsProperty

public static class ComboBoxWidthFromItemsBehavior
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ComboBoxWidthFromItemsProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached
        (
            "ComboBoxWidthFromItems",
            typeof(bool),
            typeof(ComboBoxWidthFromItemsBehavior),
            new UIPropertyMetadata(false, OnComboBoxWidthFromItemsPropertyChanged)
        );
    public static bool GetComboBoxWidthFromItems(DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return (bool)obj.GetValue(ComboBoxWidthFromItemsProperty);
    }
    public static void SetComboBoxWidthFromItems(DependencyObject obj, bool value)
    {
        obj.SetValue(ComboBoxWidthFromItemsProperty, value);
    }
    private static void OnComboBoxWidthFromItemsPropertyChanged(DependencyObject dpo,
                                                                DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        ComboBox comboBox = dpo as ComboBox;
        if (comboBox != null)
        {
            if ((bool)e.NewValue == true)
            {
                comboBox.Loaded += OnComboBoxLoaded;
            }
            else
            {
                comboBox.Loaded -= OnComboBoxLoaded;
            }
        }
    }
    private static void OnComboBoxLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        ComboBox comboBox = sender as ComboBox;
        Action action = () => { comboBox.SetWidthFromItems(); };
        comboBox.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(action, DispatcherPriority.ContextIdle);
    }
}

What it does is that it calls an extension method for ComboBox called SetWidthFromItems which (invisibly) expands and collapses itself and then calculates the Width based on the generated ComboBoxItems. (IExpandCollapseProvider requires a reference to UIAutomationProvider.dll)

Then extension method SetWidthFromItems

public static class ComboBoxExtensionMethods
{
    public static void SetWidthFromItems(this ComboBox comboBox)
    {
        double comboBoxWidth = 19;// comboBox.DesiredSize.Width;

        // Create the peer and provider to expand the comboBox in code behind. 
        ComboBoxAutomationPeer peer = new ComboBoxAutomationPeer(comboBox);
        IExpandCollapseProvider provider = (IExpandCollapseProvider)peer.GetPattern(PatternInterface.ExpandCollapse);
        EventHandler eventHandler = null;
        eventHandler = new EventHandler(delegate
        {
            if (comboBox.IsDropDownOpen &&
                comboBox.ItemContainerGenerator.Status == GeneratorStatus.ContainersGenerated)
            {
                double width = 0;
                foreach (var item in comboBox.Items)
                {
                    ComboBoxItem comboBoxItem = comboBox.ItemContainerGenerator.ContainerFromItem(item) as ComboBoxItem;
                    comboBoxItem.Measure(new Size(double.PositiveInfinity, double.PositiveInfinity));
                    if (comboBoxItem.DesiredSize.Width > width)
                    {
                        width = comboBoxItem.DesiredSize.Width;
                    }
                }
                comboBox.Width = comboBoxWidth + width;
                // Remove the event handler. 
                comboBox.ItemContainerGenerator.StatusChanged -= eventHandler;
                comboBox.DropDownOpened -= eventHandler;
                provider.Collapse();
            }
        });
        comboBox.ItemContainerGenerator.StatusChanged += eventHandler;
        comboBox.DropDownOpened += eventHandler;
        // Expand the comboBox to generate all its ComboBoxItem's. 
        provider.Expand();
    }
}

This extension method also provides to ability to call

comboBox.SetWidthFromItems();

in code behind (e.g in the ComboBox.Loaded event)

share|improve this answer
    
Good solution, thanks. –  Alex Paven Jan 11 '11 at 8:45
    
+1, great solution! I was trying to do something along the same lines, but eventually I used your implementation (with a few modifications) –  Thomas Levesque May 17 '11 at 15:20
    
Amazing thanks. This should be marked as the accepted answer. Looks like attached properties are always the way to everything :) –  Ignacio Soler Garcia Mar 13 '12 at 19:46
    
Best solution as far as I am concerned. I tried multiple tricks from all around the Internet, and your solution is the best and easiest one I found. +1. –  paercebal Jun 14 '12 at 13:44
4  
Note that if you have multiple comboboxes in the same window (it happened for me with a window creating the comboboxes and their content with code-behind), the popups can become visible for a second. I guess this is because multiple "open popup" messages are posted before any "close popup" is called. The solution for that is to make the whole method SetWidthFromItems asynchronous my using an action/delegate and a BeginInvoke with an Idle priority (as done in the Loaded event). This way, no measure will be done while the messge pump is not empty, and thus, no message interleaving will occur –  paercebal Jun 18 '12 at 14:36

Yeah, this one is a bit nasty.

What I've done in the past is to add into the ControlTemplate a hidden listbox (with its itemscontainerpanel set to a grid) showing every item at the same time but with their visibility set to hidden.

I'd be pleased to hear of any better ideas that don't rely on horrible code-behind or your view having to understand that it needs to use a different control to provide the width to support the visuals (yuck!).

share|improve this answer
    
Will this approach size the combo wide enough so that the widest item is fully visible when it's the selected item? This is where I've seen problems. –  jschroedl Aug 9 '09 at 17:11
7  
Could you show your code. –  Andrew Kalashnikov Oct 26 '10 at 15:00

Based on the other answers above, here's my version:

<Grid HorizontalAlignment="Left">
    <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding EnumValues}" Height="0" Margin="15,0"/>
    <ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding EnumValues}" />
</Grid>

HorizontalAlignment="Left" stops the controls using the full width of the containing control. Height="0" hides the items control.
Margin="15,0" allows for additional chrome around combo-box items (not chrome agnostic I'm afraid).

share|improve this answer

I ended up with a "good enough" solution to this problem being to make the combo box never shrink below the largest size it held, similar to the old WinForms AutoSizeMode=GrowOnly.

The way I did this was with a custom value converter:

public class GrowConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public double Minimum
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var dvalue = (double)value;
        if (dvalue > Minimum)
            Minimum = dvalue;
        else if (dvalue < Minimum)
            dvalue = Minimum;
        return dvalue;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }
}

Then I configure the combo box in XAML like so:

 <Whatever>
        <Whatever.Resources>
            <my:GrowConverter x:Key="grow" />
        </Whatever.Resources>
        ...
        <ComboBox MinWidth="{Binding ActualWidth,RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},Converter={StaticResource grow}}" />
    </Whatever>

Note that with this you need a separate instance of the GrowConverter for each combo box, unless of course you want a set of them to size together, similar to the Grid's SharedSizeScope feature.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but only “stable” after having selected the longest entry. –  primfaktor Jun 29 '12 at 6:44
1  
Correct. I had done something about this in WinForms, where I would use the text APIs to measure all the strings in the combo box, and set the min width to account for that. Doing the same is considerably more difficult in WPF, especially when your items are not strings and/or are coming from a binding. –  Cheetah Jul 20 '12 at 20:25

A follow up to Maleak's answer: I liked that implementation so much, I wrote an actual Behavior for it. Obviously you'll need the Blend SDK so you can reference System.Windows.Interactivity.

XAML:

    <ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding ListOfStuff}">
        <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
            <local:ComboBoxWidthBehavior />
        </i:Interaction.Behaviors>
    </ComboBox>

Code:

using System;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Automation.Peers;
using System.Windows.Automation.Provider;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Controls.Primitives;
using System.Windows.Interactivity;

namespace MyLibrary
{
    public class ComboBoxWidthBehavior : Behavior<ComboBox>
    {
        protected override void OnAttached()
        {
            base.OnAttached();
            AssociatedObject.Loaded += OnLoaded;
        }

        protected override void OnDetaching()
        {
            base.OnDetaching();
            AssociatedObject.Loaded -= OnLoaded;
        }

        private void OnLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            var desiredWidth = AssociatedObject.DesiredSize.Width;

            // Create the peer and provider to expand the comboBox in code behind. 
            var peer = new ComboBoxAutomationPeer(AssociatedObject);
            var provider = peer.GetPattern(PatternInterface.ExpandCollapse) as IExpandCollapseProvider;
            if (provider == null)
                return;

            EventHandler[] handler = {null};    // array usage prevents access to modified closure
            handler[0] = new EventHandler(delegate
            {
                if (!AssociatedObject.IsDropDownOpen || AssociatedObject.ItemContainerGenerator.Status != GeneratorStatus.ContainersGenerated)
                    return;

                double largestWidth = 0;
                foreach (var item in AssociatedObject.Items)
                {
                    var comboBoxItem = AssociatedObject.ItemContainerGenerator.ContainerFromItem(item) as ComboBoxItem;
                    if (comboBoxItem == null)
                        continue;

                    comboBoxItem.Measure(new Size(double.PositiveInfinity, double.PositiveInfinity));
                    if (comboBoxItem.DesiredSize.Width > largestWidth)
                        largestWidth = comboBoxItem.DesiredSize.Width;
                }

                AssociatedObject.Width = desiredWidth + largestWidth;

                // Remove the event handler.
                AssociatedObject.ItemContainerGenerator.StatusChanged -= handler[0];
                AssociatedObject.DropDownOpened -= handler[0];
                provider.Collapse();
            });

            AssociatedObject.ItemContainerGenerator.StatusChanged += handler[0];
            AssociatedObject.DropDownOpened += handler[0];

            // Expand the comboBox to generate all its ComboBoxItem's. 
            provider.Expand();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can bind the Width any container you wish.

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.Window1"
   xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
   xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
   Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300" x:Name="Window1">
<Grid>
    <ComboBox 
       Name="ComboBox1"
       HorizontalAlignment="Left"
       VerticalAlignment="Top">
       <ComboBox.Width>
          <Binding ElementName="Window1" Path="ActualWidth"/>
       </ComboBox.Width>
          <ComboBoxItem>ComboBoxItem1</ComboBoxItem>
          <ComboBoxItem>ComboBoxItem2</ComboBoxItem>
    </ComboBox>
</Grid>

To get exactly what you are trying to do with the C# you wrote I would look at impmenting an IValueConverter or IMultiValueConverter.

share|improve this answer

Put an listbox containing the same content behind the dropbox. Then enforce correct height with some binding like this:

<Grid>
       <ListBox x:Name="listBox" Height="{Binding ElementName=dropBox, Path=DesiredSize.Height}" /> 
        <ComboBox x:Name="dropBox" />
</Grid>
share|improve this answer

In my case a much simpler way seemed to do the trick, I just used an extra stackPanel to wrap the combobox.

<StackPanel Grid.Row="1" Orientation="Horizontal">
    <ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding ExecutionTimesModeList}" Width="Auto"
        SelectedValuePath="Item" DisplayMemberPath="FriendlyName"
        SelectedValue="{Binding Model.SelectedExecutionTimesMode}" />    
</StackPanel>

(worked in visual studio 2008)

share|improve this answer
    
-1: I tried this and it's not working at all. –  Ignacio Soler Garcia Mar 13 '12 at 19:45

I was looking for the answer myself, when I came across the UpdateLayout() method that every UIElement has.

It's very simple now, thankfully!

Just call ComboBox1.Updatelayout(); after you set or modify the ItemSource.

share|improve this answer

As for me, the solution for expanding ComboBox.Width to the whole column width, was setting the ColumnDefinition width to "*" instead of "Auto":

<Grid>
    <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <ColumnDefinition Width="140" />
        <ColumnDefinition Width="*" />
    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

    <Label Content="List of items"
      Grid.Column="0" Margin="3" />

    <ComboBox
        Grid.Column="1" 
        ItemsSource="{Binding Path=DestinationSubDivisions}"
        SelectedValue="{Binding Path=TransferRequest.DestinationSubDivision}"
        DisplayMemberPath="Name"
        Margin="3" />
</Grid>
share|improve this answer

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