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Assuming a tab-separated-values file with a header line, how would one create a PHP array with the header fields as the key and the data fields as the data?

Assuming $txtArray contains the all the lines in the file,

    $hdrArray = explode( "\t", $txtArray[0]);
    $i = 0;
    foreach ($hdrArray as $hdr) {
        $heads[$hdr] = '';
        $headerNames[$i++] = $hdr;
    }
    for ($i = 1; $i < (count($txtArray) - 1); $i++ ) {
        $datArray = explode( "\t", $txtArray[$i]);
        if (count($datArray) > 1) {
            for($j = 0; $j < count($datArray); $j++) {
                $heads[$headerNames[$j]] = $datArray[$j];       
            }
        }
        # process the line
    }

I've got $heads containing field_name => field_data for all the fields in each line of the file. Is there a better way to code this?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Apr 27 '12 at 8:32

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

2  
Your code doesn't really work, could you include a sample of the file you're parsing? And since this is a technical issue, it's more suitable for Stack Overflow, unless I'm missing something? –  Yannis Apr 27 '12 at 8:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What qualifies as 'better'?

You could use a regex split to make it a little more robust but if you have control over the source CSV you shouldn't have to worry about dirty data.

One obvious optimization I see is to cache the count() result.

Use:

for ($i = 1, $c=count($txtArray); $i < c - 1); $i++)

Instead of:

for ($i = 1; $i < (count($txtArray) - 1); $i++ )

Every time you call count() it's re-calculating the result. Doing the calculation once should be sufficient so you just save the result.

I don't see why you need:

if (count($datArray) > 1)

If you're working with 'clean' data, it should have a fixed number of values-per-row so counting them and checking for none is unnecessary. To speed things up you could cache the row-length by counting the number of rows in the header.

After:

$hdrArray = explode( "\t", $txtArray[0]);

Do:

$c2 = count($hdrArray);

Then use it in the second for loop:

for($j = 0; $j < c2; $j++)

If you do have to worry about empty rows it would probably be faster to search for an empty line and skip it in the loop.

Like this:

// skip the row if the $datArray contains an empty array
if($datArray == array()) {
    continue;
}
$heads[$headerNames[$j]] = $datArray[$j];       

Altogether you get:

$hdrArray = explode( "\t", $txtArray[0]);
$c2 = count($hdrArray);

// it has an iterator variable...
// I don't understand why you wouldn't use a for loop here
$i = 0;
foreach ($hdrArray as $hdr) {
    $heads[$hdr] = '';
    $headerNames[$i++] = $hdr;
}

for ($i = 1, $c=count($txtArray); $i < c1 - 1); $i++) {
    $datArray = explode( "\t", $txtArray[$i]);
    for($j = 0; $j < c2; $j++)
        // skip the row if the $datArray contains an empty array
        if($datArray == array()) {
            continue;
        }
        $heads[$headerNames[$j]] = $datArray[$j];
    }      
}

I'm assuming your first implementation worked, and the source data is actually CSV (ie fixed number of rows/columns.

All I did was apply some simple (and common) optimizations to cut down on the number of unnecessary calculations. Pretty basic stuff that you get used to seeing after a while.

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Assuming your input file looks like this:

head1 head2 head3
v11   v12   v13
v21   v22   v23
v31   v32   v33

A simpler way to parse it would be:

$hdrArray = explode("\t", $txtArray[0]); 
// array(3) { [0]=> string(5) "head1" [1]=> string(5) "head2" [2]=> string(6) "head3 " }

$length = count($txtArray) - 1; // having count in the for loop means it'll be executed at each iteration
$data   = array();

for($i = 1; $i <= $length; $i++) {
    $datArray = explode("\t", $txtArray[$i]); 
    // array(3) { [0]=> string(3) "v11" [1]=> string(3) "v12" [2]=> string(4) "v13 " }

    foreach($hdrArray as $key => $header) {
        $data[$i - 1][$header] = $datArray[$key]; // $i - 1 to start your $data array from 0
    }   
}

And your $data array would look like:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(3) {
    ["head1"]=>
    string(3) "v11"
    ["head2"]=>
    string(3) "v12"
    ["head3"]=>
    string(4) "v13"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(3) {
    ["head1"]=>
    string(3) "v21"
    ["head2"]=>
    string(3) "v22"
    ["head3"]=>
    string(4) "v23"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(3) {
    ["head1"]=>
    string(3) "v31"
    ["head2"]=>
    string(3) "v32"
    ["head3"]=>
    string(3) "v33"
  }
}

You can skip count altogether, at the cost of an extra iteration:

foreach($txtArray as $i => $value) {
    if($i == 0) continue; // header, move on

    $datArray = explode("\t", $value); 

    foreach($hdrArray as $key => $header) {
        $data[$i - 1][$header] = $datArray[$key];
    }   
}

This might actually be a tad faster than using count, as the first iteration stops immediately and the loop continues to the next. But it really depends on the size of your array, and the gain / loss will probably be insignificant.

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