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I have decided to have 2 set of images for my iPod game. One with 320x480 and the other for the retina one. I can switch happily between them but this forces me to add extra code to handle the change in resolution.

My game is played in screen space on a grid, so, if I have 32 pixel tiles, I will have to use 32 offsets in low res and 64 in retina (because of doubling resolution). For a simple game this can be no problem, but what about other more complex games? How do you handle this without hardcoding things depending on the target resolution.

Of course an easy way to bypass this is just releasing a 320x480 version an let the hardware upscale, but this is not what I want because of blurry images. I'm a bit lost here.

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2 Answers 2

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If you have to, you can do the conversion from points to pixels (and vice versa), easily by either multiplying or dividing the pixel/point position with the contentScaleFactor of your view. However, normally this is done automatically by you if you just keep it to using points instead of pixels.

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I assume this won't work when executing the iphone app on an ipad because of the aspect ratio change. Am I right? –  Notbad Apr 27 '12 at 10:35
    
Uhm, probably. I would assume that you could "simply" express your UI in % (ex. 20% from the top left) and then do the same for the touch and thus get your result. But idk, that highly depends on what you are doing and how you are doing it and I'm afraid that I'm a total Unity3d noob. –  JustSid Apr 29 '12 at 17:47
    
Thanks anyway . –  Notbad Apr 30 '12 at 22:33

This is automatic. You only need to add image files suffixed '@2x' for the retina resolution. Regarding pixels, from your program you work in points which are translated to pixels by the system. Screen dimensions are 320x480 points for iphone retina and non-retina.

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