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I am currently aiming to resize an image and use it in an image container. So what I am doing currently is similar to this (coding from memory.. might have mistakes below, but idea is roughly the same):

BitmapImage test = new BitmapImage;
test.begininit();
test.source = new Uri("myimage.png");
test.decodepixelwidth = 300;
test.decodepixelheight = 220;
test.endinit();
MyPictureContainer1.Source = test;

This loads an image into my container. Now i have another container into which I load the image from the first container like so:

double x,y,w,h;
x = 10;
y = 10;
w = 60;
h = 150;
BitmapImage test2 = new BitmapImage;
test2.begininit();
test2.source = MyPictureContainer1.Source;
test2.sourcerect = new Int32Rect( x, y ,w , h)
test2.endinit();
MyPictureContainer2.Source = test2;

However, despite having taken a resized picture from MyPictureContainer1, and drawn a rectangle mask over it (or what I treat as a rectangle mask) the image inside MyPictureContainer2 is of the actual resolution of the image stored on the disk and not the resized version contained inside MyPictureContainer1.

I hope this makes sense, and someone could offer advice on why I'm getting a cropped version of the image on disk as opposed to a cropped version of the image from MyPictureContainer1?

Many thanks!

share|improve this question
    
test2 is a CroppedBitmap, not a BitmapImage. Right? – Nicolas Repiquet Apr 27 '12 at 10:23
    
Yes, test2 is basically the rectangle which has the cropped image. – PM5K Apr 27 '12 at 10:28

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