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Java: If vs. Switch

For all the conditional statements that are observed in programming, which of these blocks is the most preferred:

  1. Ternary operator
  2. else-if block
  3. switch block

Thanks in advance!

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marked as duplicate by Mat, oers, Greg Bacon, Bill the Lizard Apr 30 '12 at 12:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7  
why don't you benchmark it, and find out? – Alnitak Apr 27 '12 at 10:48
2  
Do you have a performance problem? – Greg Kopff Apr 27 '12 at 10:48
10  
Premature optimization, since most of these will probably result in identical bytecode! – ChristopheD Apr 27 '12 at 10:48
1  
it was asked before on stackoverflow check this – AurA Apr 27 '12 at 10:49
2  
this isnt a homeowork question else i would have tagged it as homework. Thanks @ChristopheD – Anurag Ramdasan Apr 27 '12 at 10:52
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Of course you may implement the comparison in different ways.

I did it this way:

common block:

int a = 42;
int k = 17;

if:

if (a == 42) 
    k+=4;
else    k+=5;

case:

switch (a) {
    case 42: k+=4; break;
    default: k+=5; break;
}

Ternary:

k += (a == 42) ? 4 : 5; 

They don't compile to the same bytecode:

l *Tern*.class
-rw-r--r-- 1 stefan stefan 704 2012-04-27 14:26 CaseIfTern.class
-rw-r--r-- 1 stefan stefan 691 2012-04-27 14:26 IfTernCase.class
-rw-r--r-- 1 stefan stefan 728 2012-04-27 14:26 TernIfCase.class

However, advantages of switch come into play when you have multiple cases - not just 2.

If and ternary get cascading for more than 2 cases.

But they differ idiomatically/semantically. The Ternary operator returns something, but not the if or the switch.

So it isn't that clear what you have to compare.

But I made a benchmark with following result:

0   if      tern    case 
1   3.103   0.244   0.118   
2   0.306   0.276   0.309   
3   0.382   0.329   0.328   
4   0.464   0.435   0.458   
5   5.045   1.519   1.248   
6   4.57    3.088   2.915   
7   4.036   2.977   3.015   
8   3.197   3.834   3.893   
9   4.631   4.523   5.488   
10  6.445   3.891   3.09    

benchmark plot (Benchmark plot)

Which shows, that they really don't make much difference, and that caching effects have still, for 5 M cases, an influence, even after heating up the VM.

In real circumstances, you rarely have million invocations where nearly nothing happens. But if something happens, the time for if/case/ternary becomes soon irrelevant.

Here is the code I tested:

public class CaseTernIf
{
    public static int aORbIf (int a) {
        if (a == 2) 
            return 4;
        else    return 5;
    }

    public static int aORbTern (int a) {
        return  (a == 2) ? 4 : 5;
    }

    public static int aORbCase (int a) {
        switch (a) {
            case 2:  return 4;
            default: return 5; 
        }
    }
}

Here is the Testing code (which is Scala):

object IfCaseTernBench extends Benchcoat [List[Int], Seq[Int]] {

  type I=List[Int]
  type O=Seq[Int]
  val name = "CaseTern"
  /** We return a List of random Ints numbers here. */
  def iGenerator (n: Int) : I = (for (x <- 1 to n) yield math.abs (random.nextInt (3))).toList
  def takePart (li: I, n: Int) : I = li.take (n) 

  /* Each algorithm is called by a mapping to a static method.  */
  def ifTest   (i: I) : O = i.map (CaseTernIf.aORbIf) 
  def caseTest (i: I) : O = i.map (CaseTernIf.aORbCase) 
  def ternTest (i: I) : O = i.map (CaseTernIf.aORbTern) 

  // Map of Test names -> methods to test
  val list2bench: List [(String, I => O)] = List (
       "if test"    -> ifTest _
     , "case test"  -> caseTest _
     , "tern test"  -> ternTest _
  )

  def test = { 
     list2bench.foreach (algo => println (algo._2))
  }
}

updated:

And here is the BenchCoat source

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1  
so all the claims of it being compiled to same bytecode not true? – Anurag Ramdasan Apr 27 '12 at 13:11
1  
@AnuragRamdasan: I think so. Since the code size differs. But maybe another implementation of what to compare exactly, or a different compiler, or maybe what the HotSpotCompiler finally does to the code will change the picture. – user unknown Apr 27 '12 at 13:29
2  
@Neil: Yes, thanks, I updated the table. I made a second run, after I made a more-or-less cosmetic code change, just to be sure, that the results don't change significantly. After updating the graph, I forgot to update the table. Now done. – user unknown Apr 27 '12 at 15:24
1  
@userunknown my respects dude – GingerHead Apr 27 '12 at 23:07
2  
@Neil: Yes, but that shouldn't have happened. I corrected it manually, but I have to investigate the source of this error. – user unknown Apr 27 '12 at 23:19

There isn't much difference if you are using a modern compiler. After compiler optimizes the code, native code should be almost the same.

share|improve this answer

I did the following test:

public class IfElseSwichTernary {

    public static int aORbIf(int a) {
        int x = 0;

        if (a == 2) {
            x = 4;
        } else if (a == 3) {
            x = 5;
        } else if (a == 4) {
            x = 6;
        } else {
            x = 7;
        }           
        return x;
    }

    public static int aORbTern(int a) {
        int x = 0;

        x = (a == 2) ? 4 : ((a == 3) ? 5 : ((a == 4) ? 6 : 7));         
        return x;
    }

    public static int aORbCase(int a) {
        int x = 0;

        switch (a) {
        case 2:
            x = 4;
            break;
        case 3:
            x = 5;
            break;
        case 4:
            x = 6;
            break;
        default:
            x = 7;
        }           
        return x;
    }
}

And I decompied with a java decompiler and got the following code:

public class IfElseSwichTernary {

public static int aORbIf(int a) {
    int x = 0;

    if (a == 2) {
        x = 4;
    } else if (a == 3) {
        x = 5;
    } else if (a == 4) {
        x = 6;
    } else {
        x = 7;
    }           
    return x;
}

public static int aORbTern(int a) {
    int x = 0;

    x = (a == 2) ? 4 : ((a == 3) ? 5 : ((a == 4) ? 6 : 7));         
    return x;
}

public static int aORbCase(int a) {
    int x = 0;

    switch (a) {
    case 2:
        x = 4;
        break;
    case 3:
        x = 5;
        break;
    case 4:
        x = 6;
        break;
    default:
        x = 7;
    }           
    return x;
}

}

Which means that the compiler doesn't change anything (I don't know if the JVM will change when converting it and running the insructions)

If it says in the same logic than Switch is more to the perfomace when we are talking more than two conditions.

share|improve this answer
    
Your switch/case lacks break; statements, and falls through. – user unknown Apr 27 '12 at 14:58
1  
Fixed the breaks – GingerHead Apr 27 '12 at 15:56

It depends on the implementation of the JVM and also the version, you can't say in general, if a statement is the fastest.

for example the bytecode generated could also be the same for all statements.

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The ternary operator is just a shorthand form of writing an if (something) { yay } else { boo }, with an easier assignment performed. The ternary operator will expand to an if else construct, there is no difference in bytecode.

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2  
Please don't propagate the myth that the ternary operator is a shorthand if statement. – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 27 '12 at 13:54

Ternary operator is most efficient simply because it doesn't require "goto"'s in the assembly where else-if blocks do. I think switch cases are no more efficient than else-if blocks, assuming all you're doing in the else-if blocks is comparing one value to another (since essentially that's all switch is doing ultimately).

However, you should factor in another consideration: clarity. More important picking the usage which is most efficient is writing clear and concise code. For this, I would recommend else-if or switch blocks rather than ternary operators since you begin to cross eyes looking for the value that gets returned otherwise.

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1  
He is asking in the terms of performence only. so this doesn't answer the question – GingerHead Apr 27 '12 at 10:55
1  
Have you checked this by looking at byte code generated by a ternary? – Don Roby Apr 27 '12 at 10:55
    
@JohnDoe, I answered his question and added more pertinent information as well. – Neil Apr 27 '12 at 10:56
1  
there is no goto in assembly when you don't use goto in the above condtional block arrangers case – GingerHead Apr 27 '12 at 10:59
1  
@DonRoby My respects – GingerHead Apr 27 '12 at 11:02

You have three conditional block arrangers:

  1. Ternary operator
  2. else-if block
  3. switch case

They all perform the same in case of performnce but ironically they are turned to the same code when they are compiled to byte-code by the compiler

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2  
Not true, switch is the top performer in cases where it is applicable. It is (or has the potential to be) O(1), no matter how many case clauses. At least it's that for primitive switch values. For strings it is also more efficient than if equals - else if equals - else if equals. – Marko Topolnik Apr 27 '12 at 11:16
    
-1. I offered a thread which demonstrates that Ternary operator is more efficient than switch. – Neil Apr 27 '12 at 12:36
2  
i just tried to keep a thread open for more clarification. if your answer holds true it shall be accepted sir! – Anurag Ramdasan Apr 27 '12 at 13:14
1  
This saved my day thanks! – Human Being Jan 14 '15 at 9:28

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