Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given two strings text1 and text2

public SOMEUSABLERETURNTYPE Compare(string text1, string text2)
{
     // DO SOMETHING HERE TO COMPARE
}

Examples:

  1. First String: StackOverflow

    Second String: StaqOverflow

    Return: Similarity is 91%

    The return can be in % or something like that.

  2. First String: The simple text test

    Second String: The complex text test

    Return: The values can be considered equal

Any ideas? What is the best way to do this?

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Gangnus, Porges, tinstaafl, iandotkelly, Chris Cameron Jan 23 at 1:45

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
Why do you think the two strings in example 2 should compare equal? –  Sinan Ünür Jun 23 '09 at 21:01
    
Am I missing something here? Did the original poster give any indication that he was concerned with phonetics, rather than the characters, other than the fact that the first example could be seen to imply phonetic similarity? The second example certainly does not. –  kcrumley Jun 23 '09 at 21:10
    
I guess that "Similarity" and "Phonetic" are closest, but are different things. The "Similarity" validation needs to use a "Phonetic" algorithm and "Similarity" algorithm to validate correctly a text. –  Zanoni Jun 24 '09 at 11:37
    
@kcrumley: The second example is only hypothetical. Strings with some similarity for each found word, can be considered similar. –  Zanoni Jun 24 '09 at 11:40
add comment

12 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

There are various different ways of doing this. Have a look at the Wikipedia "String similarity measures" page for links to other pages with algorithms.

I don't think any of those algorithms take sounds into consideration, however - so "staq overflow" would be as similar to "stack overflow" as "staw overflow" despite the first being more similar in terms of pronunciation.

I've just found another page which gives rather more options... in particular, the Soundex algorithm (Wikipedia) may be closer to what you're after.

share|improve this answer
4  
FYI, if you happen to be working with the data with SQL Server, it has a SOUNDEX() function. –  Paul Draper Apr 2 '13 at 18:45
1  
Also, it should be noted that Soundex is an old algorithm intended mostly for English words. If you want a multi-lingual modern algorithm, consider using Metaphone. This article discusses the differences in greater detail: informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1848528 –  Seanny123 Nov 5 '13 at 1:24
add comment

Levenshtein distance is probably what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
Here is a great example of how to write it, gotta love DotNetPerls. dotnetperls.com/levenshtein –  jamesbar2 Sep 12 '13 at 19:58
add comment

Here is some code I have written for a project I am working on. I need to know the Similarity Ratio of the strings and the Similarity Ratio based on words of the strings. This last one, I want to know both the Words Similarity Ratio of the smallest string(so if all words exist and match in the larger string the result will be 100%) and the Words Similarity Ratio of the larger string(which I call RealWordsRatio). I use the Levenshtein algorithm to find the distance. The code is unoptimised, so far, but it works as expected. I hope you find it useful.

public static int Compute(string s, string t)
    {
        int n = s.Length;
        int m = t.Length;
        int[,] d = new int[n + 1, m + 1];

        // Step 1
        if (n == 0)
        {
            return m;
        }

        if (m == 0)
        {
            return n;
        }

        // Step 2
        for (int i = 0; i <= n; d[i, 0] = i++)
        {
        }

        for (int j = 0; j <= m; d[0, j] = j++)
        {
        }

        // Step 3
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
        {
            //Step 4
            for (int j = 1; j <= m; j++)
            {
                // Step 5
                int cost = (t[j - 1] == s[i - 1]) ? 0 : 1;

                // Step 6
                d[i, j] = Math.Min(
                    Math.Min(d[i - 1, j] + 1, d[i, j - 1] + 1),
                    d[i - 1, j - 1] + cost);
            }
        }
        // Step 7
        return d[n, m];
    }

double GetSimilarityRatio(String FullString1, String FullString2, out double WordsRatio, out double RealWordsRatio)
    {
        double theResult = 0;
        String[] Splitted1 = FullString1.Split(new char[]{' '}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
        String[] Splitted2 = FullString2.Split(new char[]{' '}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
        if (Splitted1.Length < Splitted2.Length)
        {
            String[] Temp = Splitted2;
            Splitted2 = Splitted1;
            Splitted1 = Temp;
        }
        int[,] theScores = new int[Splitted1.Length, Splitted2.Length];//Keep the best scores for each word.0 is the best, 1000 is the starting.
        int[] BestWord = new int[Splitted1.Length];//Index to the best word of Splitted2 for the Splitted1.

        for (int loop = 0; loop < Splitted1.Length; loop++) 
        {
            for (int loop1 = 0; loop1 < Splitted2.Length; loop1++) theScores[loop, loop1] = 1000;
            BestWord[loop] = -1;
        }
        int WordsMatched = 0;
        for (int loop = 0; loop < Splitted1.Length; loop++)
        {
            String String1 = Splitted1[loop];
            for (int loop1 = 0; loop1 < Splitted2.Length; loop1++)
            {
                String String2 = Splitted2[loop1];
                int LevenshteinDistance = Compute(String1, String2);
                theScores[loop, loop1] = LevenshteinDistance;
                if (BestWord[loop] == -1 || theScores[loop, BestWord[loop]] > LevenshteinDistance) BestWord[loop] = loop1;
            }
        }

        for (int loop = 0; loop < Splitted1.Length; loop++)
        {
            if (theScores[loop, BestWord[loop]] == 1000) continue;
            for (int loop1 = loop + 1; loop1 < Splitted1.Length; loop1++)
            {
                if (theScores[loop1, BestWord[loop1]] == 1000) continue;//the worst score available, so there are no more words left
                if (BestWord[loop] == BestWord[loop1])//2 words have the same best word
                {
                    //The first in order has the advantage of keeping the word in equality
                    if (theScores[loop, BestWord[loop]] <= theScores[loop1, BestWord[loop1]])
                    {
                        theScores[loop1, BestWord[loop1]] = 1000;
                        int CurrentBest = -1;
                        int CurrentScore = 1000;
                        for (int loop2 = 0; loop2 < Splitted2.Length; loop2++)
                        {
                            //Find next bestword
                            if (CurrentBest == -1 || CurrentScore > theScores[loop1, loop2])
                            {
                                CurrentBest = loop2;
                                CurrentScore = theScores[loop1, loop2];
                            }
                        }
                        BestWord[loop1] = CurrentBest;
                    }
                    else//the latter has a better score
                    {
                        theScores[loop, BestWord[loop]] = 1000;
                        int CurrentBest = -1;
                        int CurrentScore = 1000;
                        for (int loop2 = 0; loop2 < Splitted2.Length; loop2++)
                        {
                            //Find next bestword
                            if (CurrentBest == -1 || CurrentScore > theScores[loop, loop2])
                            {
                                CurrentBest = loop2;
                                CurrentScore = theScores[loop, loop2];
                            }
                        }
                        BestWord[loop] = CurrentBest;
                    }

                    loop = -1;
                    break;//recalculate all
                }
            }
        }
        for (int loop = 0; loop < Splitted1.Length; loop++)
        {
            if (theScores[loop, BestWord[loop]] == 1000) theResult += Splitted1[loop].Length;//All words without a score for best word are max failures
            else
            {
                theResult += theScores[loop, BestWord[loop]];
                if (theScores[loop, BestWord[loop]] == 0) WordsMatched++;
            }
        }
        int theLength = (FullString1.Replace(" ", "").Length > FullString2.Replace(" ", "").Length) ? FullString1.Replace(" ", "").Length : FullString2.Replace(" ", "").Length;
        if(theResult > theLength) theResult = theLength;
        theResult = (1 - (theResult / theLength)) * 100;
        WordsRatio = ((double)WordsMatched / (double)Splitted2.Length) * 100;
        RealWordsRatio = ((double)WordsMatched / (double)Splitted1.Length) * 100;
        return theResult;
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

I wrote a Double Metaphone implementation in C# a while back. You'll find it vastly superior to Soundex and the like.

Levenshtein distance has also been suggested, and it's a great algorithm for a lot of uses, but phonetic matching is not really what it does; it only seems that way sometimes because phonetically similar words are also usually spelled similarly. I did an analysis of various fuzzy matching algorithms which you might also find useful.

share|improve this answer
add comment

To deal with 'sound alikes' you may want to look into encoding using a phonetic algorithm like Double Metaphone or soundex. I don't know if computing Levenshtein distances on phonetic encoded strings would be beneficial or not, but might be a possibility. Alternately, you could use a heuristic like: convert each word in the string to its encoded form and remove any words that occur in both strings and replace them with a single representation before computing the Levenshtein distance.

share|improve this answer
    
The soundex algorithm is used by the medical community to warn about like sounding surnames. It is included in many standard libraries. –  slypete Jun 23 '09 at 19:59
1  
Metaphone is far superior to Soundex. –  Dour High Arch Jun 23 '09 at 21:13
add comment

You might look for string "distances", for example the Levenshtein distance.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Perl module Text::Phonetic has implementations of various algorithms.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Jeff Atwood wrote about looking for a similar solution for determining the authorship of wiki posts which may help you narrow your search.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're comparing values in a SQL database you can use the SOUNDEX function. If you query Google for SOUNDEX and C#, some people have written a similar function for that and VB.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I have to recommend Soundex too, I have used it in the past to process misspelt city names. Here is a good link for usage: http://whitepapers.zdnet.com/abstract.aspx?docid=352953

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to compare phonetically, check out the Soundex and Metaphone algorithms: http://www.blackbeltcoder.com/Articles/algorithms/phonetic-string-comparison-with-soundex

share|improve this answer
add comment

Metaphone 3 is the third generation of the Metaphone algorithm. It increases the accuracy of phonetic encoding from the 89% of Double Metaphone to 98%, as tested against a database of the most common English words, and names and non-English words familiar in North America. This produces an extremely reliable phonetic encoding for American pronunciations.

Metaphone 3 was designed and developed by Lawrence Philips, who designed and developed the original Metaphone and Double Metaphone algorithms.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.