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I have SQL Server CE 3.5 database. I run the following code:

private void Load(string sql)
{
  if (connection.State != ConnectionState.Open)
    connection.Open();
  SqlCeDataAdapter sqlCeDataAdapter = new SqlCeDataAdapter(sql, connection);

  Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();

  DataSet dataSet = new DataSet();
  try
  {
    Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;
    watch.Start();

    sqlCeDataAdapter.Fill(dataSet, "items");
    sqlCeDataAdapter.Dispose();

    var myBind = new BindingSource(dataSet, "items");
    grid.DataSource = myBind;
  }
  finally
  {
    watch.Stop();
    Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
    MessageBox.Show(watch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
  }      
}

Load ("select a1, a2 from table");

Is it long for SQL Server CE, or should it be faster loaded?

What can I do to make this select faster?

When I use joins with other table, the time dramatically grows up ...

EDIT:

I have change the code for a following new version, but still 7.5 s. ...

private void Load2 (string sql)
{
  if (connection.State != System.Data.ConnectionState.Open)
  {
    connection.Open();
  }

  using (SqlCeCommand command = new SqlCeCommand(sql, connection))
  {
    Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();

    Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;
    watch.Start();
    using (SqlCeDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
    {
      DataSet dataSet = new DataSet();

      dataSet.Tables.Add("items");

      dataSet.Tables["items"].Columns.Add("s1");
      dataSet.Tables["items"].Columns.Add("s2");

      while (reader.Read())
      {
        string s1 = reader.GetString(0);
        string s2 = reader.GetString(1);

        dataSet.Tables["items"].Rows.Add(s1, s2);
      }
      watch.Stop();
      Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
      MessageBox.Show(watch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());

      BindingSource binding = new BindingSource(dataSet, "items");
      grid.DataSource = binding;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
post your query –  Diego Apr 27 '12 at 11:05
    
It is: select a.column1, a.column2 from table a –  John Apr 27 '12 at 11:08
    
@your edit, You must understand also that you have other limiting factors like disk IO since your using SQL CE, and you don't have a server processing SQL transactions with any sort of optimizations or load balancing. –  David Anderson - DCOM Apr 27 '12 at 11:28

1 Answer 1

SqlCeDataAdapter.Fill(...) is just notoriously slow. If you really need the performance you will need to use a SqlCeDataReader instead.

private void Load(string sql) {
    if (connection.State != System.Data.ConnectionState.Open) {
        connection.Open();
    }

    using (SqlCeCommand command = new SqlCeCommand(sql, connection)) {
        using (SqlCeDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader()) {
            DataSet dataSet = new DataSet();

            dataSet.Tables.Add("items");

            while (reader.Read()) {
                DataRow row = dataSet.Tables["items"].NewRow();
                // fill your row

                dataSet.Tables["items"].Rows.Add(row);
            }

            BindingSource binding = new BindingSource(dataSet, "items");
            grid.DataSource = binding;
        }
    }
}

And of course add your proper error handling, and clean it up to your liking. There's also Entity Framework which is decent on performance compared to a DbDataAdapter implementation.

Because you are using SqlCe, you have other limiting factors like disk IO, and you don't have a server processing SQL transactions with any sort of optimizations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I have changed the code for your version, but still I get 7.5 seconds... I have edited my post, you could see how I changed it.. –  John Apr 27 '12 at 11:27
    
It might be your disk IO that's limiting to you. On my machine I was able to process 7000 records in about 2 seconds. Using a SqlCeDataReader is as low-level as it gets in .NET. –  David Anderson - DCOM Apr 27 '12 at 12:21

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