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I have a relation e.g. R(Owner,Car). How can I return the owners who hold three cars in relational algebra? (and without using aggregate functions)

e.g. something like σ(COUNT(Car)=3)(R) but without using aggregate functions?

e.g.
given            return
+-+----+         +-+----+
|a|attX|         |a|attX|
+-+----+         +-+----+
|a|attY|   ==>   |a|attY|
+-+----+         +-+----+
|a|attZ|         |a|attZ|
+-+----+         +-+----+
|b|attX|
+-+----+
|c|attW|
+-+----+
|c|attX|
+-+----+
|c|attY|
+-+----+
|c|attZ|
+-+----+

Edit: Thanks for your answers, but I am looking for how to write this in relational algebra. This means in the form using operators like σ, π, X, , and so on.

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"without using aggregate functions" -- is that a stated requirement? Homework? –  onedaywhen Apr 27 '12 at 7:45
    
Yes, and yes. I have attempted this myself to no avail. –  noted Apr 27 '12 at 8:59

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Here's one way of doing it, in SQL using operators that are easy to translate to relational algebra, and using slightly different test data (different types, same names):

WITH R 
     AS
     (
      SELECT * 
        FROM (
              VALUES (1, 1), 
                     (2, 2), (2, 3),
                     (3, 1), (3, 2), (3, 3),
                     (4, 1), (4, 2), (4, 3), (4, 4)
             ) AS T (Owner, Car)
     ),
     OwnersWithAtLeastThreeCars
     AS
     (
      SELECT DISTINCT R1.Owner
        FROM R AS R1, R AS R2, R AS R3
       WHERE R1.Owner = R2.Owner
             AND R2.Owner = R3.Owner
             AND R1.Car <> R2.Car
             AND R1.Car <> R3.Car
             AND R2.Car <> R3.Car
     ),
     OwnersWithAtLeastFourCars
     AS
     (
      SELECT DISTINCT R1.Owner
        FROM R AS R1, R AS R2, R AS R3, R AS R4
       WHERE R1.Owner = R2.Owner
             AND R2.Owner = R3.Owner
             AND R3.Owner = R4.Owner
             AND R1.Car <> R2.Car
             AND R1.Car <> R3.Car
             AND R1.Car <> R4.Car
             AND R2.Car <> R3.Car
             AND R2.Car <> R4.Car
             AND R3.Car <> R4.Car
     )
SELECT * FROM OwnersWithAtLeastThreeCars
EXCEPT       
SELECT * FROM OwnersWithAtLeastFourCars;

p.s. I'm using 'old style' (i.e. pre-1992) standard SQL joins, which are widely condemned on Stackoverflow. I'm using them not only because it fits with the OP's list of available operators but, frankly, in these circumstances I find them much easier to write than using infix INNER JOIN notation.

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Perfect answer in SQL. I managed to solve this myself and your answer corresponds nicely. –  noted Apr 27 '12 at 19:26

you said σ(COUNT(Car)=3)(R), but COUNT is an aggregation function.

without aggregations, the only way I see is loop through the R table rows by row counting Owner. Something like:

for each row
    If owner=previous_owner then n_cars++ 
    else (if n_cars>=3 then return owner
end
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\pi_{Car.owner}(\sigma_{Car.owner = C1.owner\wedge 
                        C1.owner = C2.owner\wedge 
                        Car.vin != C1.vin\wedge 
                        C1.vin != C2.vin\wedge 
                        Car.vin != C2.vin}(Car x 
                                           \rho_{C1}(Car) x 
                                           \rho_{C2}(Car)))
 -
 \pi_{Car.owner}(\sigma_{Car.owner = C1.owner\wedge 
                        C1.owner = C2.owner\wedge 
                        C2.owner = C3.owner \wedge
                        Car.vin != C1.vin\wedge 
                        C1.vin != C2.vin\wedge 
                        Car.vin != C2.vin \wedge
                        Car.vin != C3.vin\wedge 
                        C1.vin != C3.vin\wedge 
                        C2.vin != C3.vin}(Car x 
                                           \rho_{C1}(Car) x 
                                           \rho_{C2}(Car) x
                                           \rho_{C3}(Car)))

where \pi is projection, \sigma is selection, x is cartesian product, \rho is renaming, \wedge represents conjunction and I assume the attributes of relation Car to be called owner and vin.

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