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I'm playing a bit with auto parallelization in ICC (11.1; old, but can't do anything about it) and I'm wondering why the compiler can't parallelize the inner loop for a simple gaussian elimination:

void makeTriangular(float **matrix, float *vector, int n) {
    for (int pivot = 0; pivot < n - 1; pivot++) {
        // swap row so that the row with the largest value is
        // at pivot position for numerical stability
        int swapPos = findPivot(matrix, pivot, n);
        std::swap(matrix[pivot], matrix[swapPos]);
        std::swap(vector[pivot], vector[swapPos]);
        float pivotVal = matrix[pivot][pivot];
        for (int row = pivot + 1; row < n; row++) { // line 72; should be parallelized
            float tmp = matrix[row][pivot] / pivotVal;  
            for (int col = pivot + 1; col < n; col++) { // line 74
                matrix[row][col] -= matrix[pivot][col] * tmp;
            }
            vector[row] -= vector[pivot] * tmp;
        }
    }
}

We're only writing to the arrays dependent on the private row (and col) variable and row is guaranteed to be larger than pivot, so it should be obvious to the compiler that we aren't overwriting anything.

I'm compiling with -O3 -fno-alias -parallel -par-report3 and get lots of dependencies ala: assumed FLOW dependence between matrix line 75 and matrix line 73. or assumed ANTI dependence between matrix line 73 and matrix line 75. and the same for line 75 alone. What problem does the compiler have? Obviously I could tell it exactly what to do with some pragmas, but I want to understand what the compiler can get alone.

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For me it seems that while the compiler tries to parallelize this code it not only considers memory locations, but also the registers machine has. I'm not a "compiler guy" :). Very deep question. –  parallelgeek Apr 27 '12 at 15:05
1  
@parallelgeek Not really. The reason memory dependencies between loop iterations are a problem is because parallelizing would change the semantics in that case (eg do I read before/after another thread writes a value). Every core has its own register set so that wouldn't be a problem. –  Voo Apr 27 '12 at 17:16
    
Maybe it's because the inner loop is not "perfectly nested"? I'm just curious! :) I don't see any true dependency, restricting parallelization in a case of updating rows of trailing submatrix. But compiler may be more conservative about not perfectly fit nests. :) –  parallelgeek Apr 27 '12 at 20:38
    
@parallel Also not sure about how icc parallelizes things, so this question is basically a try to find out :) Oh well, a few hundred reps bounty should help things along as soon as I can. –  Voo Apr 27 '12 at 21:23
    
What is your real task? Why this example is discussed? You're just trying to dig into the compiler things for a different code, or need to optimize this one? Maybe PLASMA (MAGMA) library is what fits? –  parallelgeek Apr 27 '12 at 23:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Basically the compiler can't figure out that there's no dependency due to the name matrix and the name vector being both read from and written too (even though with different regions). You might be able to get around this in the following fashion (though slightly dirty):

void makeTriangular(float **matrix, float *vector, int n)
{     
    for (int pivot = 0; pivot < n - 1; pivot++) 
    {         
         // swap row so that the row with the largest value is    
         // at pivot position for numerical stability       
         int swapPos = findPivot(matrix, pivot, n);    
         std::swap(matrix[pivot], matrix[swapPos]);   
         std::swap(vector[pivot], vector[swapPos]);     
         float pivotVal = matrix[pivot][pivot];     
         float **matrixForWriting = matrix;  // COPY THE POINTER
         float *vectorForWriting = vector;   // COPY THE POINTER
         // (then parallelize this next for loop as you were)
         for (int row = pivot + 1; row < n; row++)  { 
              float tmp = matrix[row][pivot] / pivotVal;               
              for (int col = pivot + 1; col < n; col++) {
                  // WRITE TO THE matrixForWriting VERSION
                  matrixForWriting[row][col] = matrix[row][col] - matrix[pivot][col] * tmp; 
              } 
              // WRITE TO THE vectorForWriting VERSION
              vectorForWriting[row] = vector[row] - vector[pivot] * tmp; 
         } 
    }
} 

Bottom line is just give the ones you're writing to a temporarily different name to trick the compiler. I know that it's a little dirty and I wouldn't recommend this kind of programming in general. But if you're sure that you have no data dependency, it's perfectly fine.

In fact, I'd put some comments around it that are very clear to future people who see this code that this was a workaround, and why you did it.

Edit: I think the answer was basically touched on by @FPK and an answer was posted by @Evgeny Kluev. However, in @Evgeny Kluev's answer he suggests making this an input parameter and that might parallelize but won't give the correct value since the entries in matrix won't be updated. I think the code I posted above will give the correct answer too.

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Yes no reason to add an input parameter there, because it seems fno-alias overrules everything, even if the aliasing is obvious - nice although still really hackish. Note that the way Evgeny wanted to use the input parameter should give the correct answer as well as far as I can see, but defining variables as local as possible is good style so this is better. –  Voo May 3 '12 at 22:57
    
icc 12.1 (Linux, 64 bit, and the same compiler options) does not parallelize this code and gives exactly the same explanations as the code in OP. I think, the compiler's optimizer just merges 'matrixForWriting' and 'matrix' back into single variable. –  Evgeny Kluev May 4 '12 at 9:27
    
@Evgeny Strange, I wrote basically the same version myself after reading your post and icc 12.1 (neither version works for 11.1 on ia32 though) with fno-alias does indeed parallelize correctly. –  Voo May 4 '12 at 10:52
    
Anyway, dealing with only local variables requires to defeat both optimizer and auto-parallelizer. Hard to say for sure when it will parallelize and when it will not. Just hackish... –  Evgeny Kluev May 4 '12 at 11:15
    
I forced this code to be auto-parallelizad only with this additional trick: float **matrixForWriting = (float**)((unsigned long long)((char*)matrix + 4)) - 1;. –  Evgeny Kluev May 4 '12 at 16:17

The same auto-parallelization problem is on icc 12.1. So I used this newer version for experiments.

Adding an output matrix to your function's parameter list and changing body of the third loop to this

out[row][col] = matrix[row][col] - matrix[pivot][col] * tmp;

fixed the "FLOW dependence" problem. Which means, "-fno-alias" affects only function parameters, while contents of the single parameter remain under suspicion of being aliased. I don't know why this option does not affect everything. Since different parts of your matrix do not really alias each other, you can just leave this additional parameter to the function and pass the same matrix through this parameter.

Interestingly, while complaining about 'matrix', compiler say nothing about 'vector', which really has aliasing problems: this line vector[row] -= vector[pivot] * tmp; may lead to false aliasing (writing to vector[row] in one thread may touch the cache line, storing vector[pivot], used by every thread).

"FLOW dependence" is not the only problem in this code. After it was fixed, compiler still refuses to parallelize second and third loops because of "insufficient computational work". So I tried to give it some extra work:

float tmp = matrix[row][pivot] * pivotVal;
...
out[row][col] = matrix[row][col] - matrix[pivot][col] *tmp /pivotVal /pivotVal;

And after all this, the second loop was at last parallelized, though I'm not sure if it gained any speed improvement.


Update: I found a better alternative to giving computer "some extra work". Option -par-threshold50 does the trick.

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+1 I was going to suggest the same trick. –  Chris A. May 3 '12 at 20:04
    
In reality I'm doing arbitrary precision math, so there's more work available. Wrt to the vector problem: I think because there's no real aliasing going on, the compiler is responsible to make sure no problems happen (basically a lock prefix for x86 I assume). Works nice with 12.1 on my own CPU, sadly intel only has up to 11.1 for ia32 and the compiler isn't clever enough even with that trick. Well good experience anyhow. You really earned that small rep bonus, thanks! –  Voo May 3 '12 at 22:52
    
Note: Since @Chris extended upon your solution, I thought I'd give you the rep bonus and accept Chris's answer so that both of you get a bit more rep than the meager +10. Hope that's fine. –  Voo May 3 '12 at 22:55
1  
Concerning 'vector': false aliasing does not impose any correctness problem, but performance may degrade. Definitely, that does not worsen performance significantly, because most computations are done on 'matrix', not 'vector'. –  Evgeny Kluev May 4 '12 at 9:18
    
And 'vector' problem may be partially solved: just calculate `float pv = vector[pivot]' outside the second loop. –  Evgeny Kluev May 4 '12 at 10:38

I have no access to an icc to test my idea but I suspect the compiler fears aliasing: matrix is defined as float**: an array of pointers pointing to arrays of floats. All those pointers could point to the same float array so parallizing this would be very dangerous. This would make no sense, but the compiler cannot know.

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I'm specifically compiling with fno-alias to avoid that problem, which I think should be good enough shouldn't it? –  Voo Apr 28 '12 at 12:25
1  
I'am not sure if icc considers this as alias or as flow dependence as reported. But I think you can test my idea easily: remove the matrix parameter and declare it as global array instead: float matrix[1000][1000]; for testing. –  FPK Apr 28 '12 at 13:08
    
Will try that and report back - good idea! –  Voo Apr 28 '12 at 13:57
    
No, doing it with globally allocated memory doesn't help either, we get the same kind of dependencies.. –  Voo Apr 28 '12 at 14:12

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