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I have several questions on bidirectional mapping.

I have these entities:

  1. Employee(1) - (1) Parking_Lot
  2. Employee(*) - (1) Department
  3. Employee(*) - (1) Project

  4. What is the source and target entity for the above relationship?

  5. What is the owner for ManyToOne relationship. I wonder the owner is on Many entity or One entity?
  6. Do mappedBy specify on owner side or inverse side?

Please help.

EDIT:

I have the following table: Project - Proj_Client - Client (Many to Many relationship) and persist the project table but the client is not get persist. What wrong with it?

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted
@Entity
@Table(name="empoyee")
public class Employee {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    @Column(name = "id")
    private Integer id;
    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="department_id", referencedColumnName="id")
    private Department department;
    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="project_id", referencedColumnName="id")
    private Project projects;
    @OneToOne(mappedBy="employee")
    private ParkingLot parkingLot;
    //Other properties,constructors, getters and setters and so on
}

@Entity
@Table(name="department")
public class Department implements Serializable {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    @Column(name = "id")
    private Long id;
    @OneToMany(mappedBy="department")
    private List<Employee> employees;
    //Other properties,constructors, getters and setters and so on}
@Entity
@Table(name="parking_lot")
public class ParkingLot implements Serializable {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    @Column(name = "id")
    private Long id;
    @OneToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="employee_id",referencedColumnName="id")
    private Employee employee;
    //Other properties,constructors, getters and setters and so on}
@Entity
@Table(name="project")
public class Project implements Serializable {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    @Column(name = "id")
    private Long id;
    @OneToMany(mappedBy="project")
    private List<Employee> employees;
    //Other properties,constructors, getters and setters and so on
}

If the relationship is unidirectional there really isn't an owning side, and there isn't any mappedBy annotations. If the relationship is bidirectional there is a side with the mappedBy annotation - the other side is the owning side. The owning side is the side that owns the relationship. So the term is not ment to be applied like a ParkingLot owns its Employee or an Employee owns its ParkingLot, but rather like the relationship between ParkingLot and Employee is owned by the Employee (or ParkingLot see below). For ManyToOne there is no mappedBy, so it is always the entity specified under the OneToMany annotation that owns the relationship (makes sense, since the for example the project table can't have foreign keys to all its employees) So for the two ManyToOne/OneToMany mappings in your example we don't have a choice in which side owns the relationship. Between Employee and ParkingLot we have a choice, I choosed ParkingLot. When given a choice, what does it matter? Well, the main difference is that the mappedBy have the porperty cascade. Please note that it doesn't matter which table have the foreign key, or if the relationship is in its own table - JPA supports all cases (@InverseJoinColumn etc).

For bidirectional mappings there isn't a clear target and source for the mapping, it depends on which way you at the mapping from. The term is more applicable to unidirectional mappings, and there the source side is of course the entity with the mapping (that is possible knowledge of the target entity)

4) Not applicable (unless you make the relationship between ParkingLot and Employee unidirectional). 5) The owner of the relationship is always "on the One entity" 6) inverse side

Final note: "owning side" is confusing, for example we could design so that a Department owns its Employees and if we delete a Department all its employees would also be deleted. This would be done by changing @OneToMany(mappedBy="department") into @OneToMany(mappedBy="department", cascade= CascadeType.REMOVE) then it would really make sense to say "the Department entity owns its Employee entities" but the relationship would still be owned by the Employee entity.

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Owning side is confusing because the JPA does the mapping(linking) operation but provider does the sql operation.Question: I have a many to many relationship between Employee and project and all the necessary mapping like joinTable but i do not have the join table class/entity. How to populate the joinTable in this case? –  peterwkc Apr 30 '12 at 6:06
    
How is the cascade affects the owner relationship or JPA mapping and sql operation? –  peterwkc Apr 30 '12 at 6:20
    
There is no need for a seperate class/entity for the JoinTable, as long as it only holds the relationship and not additional data/columns. cascade question: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Java_Persistence/Relationships#Cascading –  esej Apr 30 '12 at 8:04
    
Thanks. I have the following table: Project - Proj_Client - Client (Many to Many relationship) and persist the project table into database but the client is not get persist. What wrong with it? –  peterwkc May 3 '12 at 9:21
    
Could be one very many different things. Maybe that is another stackoverflow question? –  esej May 3 '12 at 10:00

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