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What is the most idiomatic way to do the following?

def xstr(s):
    if s is None:
        return ''
    else:
        return s

s = xstr(a) + xstr(b)

update: I'm incorporating Tryptich's suggestion to use str(s), which makes this routine work for other types besides strings. I'm awfully impressed by Vinay Sajip's lambda suggestion, but I want to keep my code relatively simple.

def xstr(s):
    if s is None:
        return ''
    else:
        return str(s)
share|improve this question
6  
I like your original syntax. I think it's already quite clear and easy to read. –  GuiSim Jun 23 '09 at 19:44
    
@GuiSim: I might be biased, but my answer reads almost like a normal English sentence... –  SilentGhost Jun 23 '09 at 19:49
1  
"If s is None, then return an empty string; otherwise, return [string of] s." The code from the question reads like a normal English sentence too. –  Roger Pate Jan 2 '10 at 19:37

12 Answers 12

up vote 24 down vote accepted

If you actually want your function to behave like the str() built-in, but return an empty string when the argument is None, do this:

def xstr(s):
    if s is None:
        return ''
    return str(s)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm keeping the else, but thanks for the str(s) tip so multiple types can be handled. nice! –  Mark Harrison Jul 1 '09 at 9:39
    
Or simply xstr = lambda s: '' if s is None else str(s) –  Michael Mior May 21 '13 at 22:39
def xstr(s):
    return '' if s is None else str(s)
share|improve this answer
6  
works on 2.5 for me just fine. –  SilentGhost Jun 23 '09 at 20:14
3  
This syntax was introduced in 2.5; for earlier versions of Python, you can use return s is not None and s or ''. –  Ben Blank Jun 24 '09 at 0:16
8  
I'd turn it around to emphasize the more commen case: return s if s is not None else "" –  Ber Jun 24 '09 at 7:45
4  
@Ber: I would keep it as is, to avoid a double negative. –  Nikhil Chelliah Jun 26 '09 at 7:09
7  
This is a good example of how .. and .. or .. fails and why if-else is preferred. There're two subtle bugs in s is not None and s or ''. –  Roger Pate Jan 2 '10 at 19:31

If you know that the value will always either be a string or None:

xstr = lambda s: s or ""

print xstr("a") + xstr("b") # -> 'ab'
print xstr("a") + xstr(None) # -> 'a'
print xstr(None) + xstr("b") # -> 'b'
print xstr(None) + xstr(None) # -> ''
share|improve this answer
    
by far the most pythonic. Uses the fact that python treats None, an empty list, an empty string, 0, etc as false. Also uses the fact that the or statement returns the first element that is true or the last element given to the or (or groups of ors). Also this uses lambda functions. I would give you +10 but obviously it wont let me. –  Matt Jun 23 '09 at 22:59
4  
This will convert 0 and False (and anything else that evaluates to False when passed to bool()) –  Arkady Jun 24 '09 at 0:12
5  
I don't think it's "by far the most pythonic". It's a common idiom in other languages, and I don't think it's wrong to use it in Python, but conditional expressions where introduced precisely to avoid tricks like this. –  Roberto Bonvallet Jun 24 '09 at 4:44
1  
This makes [], {}, etc. give the same result as None, which isn't desired. xstr(False), in particular, should be "False" instead of "". Abusing lambdas makes for a poor example, use def xstr(s): return s or "" ir you want to keep it all on one line. –  Roger Pate Feb 9 '10 at 20:22
2  
Note that I qualified my answer at the outset with "If you know that the value will always either be a string or None". –  Vinay Sajip Feb 9 '10 at 22:46

return s or '' will work just fine for your stated problem!

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1  
Worth noting that this will give a different result for when s is False or 0 (which isn't the original string question, but the updated one.) –  Oddthinking Apr 30 '10 at 1:42
def xstr(s):
   return s or ""
share|improve this answer

Probably the shortest would be str(s or '')

Because None is False, and "x or y" returns y if x is false. See Boolean Operators for a detailed explanation. It's short, but not very explicit.

share|improve this answer
    
this is so great, thank you! Never thought of using or this way –  user25064 Jul 11 at 19:32
def xstr(s):
    return {None:''}.get(s, s)
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I think, it is rather pythonic -- how about this one: "xstr = lambda s : {None:''}.get(s,s)" -- reduces the whole thing to a one-liner. –  Juergen Jun 23 '09 at 19:36
12  
Unnecessarily slow (extra dict construction and lookup), and harder to read. Pretty unpythonic. –  Triptych Jun 23 '09 at 19:37
    
You're right. It's rather perlish but it avoids a conditional jump in python bytecode. –  tobidope Jun 23 '09 at 19:40
3  
The get() function call implies at least one additional conditional jump. –  Triptych Jun 23 '09 at 19:45
1  
I wouln't be able to say what this should do without knowing the question or looking up get. –  Dario Jun 23 '09 at 19:46

Functional way (one-liner)

xstr = lambda s: '' if s is None else s
share|improve this answer
    
"def xstr(s): return '' if s is None else s " is an on-liner too, python is not as strict with whitespaces after all –  SilentGhost Jun 23 '09 at 19:35
1  
It's no real one-liner, it's just written in one line g –  Dario Jun 23 '09 at 19:42
1  
in what sense it's not a real onliner? check in your interpreter - it's not a syntax error. for all intents and purposes it's way real than lambda ^_^ –  SilentGhost Jun 23 '09 at 19:47
    
PEP 8 species that you should use def instead of assigning lambda to a variable. The only real advantage of lambda is that you can write as a part of expression(passing to another function for instance) and that advantage is lost in code like this. I used to do this too, until I noticed that def can be written in one line, and then PEP 8 showed me the way to go. ALWAYS follow the python gods. –  Sabyasachi Feb 26 at 14:39

Variation on the above if you need to be compatible with Python 2.4

xstr = lambda s: s is not None and s or ''
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I use max function:

max(None, '')  #Returns blank
max("Hello",'') #Returns Hello

Works like a charm ;) Just put your string in the first parameter of the function.

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1  
This works because 'str' > 'NoneType', and is CPython specific. From the manual: "Objects of different types except numbers are ordered by their type names". Also, this won't work in Python 3000, since inter-type comparison is no longer allowed (TypeError: unorderable types: str() > NoneType()). See How does Python compare string and int? –  plok Jun 30 at 7:50
    
Good to know thanks, so not a good idea moving forward with python 3.x compatible code. –  radtek Jul 4 at 13:25
def xstr(s):
    return s if s else ''

s = "%s%s" % (xstr(a), xstr(b))
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4  
This will return an empty string for all false-like values, which is not what the poster asked for. –  Triptych Jun 23 '09 at 19:29

Use short circuit evaluation:

s = a or '' + b or ''

Since + is not a very good operation on strings, better use format strings:

s = "%s%s" % (a or '', b or '')
share|improve this answer
1  
ever heard of DRY? –  SilentGhost Jun 23 '09 at 19:38
1  
This also will convert 'a' to empty strings for all false-like values, not just None. For instance, empty tuples, lists, and dicts will convert to empty strings, which is not what the OP specified. –  Triptych Jun 23 '09 at 19:41
    
+ is a perfectly good operator for two strings. It's when you try to use it to join dozens that you have trouble. For two, it'll probably be faster than other options; either way, it's in the noise. –  kquinn Jun 23 '09 at 22:10

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