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So I have the following project to accomplish. I'm undecided on how to design it though. Would love some advice.

It's basically a table archiver. Givend a certain condition you need to export those rows in another place. This place could be another database or an (s)ftp server. If you choose a database you need to create a table everytime you reach a certain limit (like no more than 50k rows per table), if you choose an (s)ftp server then you need to write a CSV or an XML and put the file there.

So we have these combinations:

  1. sql2CustomerSql
  2. sql2Oursql (for this we already class for connecting and getting some information base on system configuration)
  3. csv2ftp
  4. csv2sftp
  5. xml2ftp
  6. xml2sftp

Now, I see AbstractFactory pattern all over the place but based on what? My thinking is that I should have SQLWriter, XMLWriter, CSVWriter that inherits all from an abstract Writer class that implements some common policy like counting rows, getting common configuration parameters etc... Should I do the same for the Connection class/interface (because sql and (s)ftp are really different?

If you need more information just ask.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sounds like you're on the right road.

You should avoid creating classes that are combinations of the Writer and Connection, but instead create some sort of a Manager class that contains (as attributes) a Writer interface and Connection interface. Then create the appropriate implementations of each and pass them into the Manager.

This is a classic use of the Strategy Design pattern.

Edit: Adding code example. You should add appropriate error checking.

class Writer
{
public:
    virtual void output(cons std::string &data) = 0;
};

class Format
{
public:
    virtual std::string serialize() = 0;
};

// Create concrete Writer and Format classes here

class OutputManager
{
public:
    // Notice there should be no Writer, Format creation logic here,
    // This class should focus on orchestrating the output
    OutputManager() : writer_(NULL), format_(NULL) {}
    OutputManager(Writer *w, Format *f) : writer_(w), format_(f) {}

    void setWriter(Writer *w) { writer_ = w; }
    Writer *getWriter()       { return writer_; }

    void setFormat(Format *f) { format_ = f; }
    Format *getFormat()       { return format_; }

    // Maybe this should have a different return type
    void doOutput()
    {
        // Not sure what else you would need here,
        // but this is an example usage
        writer_->output(format_->serialize());
    }

private:
    Writer *writer_;
    Format *format_;
};

//
// And now the factories
//
class OutputAbstractFactory
{
public:
    OutputAbstractFactory(Config *c) config_(c) {}
    void createFactories()
    {
        writerFactory_ = WriterAbstractFactory::getWriterFactory(config_);
        formatFactory_ = FormatAbstractFactory::getFormatFactory(config_);
    }

    Writer *getWriter() { return writerFactory_->getWriter(); }
    Format *getFormat() { return formatFactory_->getFormat(); }

private:
    WriterAbstractFactory *writerFactory_;
    FormatAbstractFactory *formatFactory_;
    Config *config_;
}

class WriterAbstractFactory
{
public:
    // Config is a class you will have to make with 
    // the info detailing the Writer and Format stuff
    static WriterAbstractFactory *getWriterFactory(Config *c);
    virtual Writer *getWriter() = 0;
};

class FormatAbstractFactory
{
public:
    // Config is a class you will have to make with
    // the info detailing the Writer and Format stuff
    static FormatAbstractFactory *getFormatFactory(Config *c);
    virtual Format *getFormat() = 0;
};

// Create concrete factories here

//
// And this ties it all together
//
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Config c;
    // populate Config accordingly

    OutputAbstractFactory *factory(&c);
    factory.createFactories();

    Writer *w = factory->getWriter();
    Format *f = factory->getFormat();
    // Do whatever else you need to with the Writer/Format here

    OutputManager om(w, f);
    // Do whatever else you need with the OutputManager here
    om.doOutput();
}
share|improve this answer
    
So you say the Manager class should deal with configuration using a strategy pattern, and I should create istances of Writers and Connections via AbstractFactory? – dierre Apr 27 '12 at 13:21
    
I think I can explain it better in the code I just added :) But basically we're using a Strategy pattern to avoid mixing classes, and an AbstractFactory for Writer/Format creation logic. The OutputManager might be overkill, it just depends on what else you need to do with the Writer and Formats. – Brady Apr 27 '12 at 15:16
    
I'm guessing you meant Writer/Connection :) Thank you, really interesting. – dierre Apr 27 '12 at 19:37
    
I decided to go with yours. I made some small changes for the Connection part because I needed to use something already in place and they don't have common interfaces. Basicalley I went for a java.sql.connection for the SQLWriter and I went for a "Transport" interface (it's the interface already used for FTP,SFTP,FTPS etc...) for the other two Writers. Basically the instantiation is one level below yours. – dierre Apr 30 '12 at 15:36

You might want to get hold of a copy of Modern C++ Design to get ideas on how to make a policy-based generic conversion tool. Below a very sketchy skeleton that is parameterized on two policies: the Format and the Connection.

template
<
    typename FormatPolicy,    // SQL, XML, CSV, provides row, config functionality
    typename ConnectionPolicy // SQL, FTP, provides open/close/read/write functionality
>
class ConversionTool
: 
    public FormatPolicy,
    public ConnectionPolicy
{
public:
    // your conversion interface here
    void operator()( /* your input */, /* your output */);
};

class SQLFormat { // SQL specific stuff } ;
class SQLConnection { // SQL specific stuff };

typedef ConversionTool<SQLFormat, SQLConnection> SQL2OurCustomerSQL;
SQL2OurCustomerSQL()(in_file, out_file); // for elsewhere declared in_file / out_file
share|improve this answer
    
I would try to avoid multiple inheritance like you have in ConversionTool. The Strategy pattern basically talks about using 'HAS-A' relationships instead of 'IS-A' relationships. – Brady Apr 27 '12 at 15:18
    
This is purely multiple inheritance of interface, the type parameters of ConnectionTool cover orthogonal directions of customization, and they are typically stateless, so there are no issues of diamond-graph etc. Again see Modern C++ for the explanations. – TemplateRex Apr 27 '12 at 18:15

You are dealing with two issues. One is format and another is destination for persisting. For format you need serializer, for destination you need adapter. SqlSerializer, XMLserializer. SQLDestination, FTPDestination atc.

Pseudo code would look like:

  • Destination.persist(new Serializer(SourceData));
  • Destination.persist(Serializer.transform(SourceData));
  • new Destination(new Serializer(SourceData)).persist();

    interface DataSerializer{
        String serialize();
    }
    
    class SqlSerializer implements DataSerializer {
        final Object rawData;
    
        SqlSerializer(Object rawData) {
            this.rawData = rawData;
        }
    
        String serialize() {
            // SQL Serialization Logic
        }
    }
    
    class XmlSerializer implements DataSerializer {
        final Object rawData;
    
        XmlSerializer(Object rawData) {
           this.rawData = rawData;
        }
    
        String serialize() {
            // XML Serialization Logic
        }
    }
    
    interface Destination {
        void persist(DataSerializer dataSerializer);
    }
    
    class SqlDestination implements Destination {
        final String username;
        ...
        ...
    
        SqlDestination(String username, String password, String url) {
            this.username = username;
            ...
            ...
        }
    
        void persist(DataSerializer dataSerializer) {
            // open SQL connection
            String = dataSerialize.serialize();
            // do sqlPersistanceLogic
        }
    }
    
    class FtpDestination implements Destination {
        final String username;
        ...
        ...
    
        FtpDestination(String username, String password, String url) {
            this.username = username;
            ...
            ...
        }
    
        void persist(DataSerializer dataSerializer) {
            // open FTP session connection
            String = dataSerialize.serialize();
            // send to ftpDestination
        }
    }
    
    Call:
    
    Destination dest = getApropriateDestination();
    dest.persist(new XmlSerializer(rawData));
    

you can also implement logic to validate supported serializers for particular Destination, or if there would be 1:1 relationship between destination and serializer you could use templating. But I do not know how it is in C++;

Based on tools and framework you use you can implement one of three sugested ways. Principle remains

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