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I am trying to work out OpenGL ES 2.0 and I am pretty much an OpenGL newbie. I have a simple program that at the moment just draws a red square at the origin and I want to use a matrix to move it from the origin to the centre of the screen. I believe I have done everything correctly so far but I must be missing something as when I apply the matrix to the shader I just get a blank screen.

Shader:

const char vShaderStr[] = "attribute vec4 a_position; \n"
        "attribute vec4 a_colour; \n"
        "varying vec4 v_colour; \n"
        "uniform mat4 u_transformation; \n"
        "void main() \n"
        "{ \n"
        "       v_colour = a_colour; \n"
        "       gl_Position = u_transformation * a_position; \n"
        "} \n";
const char fShaderStr[] = "varying vec4 v_colour; \n"
        "void main() \n"
        "{ \n"
        "       gl_FragColor = v_colour; \n"
        "} \n";

Create matrix and send to shader:

transformationMatrix = glGetUniformLocation(programObject, "u_transformation");
...
GLfloat vMatrix[] = {
        0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f,
        0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f,
        0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f,
        -0.5f, -0.5f, 0.0f, 1.0f,
    };
glUniformMatrix4fv(transformationMatrix, 1, GL_FALSE, vMatrix);

Do I have to do some maths with this matrix before it is sent to the shader? If so how? I feel I am missing something glaringly obvious to most people here.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your matrix is probably wrong. Assuming everything else is set up correctly, this would be the correct matrix:

GLfloat vMatrix[] = {
    1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f,
    0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f,
    0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f,
    -0.5f, -0.5f, 0.0f, 1.0f,
};
share|improve this answer
    
That's brilliant thanks! So you have to start with the identity matrix first and then change the other values around it. –  Adam Pointer Apr 27 '12 at 8:55
    
Yup, otherwise u_transformation * a_position will yield an incorrect value (x=0,y=0,z=0). –  starbugs Apr 27 '12 at 8:57

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